Pumpkin Spiced Candied Walnuts with Bittersweet Chocolate

*This post is in partnership with California Walnuts. I am thrilled to be working with them on a series of posts that will be popping up here throughout the next year. I can not wait to share with you all sorts of walnut-laced recipes. Thank you so much for supporting the brands that support the… Read more »

*This post is in partnership with California Walnuts. I am thrilled to be working with them on a series of posts that will be popping up here throughout the next year. I can not wait to share with you all sorts of walnut-laced recipes. Thank you so much for supporting the brands that support the work I do in this space. I am so fortunate to work with some amazing companies.

You guys, I’ve done it. I have fallen victim to the pumpkin spice craze. But here me out. Well, I guess I don’t really have much of a case except that I love it. The warmth that comes from a blend of cinnamon, ginger, nutmeg and clove is exactly what I want in everything right now. Yes, I’ll drink it in my coffee. Absolutely I’ll have it in my yogurt. You want me to eat it with my cereal? No problem. Totally into it. Should I toss buttery walnuts with a sweet pumpkin spiced coating and then slather in chocolate? The answer is YES! So while I know that pumpkin spice anything is basically internet gold, let me assure you that this pumpkin spice is here for genuine enjoyment.

Our beautiful walnut halves start with a sweetened and spiced frothy egg white mixture. The addition of the egg white gives a crisp, crackly sweetness that I can’t quit. We then toss those warm candied walnuts in melted bittersweet chocolate then shower flake salt over top. Because that’s who we are.

The season of giving and gathering is among and these are perfect for such occasions. A large batch of these addictive sweets is thrown together quite quickly and make the perfect hostess gift for all those holiday shindigs right around the corner. Tuck a few in a pretty bag or jar with a ribbon and then be the favored guest at all the parties. Just be sure to save plenty for yourself because self-care is important too.

Pumpkin Spiced Candied Walnuts with Bittersweet Chocolate

Ingredients

1 egg white

1/2 cup / 100 grams sugar

4 cups / 560 grams walnuts

3 teaspoons pumpkin spice (recipe below)

1 teaspoon sea salt

200 grams bittersweet chocolate, melted

Flake salt

Instructions

Preheat your oven to 350°F and line a baking sheet with parchment paper.

In a large bowl whisk the egg white until frothy. Add the sugar and whisk to combine. Stir in the walnuts, pumpkin spice and salt. Mix well.

Add the nut mixture to the prepared sheet pan and roast for 10 minutes. After 10 minutes stir well and continue to roast until the nuts are deeply toasted and smell delightfully fragrant.

While the walnuts are roasting melt the chocolate in a large bowl set over a pot of simmering water.

Toss the candied almonds in the melted chocolate and stir well to coat.

Return them back to the sheet pan, shower with flake salt then chill for 20 minutes in the fridge.

Keep any uneated walnuts in a well sealed container. These beauties will keep for up to 3 weeks.

Pumpkin Spice

4 teaspoons cinnamon

2 teaspoons ginger

1 teaspoon ground cloves

1 teaspoon freshly ground nutmeg

Combine all the spices in a small bowl and store in a well sealed container for up to 3 months.

Fancy Jello Mold

Photo: Joe Lingeman for NYMAG

I don’t know about you guys, but I think jelly molds are ready for a comeback. Or are they already back? …

Photo:  Joe Lingeman  for  NYMAG

Photo: Joe Lingeman for NYMAG

I don’t know about you guys, but I think jelly molds are ready for a comeback. Or are they already back? I’ve seen them popping up here and there, and I have made a surprising number of them for photoshoots this year. I have totally fallen in love with their kitchy vibe and stunning colors. They can be totally delicious too! NYMag agrees and they asked me to create a gift worthy jelly mold for their annual gift guide which is on newsstands today. 

Impress your guests this holiday or bring one to a potluck and totally blow your friends minds. All you need is a fun shaped vessel – I like decorative cake pans (Nordicware makes great ones) but you could totally just use a regular glass or stainless mixing bowl, gelatin, juice, and some time. Have fun! Happy Holidays! 


Fancy Jelly Mold

I used Nordicware’s Charlotte Pan for this jelly, which is super cute and the little divots on top are the perfect shape to hold a cranberry or a raspberry. If you’d like to make a larger jelly mold you can double or triple this recipe. This jelly has some Framboise in it, but to make it more family friendly you can substitute cranberry juice for the Framboise. Pomegranate juice will also make a very tasty jelly, but it will be a bit more opaque and tart than the cranberry.

To suspend fruit in a larger mold, let the cranberry jelly mixture set until it is the texture of egg whites. At this point you can fold the fruit into the jelly and spoon it into the mold. The pictured mold uses cranberry juice, but you can also use pomegranate juice. The jelly will be slightly less clear and you will need to add 2 more tablespoons of sugar if using pomegranate juice.

For a clear jelly - Use white cranberry juice (or prosecco!) - every 3 cups of juice will need 2 envelopes of gelatin to set. You can also add a bit of clear liquor to the mix, like elderflower. Yum! If you’d like to add edible flowers, let the jelly set until it is the consistency of egg whites, pour it into the mold and place the flowers in the jelly one at a time. Make sure to arrange them to the prettiest side of the flowers is facing out because we all know this is about looks.

24 fresh cranberries

3 (1/4 ounce) envelopes unflavored powdered gelatin

3 1/2 cups cranberry juice cocktail or pomegranate juice

2 tablespoons sugar 

4 tablespoons Framboise

2 tablespoons lemon juice

1/2 cup sweetened condensed milk 

Food coloring (if desired)


Place 1 cranberry in each divot of the pan and set in the fridge to chill. 

Bloom the gelatin. In a small bowl stir the gelatin into 1 cup of the cranberry juice. Let sit for 5 minutes, until the gelatin is moistened.

