Gingerbread and Lingonberry Bundt Cake

Just putting this up here before we are checking out for some Christmas celebrations with Luise’s family.

This is a  our gingerbread bundt cake that we have been making a couple times in December leading up to Christmas.

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Just putting this up here before we are checking out for some Christmas celebrations with Luise’s family. This is a  our gingerbread bundt cake that we have been making a couple times in December leading up to Christmas. It’s a gluten free, spice heavy, bundt cake with a touch of sweet banana bread. Very soft and moist and very, very good. We add tangy nordic lingonberries to the cake and the glaze to give it a pop in flavor and color but you can leave them out if you like. Or replace them with other berries like cranberries or raspberries.

The glaze is rather untraditional, made on dates, plant milk, coconut oil and berries. It doesn’t shine as the ones made on sugar but super delicious nevertheless. Perfect if you are trying to keep the sugar down. You could of course add any glaze of choice to it.

Try this for Christmas Day or New Year’s Eve with a little glaze on top and some extra on the side.

Happy holidays everyone!

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[full_width padding=”50px 0 50px 0″]Gingerbread and Lingonberry Bundt Cake[/full_width]

[one_half]Dry ingredients
90 g / 250 ml / 1 cup rolled oats
100 g / 250 ml / 1 cup almond flour
135 g / 250 ml / 1 cup rice flour
2 tsp baking powder
1 tbsp ground cinnamon
2 tsp ground cardamom
2 tsp ground ginger
1/2 tsp ground cloves
A pinch of salt

Wet ingredients
2 ripe bananas
125 ml / 1/2 cup maple syrup
3 eggs
125 g / 1 stick / 4 oz butter, room tempered
200 ml / 3/4 cup yogurt
120 g frozen lingonberries or cranberries (optional)

Lingonberry & Date Glaze
10 soft dates
250 ml / 1 cup oat milk or almond milk
2 tbsp coconut oil
60 g /1/2 cup lingonberries[/one_half]

[one_half_last]Making the cake
1. Set the oven to 180°C.
2. Place the oats in a food processor and pulse into a flour.
3. Add the rest of the dry ingredients and pulse a few times until combined. Transfer to a large bowl.
4. Add all wet ingredients except the lingonberries to the food processor and mix on high speed until smooth and creamy.
5. Pour the wet mixture into the bowl with dry ingredients and stir around until combined.
6. Stir through the berries.
7. Grease a bundt pan with oil or butter.
8. Pour the batter into the pan and bake on the lower rack for [55 minutes](55 “The cake is ready if an inserted toothpick comes out clean”) or until a toothpick comes out clean.
9. Let cool in the pan for 15 minutes, then flip onto a wire cooling rack, carefully lift the bundt pan off and let cool completely.

Making the Glaze
1. Pit the dates and add to a sauce pan on medium heat.
2. Add milk and coconut oil and let simmer for a few minutes until thickened.
3. Remove from the heat and add the berries, leave for a couple of minutes to cool off a bit.
4. Transfer to a blender or use a hand blender to mix completely smooth with a dusty pink color. Add more liquid if it looks too thick.
5. Pour half of the glaze over the cake before serving and serve the rest on the side.[/one_half_last]

 

Gingerbread Cookies

My favorite gingerbread cookies have…

181220_GingerbreadZI4A8462 1.jpg gingerbread cookies | apt 2b baking co

My favorite gingerbread cookies have been up on the site, but a little hidden within another post, for a long time. So, this year I decided to give them a little refresh and some new fun photos. These can be made into cookie ornaments too! Just make sure to bake them for an extra minute or two, until they are crisp and dark brown, and don’t forget to poke a hole in the cookies before baking. I love the contrast of the deep golden cookies and white icing so I tend to ice these guys really simply with lines and dots of royal icing and lots of sparkly sanding sugar.


Gingerbread Cookies with Royal Icing

makes about 3 dozen 3-inch cookies

adapted from Simply Recipes

3 1/4 cups (415g) all-purpose flour


3/4 teaspoon baking soda

2 teaspoons ground ginger


2 teaspoons ground cinnamon 

1/2 teaspoon ground cardamom

1/4 teaspoon finely grated nutmeg

1/4  teaspoon finely ground black pepper 

1/4  teaspoon allspice


1 teaspoon kosher salt


14 tablespoons (200g) unsalted butter, softened

1/2 cup (110g) packed dark brown sugar 

1 large egg


1/2 cup unsulfured molasses 


In a large bowl, whisk the flour, baking soda, salt and spices together. 

In a stand mixer, cream the butter and sugar together until light and fluffy. Add the egg, then the molasses and mix until well combined. With the mixer on low speed, gradually add the flour mixture and mix until thoroughly combined. Divide the dough in half, wrap each half in plastic and refrigerate for at least one hour before rolling.


Heat oven to 350ºF and line two baking sheets with parchment paper.

Working with 1/2 of the dough at a time roll the dough 1/8-1/4-inch thick on a lightly floured surface using a lightly floured rolling pin roll. Use a cookie cutter or stencil to cut out desired shapes then place them on the prepared baking sheets. For cookie ornaments, use a skewer to poke a hole through the top of the cookies before baking.
Bake for 8-10 minutes or until the edges of the cookies have just barely begun to brown. For cookie ornaments bake the cookies until they are lightly browned all over and firm to the touch. Cool the cookies on the sheet pans for a few minutes and then transfer to a cooling rack
to cool completely. Decorate as desired.

Royal Icing

1 pound confectioners sugar, sifted

6 tablespoons pasteurized egg whites

1 teaspoon lemon juice

1 teaspoon vanilla extract

pinch salt

For the Icing

In the bowl of a stand mixer fitted with the whisk attachment combine all of the ingredients. Whisk on low speed until the sugar is moistened, then turn the mixer up to medium and whisk until smooth and glossy. 

For piping lines and shapes you’ll want thick icing. When you lift the whisk out of the bowl the icing should flow in thick ribbons that will hold their shape when they fall into the bowl below. Add a bit more confectioner’s sugar to the mixture if necessary to achieve this texture. Fill a piping bag with the icing and have fun!

For flooding and complete coverage of the cookies you’ll want thinner icing that holds its shape for a few seconds, then melts into the icing in the bowl. Add a bit more water, one teaspoon at a time to achieve this texture. Color the icing as desired.

Use the icing right away or store in an airtight container, with a piece of plastic wrap pressed against the surface to prevent a skin from forming, in the refrigerator for up to 3 days. Stir until smooth before using. Color the icing as desired.,


Royal Icing Tips and Tricks

Fit a piping bag with a small round tip #1 or #2 to pipe lines and shapes and/or another piping bag with a slightly larger tip #3 or #4 for flooding. Fill each bag with the corresponding icing and have fun! Practice on a piece of parchment paper if you are nervous, but truly if you think you messed up - just cover your cookies with sprinkles! 

For the trees in this post I used the flooding icing to draw a line around the border of each cookie, then filled it in completely and sprinkled to my heart’s content. After the trees had dried slightly I went back and used the piping icing to draw the trunks. 

You can also use a spoon to cover the cookies with thinner flooding icing or dip them, have fun! Don’t worry to much about it!

If you are adding sanding sugar or sprinkles to your iced cookies you’ll want to add them just after you pipe the icing. Royal icing will develop a dry skin very quickly, so have your sprinkles at the ready.

If you’d like to pipe lines that sit on top on top of flooded cookies, let the flooding icing dry all of the way or the lines will melt into the flooded icing.

In any case make sure to let the cookies dry all of the way, uncovered, before stacking or packaging, I like to leave mine overnight.

gingerbread cookies | apt 2b baking co

Cut Out Sugar Cookies

My biggest cookie decorating advice is make sure the cookies are delicious, pick a limited color palate for your icing and sprinkles, and don’t worry too much about it! Have fun! M…

cut out sugar cookies | apt 2b baking co

My biggest cookie decorating advice is make sure the cookies are delicious, pick a limited color palate for your icing and sprinkles, and don’t worry too much about it! Have fun! Make a mess! Cover everything with sprinkles!

These are the most delicious and tender cut out cookies I’ve ever made. They have a combination of sugars and a few extra egg yolks which give them excellent flavor and texture. I add a little bit of almond extract too, but it’s totally optional.

I’ve also included some royal icing tips below, but again, my best advice is don’t worry about it too much and have fun. It takes some practice pipe perfectly.

Cut Out Sugar Cookies

makes about 3 dozen cookies, depending on size

adapted from Holiday Cookies by Elisabet Der Nederlanden

These cookies are tender, buttery and delicious. Decorate them with royal icing, leave them plain, or if you’d like to sprinkle the un-iced cookies add the sprinkles or sanding sugar before baking. Press very lightly to adhere the sprinkles to the dough.

3 3/4 cups (480g) all purpose flour

1 1/4 teaspoons baking powder

1 teaspoon kosher salt

3/4 cup (170g) unsalted butter, softened

1 1/2 cups (300g) granulated sugar

1/2 cup (55g) confectioners sugar

2 eggs plus 2 egg yolks

1 tablespoon vanilla extract

1 teaspoon almond extract (optional)

Royal Icing

1 pound confectioners sugar, sifted

6 tablespoons pasteurized egg whites

1 teaspoon lemon juice

1 teaspoon vanilla extract

pinch salt

For the Cookies

Whisk the flour, baking powder, and salt together in a large bowl.

In the bowl of a stand mixer fitted with the paddle attachment, combine the butter and sugars and beat on medium speed until light and fluffy, about 3 minutes. Add the eggs and egg yolks one at a time, mixing until each egg is incorporated before adding the next. Add the vanilla. Stop the mixer and scrape down the bottom and sides of the bowl to ensure even mixing.

Add the flour mixture all at once and mix on low speed until incorporated. Turn the dough out onto a lightly floured countertop and divide it in half. Wrap each half in plastic wrap and refrigerate for at least 2 hours and up to 2 days before rolling.