Heat 1 cup cranberry juice and the sugar until simmering. Remove it from the heat and stir in the bloomed gelatin. Stir until the gelatin is completely dissolved, warm it gently over low heat if necessary to dissolve the gelatin, but do not boil. Add the remaining cranberry juice, lemon juice, and Framboise, and stir to combine.

Divide the mixture between 2 containers (a measuring cup with a spout works great) and stir the condensed milk into 1/2 of the gelatin mixture. Keep the gelatin at room temperature as you build the layers.

Pour a thin layer of the clear cranberry gelatin over the top of the chilled cranberries in the mold, just to cover the cranberries and the bottom of the mold. Chill until completely firm, about 30 minutes. After it has chilled, gently pour 1/2 of the condensed milk gelatin mixture over the top and refrigerate until completely firm, about 30 minutes. 

At this point, if you’d like the finished mold to be more colorful you can add food coloring to the remaining batches of gelatin. I tinted the bottom layer of the pictured mold with a tiny bit of orange.

Pour a layer of the cranberry gelatin over the chilled condensed milk gelatin and refrigerate until firm. Finish with the last layer of condensed milk gelatin and chill until completely firm, 4 hours or overnight. If the remaining gelatin hardens in between these steps you can very gently warm it over low heat. Do not boil it or it will not set.

To unmold, dip the gelatin mold in warm water for about 10 seconds. Place a serving platter over the top and invert. The gelatin should gently fall onto the plate. If it doesn’t quickly dip it in warm water again. Slice and serve!

Instant Pot Creamiest Steel-Cut Oatmeal (with stovetop version!)

Hellooooo! I’m alive, I’m alive! Did you think after my 10-year blogiversary post that I decided to take a 10-year break? lol. It’s been a busy month with a lot of fun events going down. I just returned from WXN’s Canada’s Most Powerful Women celebrations, and I’m still riding the high of winning an award […]

Hellooooo! I’m alive, I’m alive! Did you think after my 10-year blogiversary post that I decided to take a 10-year break? lol. It’s been a busy month with a lot of fun events going down. I just returned from WXN’s Canada’s Most Powerful Women celebrations, and I’m still riding the high of winning an award in the Entrepreneur category and meeting so many incredible people. So many happy tears this week. It felt (and feels) absolutely surreal. I’m super inspired by these amazing Canadian women to keep going forward, doing my part to give back, and creating meaningful change in this world. I’m grateful to you all who support me and what I do…truly, thank you.

Here’s a snippet of the interview I did with WXN (the rest is found on their website):

SUCCESS all comes back to love. Do I feel love deep in my soul for what I’m doing? Are my kids and my husband happy and loved? Am I taking time to enjoy the process rather than allowing perfectionist thinking to take hold? My definition of success has grown so much since starting the blog, writing my two cookbooks, and becoming a mother. Today, success is knowing that I have the power to push through challenges while taking the time I need for myself to balance and stay healthy. After struggling with illness this past year, one of my biggest wake-up calls was realizing that it’s okay to take a break even if that means letting go of a professional goal for the time being.”

As an introvert, big social events tend to tucker me out (anyone else?!), and I find myself looking forward to my first day without any commitments (aside from, umm, two hyper toddlers, I suppose…). This creamy 3-ingredient steel-cut oatmeal recipe is the one I’ve been making once or twice weekly since fall hit. It may sound strange, but I find it calming in a way. I just love that I can throw a few ingredients in my Instant Pot, stir it up, and walk away until it’s done cooking! No stirring or watching…woot, woot. I’ll often throw it on and then get ready for the day or feed the kids and come back to a hot pot of oats. It’s a good feeling…a darn good feeling!

Don’t worry if you don’t have an Instant Pot because I also provide a stovetop version below—your oatmeal will turn out the same either way, but the stovetop version just requires monitoring and stirring as it cooks.

This time of year I love to top a hot bowl with toasted walnuts, chopped dates or raisins, cinnamon or pumpkin pie spice, maple syrup, and seasonal fruit like pear or pomegranate. So cozy! Walnuts or pecans with maple syrup, cinnamon, and peanut butter is another dreamy combo.

Before I go, a quick note that we’ll be participating in Giving Tuesday this coming Tuesday November 27, 2018. Here’s a bit about the cause:

“GivingTuesday is a global movement for giving and volunteering, taking place each year after Black Friday. The “Opening day of the giving season,” it’s a time when charities, companies and individuals join together and rally for favourite causes. In the same way that retailers take part in Black Friday, the giving community comes together for GivingTuesday.”

This coming Tuesday, we’ll be donating 100% of that day’s OSG recipe app proceeds to Toronto’s Daily Bread Food Bank as our way to take part. I hope you’ll consider participating in #GivingTuesday too! 

   

4.9 from 15 reviews
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The Creamiest Steel-Cut Oats

Vegan, gluten-free, nut-free, oil-free, refined sugar-free, soy-free

My goal was to create the creamiest bowl of steel-cut oats using just a few ingredients...and this is it! This luxuriously chewy steel-cut oatmeal is the perfect base for all of your favourite topping combinations. I love adding pure maple syrup, cinnamon, seasonal fruit, toasted walnuts, and chopped dates or raisins. It doesn’t get much cozier on a cool fall or winter morning! I’ve also provided cooking instructions using both the stovetop and Instant Pot (I prefer the Instant Pot method as it's so easy). For the Instant Pot method, please see the Tip section.

Yield
2 3/4 cups or 4 servings
Prep time
2 Minutes
Cook time
25 Minutes

Ingredients:

For the oatmeal:
  • 1 (14-ounce/398 mL) can light coconut milk
  • 1 cup (250 mL) water
  • 1 cup (172 g) uncooked steel-cut oats
Serving suggestions:
  • Seasonal fruit
  • Pure maple syrup
  • Toasted walnuts
  • Dash fine sea salt, stirred in
  • Cinnamon
  • Raisins or chopped pitted Medjool dates

Directions:

  1. STOVETOP METHOD: Pour the can of coconut milk and 1 cup (250 mL) water into a medium pot and bring to a low boil over high heat.
  2. Add the steel-cut oats to the pot and stir to combine. Immediately reduce the heat to low (low heat is important or they’ll burn) and gently simmer, covered, for 30 to 40 minutes, stirring four to five times during cooking and reducing heat if necessary to prevent burning. This method produces a thick pot of oats. For a porridge-like consistency, stir more water in to your liking. I like to stir in about 1/2 cup (125 mL) water after cooking.
  3. Portion into bowls and top with your desired garnishes—I love the combo of pure maple syrup, toasted walnuts, seasonal fruit, fine sea salt, cinnamon, and raisins or chopped dates, but feel free to get creative and change it up depending on the season. Leftovers will keep in an airtight container in the fridge for 5 to 7 days or you can freeze them for up to 1 month. I store cooled single portions in freezer-safe bags and lie them flat in the freezer for easy stacking. Reheat refrigerated or thawed leftovers on the stovetop in a small pot along with a splash of water or milk over medium heat.

Tips:

INSTANT POT METHOD:

 

  • Add the coconut milk and water to the Instant Pot, followed by the oats. Stir to combine.
  • Secure lid in the lock position and check that the Steam Release Handle is pointing to the “Sealing” position.
  • Press the “Pressure Cook” (or “Manual”) button and set the cook time to 7 minutes on high pressure. After 5 seconds you’ll hear a couple beeps and the screen will say “on”. The cooking process has begun!
  • Once finished, you’ll hear a few beeps letting you know that cooking is over. Now let the Instant Pot do a “Natural Pressure Release”—I wait 10 minutes for most of the the pressure to release on its own.
  • Carefully release any remaining steam before removing the lid. Stir the oatmeal until combined, adding more milk or water if you’d like to thin it. It’ll be oh-so-creamy and continue thickening as it sits!
  • Portion into bowls and top with your desired garnishes—I love the combo of pure maple syrup, toasted walnuts, seasonal fruit, fine sea salt, cinnamon, and raisins or chopped dates, but feel free to get creative and change it up depending on the season. Leftovers will keep in an airtight container in the fridge for 5 to 7 days or you can freeze them for up to 1 month. I store cooled single portions in freezer-safe bags and lie them flat in the freezer for easy stacking. Reheat refrigerated or thawed leftovers on the stovetop in a small pot along with a splash of water or milk over medium heat.

You can also make pre-portioned servings so all you have to do is dump it in a pot in the morning and quickly heat it up with a splash of milk! 

Grain-free Holiday Tahini Cookies, 2-ways + A Gift Guide

You know the feeling: it’s twenty minutes after dinner. You’re full and seemingly suffonsified, when it hits you. I NEED A TREAT. Raisins will not help. Granola won’t cut it. Coconut chips? Pfff. That teeny square of dark chocolate you were keeping as a fallback […]

The post Grain-free Holiday Tahini Cookies, 2-ways + A Gift Guide appeared first on My New Roots.


You know the feeling: it’s twenty minutes after dinner. You’re full and seemingly suffonsified, when it hits you. I NEED A TREAT. Raisins will not help. Granola won’t cut it. Coconut chips? Pfff. That teeny square of dark chocolate you were keeping as a fallback has mysteriously gone missing (blame the kid!) and you’re desperate for an indulgence without anything in sight…sound the alarm!

That’s what happened to me recently, which lead me to frenetically probe the internet for something that could satisfy me in a hurry, which lead me to a 5-ingredient Almond Tahini cookie recipe from Cook Republic. The cookies looked really tasty, super simple to make, and I had everything I needed to get baking right away. Within 20 minutes I was eating said cookies, and I hadn’t even panicked. That much.


This recipe turned out to be so brilliant that I made the cookies again a few nights later. Then about a week after that. Each time, adjusting and adding ingredients for more flavour and texture each time until they were perfect. And now, I really feel like these cookies are my go-to, since they’re grain-and-gluten-free, high in protein and good fats, naturally sweetened, and endlessly customizable!

The best thing about these cookies however, is their dream texture: crispy outsides, and super chewy insides. And they are so satisfyingly dense that they really feel like food – not just a treat to curb a craving.  They are also deliciously not-too-sweet, especially with the flaky salt on top that comes at you like firework flavour sparks.

 

 

For this post, I’ve made two variations for those who can’t decide on which festive flavours they love most: sweet and warming Orange-Spice to put us all in the holiday mood, and a rich and piquant Ginger-Molasses that is delightfully reminiscent of classic gingerbread. I used maple syrup to sweeten both cookies, but cut the amount in half for the Ginger-Molasses to make room for the blackstrap goodness! If you’d like to keep this version even lower on the glycemic index, you can replace all the maple syrup with molasses, just know that they will be very intense, and for molasses-lovers only. If you’d like to learn more about the health benefits of blackstrap molasses, how to purchase the right kind, and how to store it, check out my blog post here.

You’ll notice down below that I specify runny tahini in the recipe. This is because the tahini acts as part of the liquid component here, along with the maple syrup and molasses. If you only have thicker tahini, I suggest warming it together with the syrup(s) on the stove over low heat to achieve the runniness you need for the recipe to work. I got my tahini at a local grocery store that has a pretty decent ethnic food section. It’s perfect for baking since it’s inexpensive, and because the flavour of it gets overwhelmed by the other ingredients anyway. Save your expensive tahini for toast!