When you are ready to bake, line 2 baking sheets with parchment paper. Heat oven to 350ºF and position 2 racks evenly spaced in the center of the oven.

Roll one of the chilled dough rounds out onto a lightly floured surface just under 1/4-inch thick. Use cookie cutters to cut as many cookies as possible. Carefully transfer them to the prepared baking sheets, leaving about 1 1/2-inches in between the cookies. Gather up the scraps and roll and cut another round of cookies. Refrigerate the cut cookies for about 15 minutes before baking.

Repeat with the second round of dough.

Bake the cookies for 15-20 minutes or until they are light golden. Rotate the racks from from to back and top to bottom. The baking time will depend quite a bit on the size of the cookies so if yours are quite large or small, they may take more or less baking time.

Transfer the baking sheets to cooling racks and let sit for five minutes. Transfer the cookies to racks to cool completely before icing.

For the Icing

In the bowl of a stand mixer fitted with the whisk attachment combine all of the ingredients. Whisk on low speed until the sugar is moistened, then turn the mixer up to medium and whisk until smooth and glossy.

For piping lines and shapes you’ll want thick icing. When you lift the whisk out of the bowl the icing should flow in thick ribbons that will hold their shape when they fall into the bowl below. Add a bit more confectioner’s sugar to the mixture if necessary to achieve this texture. Fill a piping bag with the icing and have fun!

For flooding and complete coverage of the cookies you’ll want thinner icing that holds its shape for a few seconds, then melts into the icing in the bowl. Add a bit more water, one teaspoon at a time to achieve this texture. Color the icing as desired.

Use the icing right away or store in an airtight container, with a piece of plastic wrap pressed against the surface to prevent a skin from forming, in the refrigerator for up to 3 days. Stir until smooth before using. Color the icing as desired.

Royal Icing Tips and Tricks

Fit a piping bag with a small round tip #1 or #2 to pipe lines and shapes and/or another piping bag with a slightly larger tip #3 or #4 for flooding. Fill each bag with the corresponding icing and have fun! Practice on a piece of parchment paper if you are nervous, but truly if you think you messed up - just cover your cookies with sprinkles!

For the trees in this post I used the flooding icing to draw a line around the border of each cookie, then filled it in completely and sprinkled to my heart’s content. After the trees had dried slightly I went back and used the piping icing to draw the trunks.

You can also use a spoon to cover the cookies with thinner flooding icing or dip them, have fun! Don’t worry to much about it!

If you are adding sanding sugar or sprinkles to your iced cookies you’ll want to add them just after you pipe the icing. Royal icing will develop a dry skin very quickly, so have your sprinkles at the ready.

If you’d like to pipe lines that sit on top on top of flooded cookies, let the flooding icing dry all of the way or the lines will melt into the flooded icing.

In any case make sure to let the cookies dry all of the way, uncovered, before stacking or packaging, I like to leave mine overnight.

cut out sugar cookies | apt 2b baking co

Healthyish Salted Caramel Turtles

  Everyone has strong food memories around holidays or special occasions in their life. I can completely recall the distinct taste of boxed cake from my childhood birthdays. Summer vacations were steeped in melting grape juice popsicles made by my grandmother. And one of my […]

The post Healthyish Salted Caramel Turtles appeared first on My New Roots.

 

Everyone has strong food memories around holidays or special occasions in their life. I can completely recall the distinct taste of boxed cake from my childhood birthdays. Summer vacations were steeped in melting grape juice popsicles made by my grandmother. And one of my favourite treats during Christmas, was undoubtedly Turtle chocolates. The iconic striped box was always within arms reach during the holidays, so as soon as the tree went up, it was like a Pavlovian response…the Turtle cravings began! If you live outside of North America, you may not be familiar with these pecan-chocolate-caramels (and for this, I feel very sad for you), but today, rejoice! I’m posting my own version, which is a healthier spin on this classic candy that you can whip up yourself with just six simple ingredients.

The original Turtle candies are relatively basic: pecans, caramel, and chocolate, but seemingly so much more than the sum of these parts. There is a magical synergy in this trinity, each ingredient complimenting and highlighting the others in perfect union. There isn’t much to improve upon, so my mission was clearly to health-ify the caramel and find some high-quality chocolate to steer us all away from refined sugar, modified milk ingredients, and emulsifiers. Blech.

I started off on my journey by looking online and found that healthyish Turtle recipes exist, but they all use dates and I didn’t want that to be the predominant flavour. Plus, I knew that the caramel needed some serious creaminess, so I started by blending up cashew butter with vanilla as the base, then added brown rice syrup to achieve that distinctive gooey-ness that makes Turtles so crave-able. The results were sooooo right on the money, confirmed by several of my closest, discerning friends, lined up to taste test.

 

 

Pecans are one of my favourite nuts because they are tender-crisp and so naturally sweet. I love them in baked goods like pecan pie, on top of waffles or pancakes, or in candies like these babies!