 


 

If cookies aren’t your thing (are you a robot?), then check out the list below for a bunch of edible presents from My New Roots that are the perfect make-ahead gift to bring to all of those holiday parties, family get-togethers, and work socials. Some are sweet, some are savoury, but they all can be made in large batches and have a long-ish shelf life.

I will also mention that we’re taking holiday orders for the Life-Changing Loaf Subscription Box up until this Sunday, November 25th. That means if you order your box for yourself (or someone else to send as a gift!), it will arrive before the holidays. If you decide to order after November 25th, the box will come in the New Year. Remember that each box contains the ingredients for two loaves of Life-Changing Loaf! Thank you to everyone who has already ordered – your box is on the way!

 

 My New Roots Homemade Edible Gifts

 

Drink mixes

Big Batch Golden Milk

Superfood Haute Chocolate

Masala Chai


Things in jars

Infused Syrup Gift Jars

Party Nut Butter

Simple Gourmet Granola

Chunky Chocolate Buckwheat Granola

Maple Cinnamon Grain-Free Granola

 

Spice blends

Za’atar Spice Blend 

Everything Bagel Spice Blend

Dukkah Spice Blend

 

The post Grain-free Holiday Tahini Cookies, 2-ways + A Gift Guide appeared first on My New Roots.

Brussels Sprout and Green Apple Slaw with Pickled Cranberries

I won’t take up too much of your time because at this point your turkey is probably defrosting and menu plans are well underway. But I didn’t want to let the holiday pass us by without sharing this recipe for a simple, bright and fresh slaw. While I am one to honor the traditional flavors… Read more »

I won’t take up too much of your time because at this point your turkey is probably defrosting and menu plans are well underway. But I didn’t want to let the holiday pass us by without sharing this recipe for a simple, bright and fresh slaw. While I am one to honor the traditional flavors and dishes that Thanksgiving brings I am always eager for a bit of health and heft on the table.

This slaw is just ever-so-slightly creamy with the addition of a bit of mayonnaise in the dressing. The cranberries pop and cause a bit of a pleasant pucker from their bath in a sweet and spiced brine. Green apple carries another hit of sweet tang while heaps of fresh dill and scallion nudge the salad back toward the savory. All of this to say it’s a delicious salad that will sit beautifully on our holiday table next to our smoked turkey with a bourbon and bacon gravy and fresh corn and cornbread stuffing.

I hope you all have a wonderful Thanksgiving brimming with gratitude and grace.

 

Brussels Sprout and Green Apple Slaw with Pickled Cranberries

Ingredients

Pickled Cranberries

1 cup apple cider vinegar

1/2 cup brown sugar

3/4 cup water

1/4 teaspoon cinnamon

1/4 teaspoon ginger

4 cloves

Pinch salt

8 ounces cranberries ( about 2 cups)

Dressing

1/3 cup pickling liquid

3 tablespoons mayo

Salt

Salad

8 cups shredded Brussels (about 1 pound)

2 small green apples, diced or julienned

1 cup chopped dill

3 green onions, white and green parts thinly sliced

Instructions

Pickle the cranberries:

In a medium saucepan combine the vinegar, sugar, water, salt and spices and bring to a simmer. Add the cranberries then turn off the heat. Let cool. These can be made up to 3 days in advance. Cover and refrigerate.

Make the dressing:

In a small bowl whisk together the pickling brine with the mayonnaise. Add a pinch of salt. Taste and adjust to your liking. It should have a bit of bite to it.

Assemble the salad:

In a large bowl combine the brussels sprouts, green apple, dill, scallions, and dressing. Mix well to combine. Drain the remaining bring off the cranberries then add to the salad.

Serve straightaway.

My Favorite Pumpkin Pie

I posted a photo of this sunshiney pumpkin pie a few days ago on Instagram and lots of you nice folks asked for the recipe, so here it is! Its the pumpkin pie recipe from my book a…

winter luxury pumpkin pie | apt 2b baking co.JPG

I posted a photo of this sunshiney pumpkin pie a few days ago on Instagram and lots of you nice folks asked for the recipe, so here it is! Its the pumpkin pie recipe from my book and it includes a few of my very favorite things - maple syrup, creme fraiche, and roasted squash puree. You can definitely use canned pumpkin puree too, but roasted butternut squash is nice if you have it. The crust in this photo was a little experiment that I am working on, but I have linked to my favorite crust below. Feel free to use what you like if you have another one though. Happy Thanksgiving everyone!

Winter Luxury Pumpkin Pie

from Sweeter off the Vine

Makes one 9-inch pie

 A couple of years ago, after attending the Common Ground Fair in Maine, I fell in love with the winter luxury pumpkin. Winter luxuries are an heirloom variety of pumpkin prized for their caramel infused flavor and smooth texture. They are admittedly hard to find, even in NYC, but if you can locate one where you live I highly suggest picking it up. They are about the size of a sugar pumpkin and they have beautiful netting on their skin, almost like a cantaloupe. Winter luxuries (that name!) have thinner skins than most hard winter squash so they can’t be stored as long as other varieties, which is part of the reason they have fallen out of favor with farmers. Substitute roasted butternut squash or canned pumpkin purée if winter luxury pumpkins aren’t available where you live. If you are concerned about over filling the pie shell, bake any extra filling alongside the pie in buttered ramekins until it puffs slightly in the center.

1 disc of your favorite pie crust - This is mine  

 2 cups (450g) roasted butternut squash purée (canned pumpkin works too!)

3/4 cup Grade B maple syrup

3/4 cup heavy cream

1/2 cup (112g) crème fraîche

3 eggs, lightly beaten

1 teaspoon vanilla extract

3/4 teaspoon cinnamon

1/4 teaspoon allspice

1/8 teaspoon nutmeg

1/2 teaspoon salt

Position a rack in the lower third of the oven and preheat it to 425ºF.