Pecans are native to North America, and grow in tough, wood-like shells on large, sprawling trees, some of which can live up to 200 years. The name pecan is a Native American word used to describe nuts that require a stone to crack – but you can easily open them by crushing two of their hard shells together.

Along with macadamias, pecans contain the lowest amount of protein (5-10%) and the highest amount of fat (80-95%) of all the nuts. The fat that they do contain however, is mostly monounsaturated, with some polyunsaturated fat as well. Pecans are high in minerals, like manganese, copper, and zinc. They also contain a good amount of fiber and protein.

There are a wide variety of pecans, but if you live outside North America, you may only have access to one type. That’s okay! The thing to look for is shelled pecans that are uniform in size and colour. Check the date on the package or bulk bin, and smell the nuts beforehand if you’re able to – they should be sweet, and well, nutty. If you’re shopping in bulk, visit a shop that has a high turnover to ensure that the nuts are fresh. Once you get them home, store shelled pecans in an airtight container at room temperature for up to six months (although try to eat them sooner) and in the freezer for up to a year. Pecans are highly susceptible to absorbing other smells, so keep them locked up tight in glass to prevent them from tasting like garlic, onions, or last night’s casserole.

 

 

I had hesitations about using brown rice syrup in this recipe, since I know it’s one of those harder-to-find ingredients, but it’s just SO perfect in this context that I had to! If you cannot find brown rice syrup, try whipped or creamed honey in its place. I recognize that this isn’t an alternative for vegans, but I think it is the only sweetener that would work due to how thick and viscous it is. If the caramel is too runny, if will be impossible to work with. Trust.

It’s best to store your Turtles in the freezer, and take them out about 10-15 minutes before serving. They’re also fine at room temperature, but will keep better cold. I actually dig them a little on the frozen side – the caramel is extra thick and chewy at subzero temperatures!

 

 



This will be my last post before the New Year, my friends! I’m off to Bali in a mere 10 days (!!!) and words cannot describe how excited I am for the Wild Heart High Spirit Retreat, and meeting women from all across the world. If you’d like to know more about my retreats, visit the Golden Circle Retreats website. We’re planning another round for 2019, so sign up to mailing our list to be the first notified when we announce the dates.

We are also taking orders for the Life-Changing Loaf of Bread Subscription Box! What better way to start off the new year than with a delicious monthly gift of health to yourself? If you want to learn more, or place your order, visit the shop page here.

All love from Canada, and happiest of holidays to you and yours!

xo, Sarah B

The post Healthyish Salted Caramel Turtles appeared first on My New Roots.

Sister Pie’s Buttered Rum Shortbread

These slice and bake cookies are my favorite sort of thing to put in a cookie assortment because they are so easy to make and so sneakily delicious. You might see a light brown rou…

Buttered Rum Shortbread | apt 2b baking co

These slice and bake cookies are my favorite sort of thing to put in a cookie assortment because they are so easy to make and so sneakily delicious. You might see a light brown round like this on a cookie plate and pass it up for something a little more exciting looking or powdered sugar coated, but when you take a bite you will be so pleasantly surprised. They are lightly spiced, crisp, and buttery with a little kick of rum, because Christmas. I also added a sprinkle of crushed freeze dried raspberries - you know - for flair. Bonus: they also stay fresh for quite awhile and the flavors get even better after a day or two.

The recipe comes from Sister Pie, a cookbook that came out this Fall, which is filled with so many incredible sounding recipes. I admit, I haven’t made a Sister Pie yet, but I’m sure the flavors are as spot on as these cookies!


Sister Pie’s Buttered Rum Shortbread

Makes 36 cookies

From Sister Pie by Lisa Ludwinski

I made a few small changes to Lisa’s recipe - I used browned butter in the icing instead of coconut oil and added sprinkle of dehydrated raspberries after I glazed the cookies, I also added 1/2 teaspoon more salt to the shortbread dough. The recipe that follows is straight from the book without my mods.

Shortbread

2 1/4 cups all purpose flour

1/2 teaspoon cinnamon

1/2 teaspoon nutmeg

1/4 teaspoon cloves

1/2 teaspoon kosher salt

1 cup unsalted butter, room temperature

3/4 cup powdered sugar

2 Tablespoons dark or spiced rum

1/2 teaspoon vanilla extract  

Rum Icing

3/4 cup powdered sugar plus more as needed

2 teaspoons coconut oil, melted

2 teaspoons dark or spiced rum

2 tablespoons heavy cream, plus more as needed

1/4 teaspoon kosher salt

1/4 teaspoon cloves

Mix the dough. In a medium bowl, whisk together the flour, cinnamon, nutmeg, cloves, and salt. Set aside.

Place the butter and powdered sugar in the bowl of a stand mixer fitted with the paddle attachment and cream on medium speed for about 3 minutes, until very smooth with no visible chunks of butter.

Use a silicone spatula to scrape down the bowl, then add the rum and vanilla and mix until just incorporated. Add the flour mixture all at once and mix on low speed until completely incorporated. Remove the dough from the bowl and shape into a cylindrical log approximately 1 1/2-inches in diameter. Wrap tightly in plastic wrap and refrigerate for at least 40 minutes. You can mix and shape the dough up to 2 days in advance and store it in the refrigerator until 1 hour before you intend to slice the dough. Alternately, you may freeze the dough for up to 3 months, then let it thaw in the refrigerator overnight before proceeding with the recipe.

Preheat your oven to 350ºF. Line two baking sheets with parchment paper.

Remove the dough from the refrigerator, unwrap it, and place on a cutting board. Using a sharp chef’s knife, slice the cookies about 1/4-inch thick. Carefully transfer them to the parchment-lined baking sheets.

Place the baking sheets in the oven and bake for 14 to 16 minutes, until the edges are just slightly golden.

Remove the baking sheets from the oven and transfer the cookies to wire racks to cool.

Make the Icing. While the cookies are cooling, in a medium bowl, whisk together the powdered sugar, coconut oil, rum, cream, salt, and cloves until very smooth. The texture should remind you of Elmer’s glue. Yum! If the icing seems a little dry, whisk in a bit more heavy cream, If it seems a little too wet, whisk in the powdered sugar, 1 tablespoon at a time.

Once the cookies have fully cooled, use a small offset spatula or knife to spread a very thin, even layer of icing across the tops of the cookies. It should be carefully smoothed, not gloppy. Return the cookies to the baking sheets to hive the icing a chance to set up before serving. Store the iced cookies in an airtight container for up to 1 week.



Walnut Linzer Cookies

walnut linzer cookies | apt 2b baking co walnut linzer cookies | apt 2b baking co walnut linzer cookies | apt 2b baking co walnut linzer cookies | apt 2b baking co

Linzer cookies are a holiday classic - usually made with almonds and raspberry jam as a nod to the Austrian Torte which they are named after. I took a few liberties here - swapping deeply toasted walnuts for the almonds and fig and currant jams for the raspberry so this is definitely a cookie where you can have some fun. Don’t have walnuts and fig jam? Try pecans or pistachios with strawberry or cranberry jam. If you are a home canner, I bet you have a few jars open in your fridge already. Feel free to use what you have. I used a round cookie cutter, and a couple of different sized round cutters for the centers of my cookies, but you could certainly use something a little more decorative. I also liked the look of cutting the centers purposely off-center, but it made the cookies tricky to move and they shifted in the oven a bit so I can’t say that I’d recommend it.


Walnut Linzer Cookies

Makes about 30 sandwich cookies

Slightly adapted from Holiday Cookies by Elisabet der Nederlanden

This nut-filled dough is delicious and delicate. Make sure to use enough bench flour that it doesn’t stick to your surface and handle it carefully when you are transfering the cookies to the baking sheets. I found a small offset spatula to be helpful with this task. These will loose their crispness after the first day, but are still delicious after a few days on the counter. Store them in an airtight container and redust with confectioner’s sugar if necessary.

1 1/4 cups (105g) chopped, deeply toasted walnuts

3/4 cup (150g) granulated sugar

1 teaspoon lemon zest

1 teaspoon kosher salt

2 1/4 cups all purpose flour

1 cup (225g) cold, unsalted butter cut into cubes

1 egg plus 1 egg yolk

2 teaspoons vanilla extract

1/3 cup jam

Confectioner’s sugar for dusting

In a food processor, combine the walnuts, sugar, lemon zest, and salt and pulse until the nuts are finely ground. Add the flour and pulse until well combined. Scatter the butter over the top and pulse until a few small pieces of butter remain. Add the egg, egg yolk, and vanilla. Pulse until the dough just starts to come together.

Turn the dough out onto a piece of plastic wrap, pat it into a square about 1-inch thick. Refrigerate for at least one hour and up to 2 days.

When you are ready to bake position 2 racks, evenly spaced, as close to the center of the oven as possible and heat the oven to 350ºF. Line two baking sheets with parchment paper.

Cut the dough in half and keep half of the dough in the refrigerator while you work. On a lightly floured surface, roll the dough to about 1/8-inch thick. Use a 2 1/2- inch round cookie cutter to cut as many circles as possible. Carefully transfer the rounds to the prepared baking sheets. Use a small circle or decorative cutter to cut the centers out of half of the cookies on the sheets. Gather up the scraps and repeat. Repeat with the other half of the dough. Chill the cut cookies for 10 minutes before baking.

Bake the cookies 17-19 minutes or until barely golden. Rotate the sheets from top to bottom and front to back halfway through baking. Transfer the sheets to cooling racks and let the cookies cool for 5 minutes then transfer the cookies to racks to cool completely.

Use a fine mesh sieve to dust the cooled cookies with a cutout with confectioner’s sugar. Spoon about 1/2 teaspoon of the jam on each of the other cookies. Top the jammed cookie with the sugared cookie and serve.