 To blind bake the crust:

On a lightly floured surface, roll out the pie dough into a roughly 12-inch circle about 1/8- inch thick. Place it into a 9 or 10-inch pie plate fold the edges under and crimp. Dock the crust with a fork. Chill the formed crust in the freezer for 15 minutes or until very firm. Line the chilled crust with a piece of parchment paper and fill with pie weights or dried beans. Slide the crust into the oven and bake for 15 minutes or until the edges are golden and crisp. Carefully remove the parchment paper and weights then bake the crust for 10-15 more minutes or until light golden all over. If the crust puffs up at all while baking gently press it back into the pan with an offset spatula or fork. Let the crust cool slightly while you prepare the filling.

Turn the oven down to 350ºF. 

Whisk all of the filling ingredients together until well combined. Then strain the mixture through a fine mesh sieve for maximum smoothness.

 Put the baked pie shell on a baking sheet, then pour the filling mixture into the shell. Slide the pan into the oven and bake until the filling is slightly puffed and the center wiggles just slightly when you shake the pan, about 30 minutes. Cool the pie completely before serving with a dollop of whipped cream.

 

Butternut Miso Soup with Arame and Wasabi

  You know that game where you give someone a word and they have to make up a story with that word in it? I’m like that, except with food. Give me an ingredient, and magically, as if out of nowhere, an entire recipe (or […]

The post Butternut Miso Soup with Arame and Wasabi appeared first on My New Roots.

 

You know that game where you give someone a word and they have to make up a story with that word in it? I’m like that, except with food. Give me an ingredient, and magically, as if out of nowhere, an entire recipe (or several!) will appear in my head. I could even give you the amount of salt it needs, how the vegetables should be sliced, the oven temp, and what it should be garnished with. It’s a tad psycho, but my best party trick hands down.

When my friend Christiann Koepke emailed me about coming to visit her in Portland, driving to the Pacific coast, and photographing some recipes together, I was all in. And then when she suggested we put seaweed into something (because ocean) it was like someone had opened the flood gates in my brain and alllll the ideas came rushing to me. Neat! And very convenient.

But what do we really want to eat at the beach when it’s chilly and maybe windy, maybe raining, maybe freezing-raining (it is the Pacific Northwest, after all)? The answer is soup. And I knew it was going to be a creamy, dreamy, sea veggie-kissed broth with all the tasty toppings.

 

 

When seaweed is a featured ingredient in a recipe, I tend to channel Asian flavours like miso, ginger, wasabi, toasted sesame, to compliment to the unmistakably briny, salty, ocean-y flavour of seaweed. Eaten as a staple food throughout China and Japan for thousands of years, sea vegetables are rich in essential minerals, trace minerals, chlorophyll, iodine, fiber, and lots of protein. Some sea vegetables even contain vitamin B12 – a rare element for a plant!

Sea vegetables are less complex than their land-dwelling relatives. Without intricate root systems or tissues, seaweeds get their nutrients from the waters they grow in. To survive, they form root-like parts to attach themselves to rocks or other stable elements. There are three categories of sea vegetables; brown, red, and green. Brown algae thrive in cool water at depths of around 50 feet. The most commonly known brown seaweed is kelp, which can grow up to 1,500 feet (500 meters) long! Red algae, like dulse, contain elements that can gel foods. Green sea vegetables bridge the gap between land and sea plants, as they can store food as starch, just like vegetation found out of the water. The most popular kind of green algae is nori, which is what your sushi comes wrapped in.   

 


Seaweeds range in flavours from mild to wild. Some are sweet and nutty, while others are pungent, funky, and an acquired taste. If you’re a seaweed newb (which most Westerners are), I suggest starting out with a less challenging one, like arame.
Arame is in the “brown” category of sea vegetables, but when you buy it, it will appear closer to jet black. It has a stringy texture, and almost looks like wiry hair, but will soften into tender, noodle-y strands after being soaked. Before it is packaged, arame must be cooked for seven hours, and then dried in the sun. To use, simply re-hydrate by soaking it in room temperature water for 10-15 minutes until it is soft and has doubled in volume. Arame is very high in calcium, rich in iron, potassium, vitamin A and the B vitamins. And like other brown seaweeds, arame contains sodium alginate, a compound that helps to convert heavy metals in the body into harmless salt, which is easily excreted.

Besides soup, I like to put arame in stews, stir fries, and salads (here’s a great recipe from the archives…check out that incredible food photography!). The flavor of arame is saline and a bit funky, but mostly sweet. The texture is like an al dente pasta, and I think it adds amazing “meaty-ness” to a dish, with its satisfying chew.

 

 

This soup is well balanced, and hits all the notes: sweet and creamy from the butternut, savoury from miso, chewy from the arame, warming from the ginger, spicy from the wasabi, and nutty and crunchy from the toasted sesame. You could theoretically use any kind of winter squash here, like a Hokkaido pumpkin, acorn or delicate squash. Scale back on the ginger and perhaps leave out the wasabi if you’re making this for kiddos. And if you don’t have arame, or you’re simply not into sea vegetables, leave it out, or replace with some coconut bacon. It should be noted that once you’ve added the miso to the soup base, it’s important that you don’t let it boil if you reheat it. Miso is contains delicate probiotics and enzymes that will be destroyed by high heat. The soup freezes well, but leave the wasabi out until you serve it since the flavour will fade if once it’s frozen.

 

 

 

 


 

Christiann and I had such an incredible time at the ocean, pulling this whole miracle off together. The weather – although abysmal every other day that week – was beyond beautiful from the moment we set foot on the sand, to the second we decided it was time to call it a night (and then it started pouring, ha!). We caught an epic sunset by the fire, exhausted and so grateful for the stars aligning in every way possible, to make this day possible. And it was such an honour to work alongside a photographer that has inspired me for years – if you haven’t checked out her genius yet, here is a link to her website and Instagram.

Thank you, Christiann for making this dream a reality! I had such a blast! We have another post coming up in the New Year I cannot wait to share it with you, dear friends.

Big love to all and I hope autumn is treating you well. Happy American Thanksgiving to all my loves stateside!
xo, Sarah B

photo credits: images 4, 6, 7, 8, 9 Christiann Koepke

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The post Butternut Miso Soup with Arame and Wasabi appeared first on My New Roots.

Our Late Summer Wedding

A huge thank you to our amazing Photographer Brandon Werth For capturing these beautiful Images from our wedding day. ALl images are ©Brandon Werth.

A huge thank you to our amazing Photographer  Brandon Werth  For capturing these beautiful Images from our wedding day. ALl images are © Brandon Werth .

A huge thank you to our amazing Photographer Brandon Werth For capturing these beautiful Images from our wedding day. ALl images are ©Brandon Werth.

As our families might tell you, our wedding day, August 11th, was a long time coming. After dating for eight and a half years (surviving two years long distance, five moves between three cities, and buying a house together), the question wasn’t if Chris and I were going to get married, but when.

After finding out we were joyously expecting (!), our growing family gave us the nudge we needed to set a date and start planning. We both knew we wanted a small, intimate ceremony with our immediate family. Sharing our day with our closest loved ones felt the most special to us.

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With a wedding date set for little more than two months away, we threw ourselves into planning mode and managed to have a majority of the details solidified within a week. Growing up, I had dreams of an outdoor wedding. So, we crossed our fingers against the rain and chose a local arboretum for our ceremony, hoping to enjoy the garden in full bloom.

I thought my wedding dress would prove to be the most difficult, knowing that I had to buy a style off the rack (due to the short deadline) that would also accommodate a baby bump. Moreover, I am notoriously “particular” (as my mother would say). When my sister was married a couple years earlier, we joked how I would have to try on every dress in the city before I would find one.

Yet, despite the restrictions (or perhaps because of them), the second dress I tried on was “the one.”

Although we were working on a short timeline, the ease at which everything came together made it feel as if this was the way it was supposed to be.

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Unfortunately, the groom came down with the flu a few days before our wedding day. I kept myself quarantined, making frequent trips to the drug store hoping for some miracle medicine that would quickly cure him. Despite our best efforts, Chris still woke up with a fever on our wedding day. We half-joked that we would have a “first hug” instead of a “first kiss.”

While we had crossed our fingers against rain, we had forgotten to cross them against the flu as well. But, after all, we are committing in sickness and in health, right?

Even so, once the day got started, the whirlwind of getting ready and setting everything up captured our attention and left little room for worrying.

Although I expected to feel nervous about getting married, when the moment was in front of me I found I was pretty calm. After spending so many years together, our life together was already comforting and familiar.

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We blocked off a couple hours before the ceremony for photographs, starting with a “first look” in the fern garden. The day may have been hot and humid, but the light was perfect (scattered gently through a Canadian wildfire haze that dappled the ground with occasional pockets of sunlight, before breaking against a clear sky). The time flew by as we wandered the grounds, laughing with our photographer (illness forgotten), and enjoying the last few moments before becoming husband and wife. We picked up a few “friends” along the way, as the tulle on my dress proved to be excellent material for capturing insects of all shapes and sizes.

After taking a few minutes to freshen up (and for my mother to guide the bug friends out from under the layers of tulle), it was time for the big event.

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A month earlier, Chris and I made the decision to write our own ceremony, personalizing the details and readings on our relationship together. Instead of the traditional exchange of rings, we chose to “tie the knot,” to signify our two separate lives becoming one. The ceremony ended with our exchange of personal vows. It was short, sweet, and sentimental.

With Ella Fitzgerald’s At Last to send us off—after eight years together it was about time—we were official.

We ended the evening in a private room at a local restuarant, enjoying the several courses of food and family in equal measure.

Our wedding day may have been untraditional in many ways, but it was perfect for us.

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Sister Pie’s Buttermilk Pumpkin Streusel Pie

“You will lose someone you can’t live without, and your heart will be badly broken, and the bad news is that you never completely get over the loss of your beloved. But this is also the good news. They live forever in your broken heart that doesn’t seal back up. And you come through. It’s… Read more »

“You will lose someone you can’t live without, and your heart will be badly broken, and the bad news is that you never completely get over the loss of your beloved. But this is also the good news. They live forever in your broken heart that doesn’t seal back up. And you come through. It’s like having a broken leg that never heals perfectly—that still hurts when the weather gets cold, but you learn to dance with the limp.”
― Anne Lamott

 

I think I need this year to feel different. Because it is different.

For the first time Grandma won’t be the one bringing the pumpkin pie to the Thanksgiving table. She won’t walk through the door with a bag of Lay’s potato chips and her 9×13 glass Pyrex dish that houses a perfect pie. I won’t hear her insist the crust didn’t bake right or listen to her tell me how I could have done so much better. She’s wrong. Try as I might my pumpkin pie is never as good as Grandma’s even though I use her crust recipe; the one with no butter but lots of oil and a splash of milk. I even buy the can of Libby’s pumpkin pureé and follow the recipe off of the can because that is what Grandma does.

Did. I can’t seem to get used to that damn past tense.

This year is different. We knew someday it would be but what surprises me is that I’m finding myself wanting to lean into the difference. That was Grandma’s pumpkin pie and when I recreate it something is missing. Some recipes, perhaps, are best to live in memory. Maybe next year I’ll be ready to make her pie again but this year it still feels like it belongs to her.

The last time I saw her I held her hand and fingered her silver hair as she gasped her few final breaths. She was never very good at receiving praise so I took the opportunity I could to tell her how much I love her and how proud I am to be her granddaughter. She still felt like she was fighting. Her breathing, peaceful at times and then she’d dig deep for a breath. Wanting to release her I leaned in and whispered, “It’s okay Grandma, I’ll bake the pie now.”