Snuk Foods sent me the incredible fig jam I used in these cookies - you can find it on their site (alongside tons of amazing International pantry items!) HERE.

walnut linzer cookies | apt 2b baking co walnut linzer cookies | apt 2b baking co

Stamped Brownie Cookies

Stamped Brownie Cookies | apt 2b baking co Stamped Brownie Cookies | apt 2b baking co Stamped Brownie Cookies | apt 2b baking co

Last year I fell in love with stamped gingerbread cookies so this year I was primed and ready for another stampable cookie for my holiday packages. I find that darker doughs - like chocolate or gingerbread are the most dramatic when glazed, so I went for deep rich chocolate with both Dutch process and black cocoas. You can stamp just about any cut out cookie dough that holds it’s shape while baking though, so if you’ve invested in stamps try out a few doughs. And alternately, these cookies are absolutely gorgeous when stamped and glazed, but also work well as cut out cookies without a stamp. Happy Baking! I’ll be back soon with more cookies!


Stamped Brownie Cookies

makes about 3 dozen cookies, depending on the size

Slightly adapted from Smitten Kitchen’s Brownie Roll-Out Cookies

These soft and chewy chocolate cookies are gorgeous when stamped, but also work well as cut out cookies if you don’t have a stamp. Flavor the glaze however you like, but a little peppermint and vanilla is nice for the holidays. I bet a little bit of espresso powder instead would be just delicious. Make sure to not over bake the cookies, they’ll lose their chew and will be more of a standard sugar cookie. I found 7 minutes in my oven was just right, but keep an eye on yours as all ovens vary. I like to brush the glaze on with a pastry brush. Use a thin layer to see lots of the cookie peeking through or a thicker layer for a more opaque look.

Brownie Cookies

3 cups (384g) all purpose flour

1/2 cup (50g) dutch process cocoa powder

1/2 cup (50g) black cocoa powder (or dutch process)

1 teaspoon kosher salt

1/2 teaspoon baking powder

1/4 teaspoon cinnamon (optional)

1 cup (225g) unsalted butter, softened

1 1/2 cups (330g) light brown sugar

2 large eggs

1 teaspoon vanilla extract


Glaze

1 cup confectioners sugar

3 tablespoons cream

seeds from 1/2 vanilla bean or 1/2 teaspoon vanilla paste

1 teaspoon peppermint extract

pinch salt

Whisk the flour, cocoas, baking powder, and salt together in a bowl.

In the bowl of a stand mixer, combine the butter and sugar. Cream until light and fluffy then add the eggs one at a time. Mix until well combined then add the vanilla.

Add the dry ingredients all at once and mix until combined. Make sure to scrape the bottom and sides of the bowl to ensure the dough is evenly mixed.

Turn the dough out onto a piece of plastic wrap and wrap tightly. Refrigerate the dough for at least one hour and up to 2 days.

When you are ready to bake, arrange two racks as close to the center of the oven as possible and heat the oven to 350ºF. Line two baking sheets with parchment paper.

Work with half of the dough at a time and roll out the dough so it’s about 1/4-inch thick. Dip the cookie stamps in a bowl of cocoa powder or flour, shake off any excess and then press them firmly into the dough, one at a time, to create a deep imprint. Use a round cutter to cut the cookies.

Transfer the cookies to the lined baking sheets about 1-inch apart. Re-roll the dough scraps and continue to stamp and cut until all the dough is used up. Bake the cookies until they are just firm to the touch and puffed, 7-10 minutes. Rotate the baking sheets from top to bottom and front to back halfway through baking.

Prepare the glaze while the cookies are baking as it is best brushed on while they are still warm. Whisk all of the ingredients together in a small bowl. It should be the texture of Elmer’s Glue. If it seems a little thin, add a tablespoon or two of confectioners sugar. If its thin, add a little more cream.

Remove the cookies from the oven, let them rest for 5 mins, then brush or dab the glaze all over with a pastry brush. Transfer to a wire rack to cool completely. Cookies will keep for a few days in an airtight container at room temperature.


I used hand carved cookie stamps for these cookies. Zozo Baking sells similar ones.

You can also find cookie stamps in most kitchenware shops or online.

Stamped Brownie Cookies | apt 2b baking co 181212_StampedBrownieCookiesZI4A8380.jpg

Cooking Workshop and Retreat in Andros, Greece – Summer 2019

I’m so excited to announce that I will returning to Greece to be the guest chef for a Cooking Workshop and Retreat with Allegra Pomilio at Mèlisses in Andros, Greece August 30-Sept…

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I’m so excited to announce that I will returning to Greece to be the guest chef for a Cooking Workshop and Retreat with Allegra Pomilio at Mèlisses in Andros, Greece August 30-September 4, 2019. We will cook communal meals, relax by the pool, and discover some of Andros' most beautiful beaches.

There are a few different styles of rooms available at a few different price points and registration is open now! Click through to learn more about this beautiful place, our workshop, and to reserve your spot. Allegra can answer all of your questions about the house. See you in Greece!