It’s nearly Thanksgiving and while I want to honor that promise, making her pie feels like too great a task. I can’t bear for it to not be the same as it has been my entire life.

Last month, while in New Orleans, Joy and I spent a good bit of time flipping through the pages of the Sister Pie cookbook. Together she and I baked the Apple Pie with the Gruyere Crust but I took a quick photo on my phone of the Buttermilk Pumpkin Pie with the buckwheat streusel. The same day I made that beloved Collard Greens Melt I baked up this pie to see if it could be a possible contender for the holiday table.

It’s familiar, which for this holiday I do believe is essential, and yet different enough that I didn’t find myself comparing it to the one I’ve had for the last 36 years. There’s a subtle tang that intrigues and a warming crunch as you bite into the buttery spiced crumble. It’s a soft nod to tradition while gentling reminding us that life evolves. In our purest moments we are present because we know it won’t always be that way. We’re continuing to build new memories while still honoring those of the past.

Even if my pumpkin pie is not her’s I know she is still so very proud.

 

Sister Pie’s Buttermilk Pumpkin Streusel Pie

Yield 8 Servings

This recipe comes directly from the book. It’s a beauty. Loaded with inventive recipes and unique twists on the classes. Also, pie dough cookies! 

Ingredients

1 recipe single crust pie dough (I’m partial to my latest recipe in Let’s Stay In or you could use this one)

Buckwheat Pepita Streusel Topping

1⁄2 cup all-purpose flour

1⁄4 cup buckwheat flour

1⁄4 cup pepitas, toasted in a dry skillet

1 teaspoon ground cinnamon

1⁄4 cup packed light brown sugar

1⁄4 teaspoon kosher salt

1⁄2 cup (1 stick) unsalted butter, straight from the fridge

Pumpkin Pie Filling

1 (15-ounce) can pumpkin puree

3⁄4 cup buttermilk, at room temperature

3 large eggs, at room temperature

2 tablespoons Grade B maple syrup

2 tablespoons (1⁄4 stick) unsalted butter, melted and cooled

2 tablespoons fine yellow cornmeal

3⁄4 cup packed light brown sugar

1⁄2 teaspoon kosher salt

1⁄2 teaspoon ground cinnamon

1⁄2 teaspoon ground ginger

1 large egg, beaten

Instructions

Blind Bake:

Roll out your chilled pie dough into a large rough circle. Roll the dough around your rolling pin, then lay over your pie dough. Cut any excess dough off then fold in the edges and crimp the dough between your fingers. Place in the freezer and chill for 15 minutes.

Preheat your oven to 450°F with the rack on the lowest level. Remove the pie crust from the freezer, tear off a square of parchment that is slightly larger than the pie shell, and gently fit it into the frozen crust. Fill the crust with sugar (yes, sugar, this is a genius tip I learned from Stella Parks from Bravetart. Read more about it here.) and place the pie pan on a baking sheet. Transfer the baking sheet to the oven and bake for 25 to 27 minutes. Check for doneness by peeling up a piece of parchment—the crimps should be light golden brown. Remove the baking sheet from the oven and transfer to a cooling rack. After 6 minutes, carefully remove the foil and beans. You did it! You are now ready to fill the pie.

PUMPKIN PIE

Preheat your oven to 325°F. Line two baking sheets with parchment paper.

Make the streusel topping: In a mixing bowl, combine the all-purpose and buckwheat flours, pepitas, cinnamon, brown sugar, and salt. Place the butter in the bowl and coat on all sides with the flour mixture. Take a bench scraper and cut the butter into 1⁄2-inch cubes directly into the flour mixture in the bowl. Work to break up the cubes with your hands until they are lightly coated with the flour mixture. Continue to use the bench scraper to cut the cubes into smaller pieces—the idea is that you are cutting each cube in half.

Switch to a pastry blender and begin to cut in the butter with one hand while turning the bowl with the other. It’s important not to aim for the same spot at the bottom of the bowl with each movement, but to actually slice through butter every time. You’ll need to clean out the pastry blender every few turns of the bowl. Once most of the butter is incorporated, use your fingers to fully break down the butter until it is no longer visible. Be careful not to overwork the mixture at this point. Scatter the streusel over one of the parchment-lined baking sheets, distributing it evenly, and transfer the baking sheet to the oven. Bake for approximately 25 minutes, gently tossing the mixture with a spatula about halfway through. When the streusel is evenly browned and does not appear wet anymore, remove the baking sheet from the oven. Cool completely on a wire rack.

Make the filling: In a mixing bowl, combine the pumpkin, buttermilk, eggs, syrup, melted butter, cornmeal, brown sugar, salt, cinnamon, and ginger and whisk until well blended.

Place the blind-baked shell on the other parchment-lined baking sheet. Brush the crimped edge with the beaten egg. Pour the buttermilk-pumpkin filling into the pie shell until it reaches the bottom of the crimps. Transfer the baking sheet with the pie on it to the oven and bake for 50 to 60 minutes, until the edges are puffed and the center jiggles only slightly when shaken.

Remove the baking sheet from the oven and transfer the pie to a wire rack. Let cool for 15 minutes, then cover the pie with the streusel topping. Allow the pie to fully cool and set for another 4 to 6 hours. When the pie is at room temperature, slice it into 6 to 8 pieces and serve.

Store leftover pie, well wrapped in plastic wrap, in the refrigerator for up to 2 days.

Turkey and the Wolf’s Collard Green Melt

The thing about doing the same thing again is that you get a clear window into your growth as a person. Let me back up and try to have this make some semblance of sense. There I was in a hot yoga studio with plenty of bright natural light and bending myself into pretzel like… Read more »

The thing about doing the same thing again is that you get a clear window into your growth as a person. Let me back up and try to have this make some semblance of sense.