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photos of Mèlisses and Andros by Renee Kemps

My Home Office Tour

I love working with food, but one of my other passions is home decor, so I hope you’ll humour me with this post! I’ve caught the decor bug in recent years, and I just love every stage of putting a room together. The only problem is that I don’t have much time for home decor […]

I love working with food, but one of my other passions is home decor, so I hope you’ll humour me with this post! I’ve caught the decor bug in recent years, and I just love every stage of putting a room together. The only problem is that I don’t have much time for home decor projects (I’ve completed 2 nurseries and an office in 5 years…lol), so I’ve been chipping away at this office at a snail’s pace. But I’m quite happy with how it’s come together. My goal was to create a serene and elegant home office with a lil’ bit of drama!

When we first moved into this house, we painted the office grey. We were going through a huge grey phase, but over time it started to wear on me, and I found the office was less than inspiring. I started to feel blah whenever I was in there (I also regret painting the basement grey…ugh!). One of my blog readers actually warned me about picking grey for an office, but I didn’t listen…you guys are always right! After going back and forth over what colour(s) I wanted to paint my office (I tested everything from spa green to super soft blush pink and, yes, even yellow!), I finally settled on a navy–charcoal blend and blush pink.

When I pictured my white office furniture popping off a dark, dramatic wall, I was sold. I didn’t want the whole room to be dark, so I kept the rest of the walls white for an airy feel. I’ve gone back and forth over whether I should do a bit of wallpaper on one wall (maybe the front wall where the windows are?), but I’ll most likely just leave it alone!  

The only thing missing is the light fixture above my desk. The electrical needs to be put in and I need to pick out the light…any ideas?? Should I go with a chandelier…or a semi-flush or…?

First, I’ll kick things off with my TWO bosses…they are fairly new to their “directing” roles, but it’s like they’ve been doing it their whole lives…. ;)

 

And here’s how it looks during the month of December! Lately I’ve loved getting up extra early for some “me time” in the morning—I turn the Christmas lights on, sit at my desk with my coffee, and do some writing, reading, planning, etc.

By the way, just in case you missed my big holiday newsletter, you can find a round-up of my favourite festive vegan recipes here! If I don’t chat with you again before signing off for Christmas, I hope you have a fantastic holiday! Thank you for all of your amazing support, thoughtful comments, and for making and sharing so many of my recipes this year!

Office details:

Paint colour (dark wall) – Blue Note (Benjamin Moore)

Paint colour (white) – Distant Gray (Benjamin Moore)

French doors – Wrought Iron (Benjamin Moore)

Desk and two filing cabinets – Crate and Barrel

Blush rug – Pier 1 Imports

White shelf – Wayfair (discontinued)

Elsie desk chair – World Market

Floral storage boxes on shelf – HomeSense (Guess what’s inside? Toys!)

Two white faux leather chairs – Wayfair

Rose quartz slab (on desk) – Anthropologie

Basket – Zara Home

Grey mug – Crate and Barrel

Blush pillows – HomeSense

Dark floral pillow – The Bay

Large floral framed print – Minted

Prop shelf with dishes – Wayfair

Mirror – Zara Home

Mountain print – SisiandSeb on Etsy

Profile art – SaltandPrinter on Etsy

Desert scene art – SisiAndSeb on Etsy

Pink Blue Abstract Print – LittleValleyStudio on Etsy

Taurus print – SaltandPrinter on Etsy

Inhale Exhale print – ParadigmArt on Etsy

White vase on desk – HomeSense

Blush pouf/ottoman – Restoration Hardware

Pink vase – Anthropologie

Grey letter A – HomeSense

Pink “crystal” tealight holder – HomeSense  

Holiday Gift Guide 2018

Gabe and I are back with another gift guide. This year I’m happy to report that we are publishing this about four days before last years so hopefully that gives you a bit more time to make the purchases. The items are our list below are a few things that brought us joy throughout the… Read more »

Gabe and I are back with another gift guide. This year I’m happy to report that we are publishing this about four days before last years so hopefully that gives you a bit more time to make the purchases.

The items are our list below are a few things that brought us joy throughout the year or in some cases, they are the very things on our list. Many of them are products produced by friends who I adore and I think are doing amazing things and the entire world should know about it.

We’d love to hear your feedback on our list and I am always excited to know what other people are gifting.

cookbook, gift, holiday

Cookbooks
I’ll admit, this year I was a bit preoccupied with finishing my book and trying to share it with the world so I haven’t had as much time as I’d like diving into new books but here are a few I have, have spent some time in their pages and am eager to get cooking:

1. Now & Then

Julia Turshen’s latest book is filled with recipes that I crave daily. They are simple, creative and the recipes work!

2. The Noma Guide to Fermentation

Every winter I like to tackle a project. This year; fermentation. I want to understand how this little bubbles work without making me sick. If you have someone in your life who loves an in depth kitchen project this book is for them. It’s properly nerdy and full of beautiful and practical imagery.

3. The Flavor Bible

This one never leaves my kitchen. In fact as I’ve been doing a bit of recipe planning this morning I have this book sitting at my feet. I’ve talked about it often but it’s worth repeating.