There I was in a hot yoga studio with plenty of bright natural light and bending myself into pretzel like positions for the very first time in my life. I’ve done yoga in the privacy of my own home with only my puppies watching me and judging my bent knees while attempting “downward dog”. But I was in New Orleans and Joy suggested we go to a yoga class. I gave a hearty yes and the enthusiasm was straight up sincere but that didn’t mean I didn’t feel uncomfortable about the situation. I did it and towards the end as we were a bit sweaty and asked to breathe and think about our intention for the day and to give ourselves the proper accolades for having just spent an hour getting sweaty and being all mindful tears welled up in my eyes. I felt peace and lightness in a season where I had not anticipated such a gift.

What a difference this book release has felt to the first one. With any firsts there are so many unknowns. I don’t know about you but I don’t do very well with unknown. If I knew what the end result would be then I could have so much more chill, unfortunately life is a journey with an unclear destination. Because of that though there is so much opportunity for growth (basically a positive way of saying a challenge).

I’ve learned a lot about my process and I’ve learned a lot about myself. In my younger years my first step was always to try and change myself in order to fit into the mold that I assumed was right. These days I’m assured in myself and now the goal is to set up my surroundings in order to fit myself. The point of all of this? Not sure exactly but I see growth and wanted to take a minute to celebrate that and also, I ate the best sandwiches of my life and I needed to share that with you all. Because you get me and you understand why this sandwich brought a literal tear to my eye.

I am not always hip to the latest coolest restaurants on the scene so before Joy mentioned lunch at Turkey and the Wolf I had no idea that Bon Appetit had named it the best restaurant in the country in 2017. Now I’m a full-fledged fan. We ordered the Bologna sandwich with layers of fried bologna, shrettuce (shredded lettuce), special sauce, american cheese and housemade vinegar potato chips. And we had the Collard Greens Melt. Back at Joy’s house later that evening I did some Googling and found the recipe on Bon Appetit. Immediately I ordered Duke’s Mayonnaise and Creole seasoning so it would be at my door by the time I arrived home.

Make this sandwich. Yes, time is involved but you can not deny the tears I cried.

 

The Collard Green Melt

Yield 4 sandwiches

From Turkey and The Wolf as printed on BonAppetit.com

I followed this recipe exactly as written from the site, although when I ate the leftovers I didn’t make it a triple decker as instructed here and it was just as delightful.

Ingredients

Collards

 

4 tablespoons unsalted butter

 

6 garlic cloves, finely chopped

 

½ cup red wine vinegar

 

¼ cup sugar

 

2 teaspoons Creole seasoning (such as Zatarain’s)

 

1 teaspoon kosher salt

 

1 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper

 

1 teaspoon crushed red pepper flakes

 

10 cups (packed) torn collard green leaves (from about 4 bunches)

Slaw

 

¼ head of green cabbage, thinly sliced

 

¼ small white or yellow onion, thinly sliced

 

⅓ cup mayonnaise

 

1 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper

 

1 tablespoon (or more) distilled white vinegar

 

Kosher salt

Russian Dressing

 

½ cup mayonnaise

 

¼ cup chopped pickled hot cherry peppers

 

1 teaspoon hot sauce

 

1 teaspoon ketchup

 

⅛ teaspoon freshly ground black pepper

Assembly

 

12 thin slices caraway rye or whole wheat bread

 

8 thick-cut slices deli-style Swiss cheese

Instructions

Collards

 

Melt butter in a large saucepan over medium heat. Cook garlic, stirring, until fragrant, about 1 minute. Add vinegar, sugar, Creole seasoning, salt, black pepper, red pepper flakes, and ¼ cup water. Bring to a simmer and cook, stirring occasionally, until liquid is slightly reduced, about 10 minutes. Add collards, tossing in liquid to wilt. Cover pan, reduce heat to low, and continue to cook, stirring occasionally, until collards are dark green and very soft, 2½–3 hours. There should be very little liquid left—just enough to coat greens. If there is too much, cook uncovered until you have the right amount.

 

Do Ahead: Collards can be made 3 days ahead. Let cool; cover and chill.

Slaw

 

Toss cabbage, onion, mayonnaise, pepper, and 1 Tbsp. vinegar in a medium bowl to combine. Cover and chill at least 1 hour.

 

Season with salt and more vinegar if needed just before using.

 

Do Ahead: Slaw can be made 1 day ahead. Keep chilled.

Russian Dressing

 

Mix mayonnaise, cherry peppers, hot sauce, ketchup, and pepper in a small bowl to combine.

 

Do Ahead: Dressing can be made 1 day ahead. Cover and chill.

Assembly

 

Heat broiler (rack should be in highest position). Place 8 slices of bread on a rimmed baking sheet and toast, checking every 30 seconds, until golden brown, 1–2 minutes. Turn and toast second side until golden brown, 1–2 minutes. Top each toast with a slice of cheese and broil until melted and starting to brown, 1–2 minutes. Transfer to a work surface.

 

Place remaining 4 slices of bread on same baking sheet and toast, checking every 30 seconds, until golden brown, 1–2 minutes. Turn and toast second side until golden brown, 1–2 minutes. Transfer to a plate.

 

If collard greens are cold, reheat in a large skillet over medium until hot, about 5 minutes.

 

Divide 2 cups slaw among 4 cheesy toasts. Top with remaining 4 cheesy toasts. Using a slotted spoon (or you’ll end up with a soggy sammy), divide collard greens among cheesy toasts. Generously spread one side of plain toasts with dressing and place dressing side down on collard greens to close sandwiches. Cut sandwiches in half diagonally and serve with lots of napkins.