4. The Campout Cookbook

Elevated camping food full of unique ideas for cooking food over the fire. Which we all know, is one of my favorite pastimes. This book makes the often overwhelming task of preparing food on the campsite feel very doable and fun. I adore the illustrations and handy charts.

5. Wine Food

One of my goals for 2018 was to learn more about wine. I’m not so sure how much I learned but I sure drank quite a bit of it – which really is essential in the learning process. This book is a great guide to so many varieties and then pairs the wine with some of the most delicious sounding food – FALFEL WAFFELS!!

6. Drifters Fish

Nelly and Michael are two of my favorite people and they just so happen to produce the best smoked salmon around. If you want to send a taste of the PNW this is what you need. They were also our guides for the Alaska episodes.

7. Schotts Cardigan

I treated myself to this sweater about a month ago and I’ve not taken it off. They say it’s a men sweater but I say it’s mine.

8. Suribachi (Japanese Mortar & Pestle)

I purchased one of these at Uwajimaya here in Seattle. It’s been on every Kitchen Unnecessary adventure with us as it’s both functional and beautiful and it is used almost daily in my kitchen at home.

9. Culinary Knife Roll

This particular knife bag is on my Christmas list this year. I bought myself an inexpensive bag earlier in the year and wondered why I waited so long. It’s perfect for traveling (but of course you need to check it in a suitcase) or for moving from one place to the next. I love having everything I need and all of my favorite tools in one place. It’s perfect for cooking outside as I want to take only the things I need and nothing more. Great for the kitchen enthusiasts and chefs in your life.

10. Artifact Uprising Calendar

These stunning calendars have been gifted a few times. We have so many pictures gathered throughout the year and this is such a stunning way of highlighting them.

11. Hugh Forte Print

I’ve been a long time fan of Hugh’s food photography but his water prints are so calming and beautiful. I want them all.

I LOVE to give subscriptions for the holidays – it’s literally the gift that keeps on giving. Here are a few favorites.

12. SK Cooking Club

For the person who loves a little help in the kitchen planning recipes, grocery lists, etc. Sara’s friendly voice pops into your inbox weekly to deliver healthy and delicious recipes to help with the never ending question – “What’s for dinner?” Her recipes are approachable yet exciting, heavy on vegetables with a bright freshness that I just adore.

13. YES PLZ Coffee (and zine!) subscription

Never run out of coffee again. That is a gift I can get behind.

14. Sounds Delicious

Kasey and Matt are kindred spirits in the kitchen and around the turntable. I gifted Gabe with a series of Sounds Delicious albums and it’s a delight every time they arrive in the mailbox. Matt has curated an incredible list of artists who cover an entire album. I love the design of the albums themselves and each one has been so fun to listen to.

15. Modern Huntsman

This magazine is incredibly inspiring visually and has also been such a powerful voice for me as I’ve delved deeper into the outdoor world this year and have spent a large part of my life wrestling with hunting. It’s a biannual journal with the heart to change the narrative around hunting. It’s perfect for outdoor photographers and people just generally interested in living an outdoor lifestyle.

From Gabe:

16. Biscoff cookies – let’s be honest, I’m married to someone who has her own line of cookies. And they’re flippin amazing. But there’s a time and place for almost every cookie, and perhaps my favorite cookie to eat alongside that now rare afternoon cup of coffee is a Biscoff. Ashley knows I love them and always brings me a snack-pack of them from her airline flights when she travels. That’s just one of the reasons why I love her. You can also find Ashley’s recipe for Biscoff style cookies in her new book, Let’s Stay In. 😉

17. Rhodia Legal Pad – If you’re anything like me, you love a good to-do list. And you’re more than a little persnickety about the paper and writing implements you use on a daily basis. I’ve been using Rhodia notepads for years and love how they take the ink. Whether you feeling felt tip, ballpoint, jell pen or old school pencil lead, this paper is great for everyday notes and lists to keep you better organized.

18. Books and Art by Invisible Creature – These brothers are super talented. I’ve been fortunate to work with them on some small photography projects and always enjoy seeing what they’re up too (think space themed posters commissioned by NASA as well as postage stamps for the United States Postal Service). So when I saw they illustrated a Golden Book about Pixar’s The Incredibles I picked one up right away. I’m also currently making space to put up my Invisible Creature Oxford Pennant which commemorates the Kingdome. Check out their books, posters, prints and pennants. All great gift ideas.

19. PG tips – I mentioned last year that due to health reasons, I’ve limited my coffee intake and been ever more reliant on tea to get me going most mornings. Ashley reached out to our good friend Kacie (who currently resides in England) on a daily drinker and Kacie recommended PG Tips. She even gave me a little insight into how to properly brew. I figure if it’s good enough for Queen and Country, it’s good enough for me.  A lovely way to start your day.

20. Rescue a Puppy – Win the coveted “Parents of the Year” award from your kids by giving them a puppy on Christmas. There are a number of pet adoption agencies out there, we’ve adopted two dogs from Saving Great Animals (who rescued our Lily from a kill shelter). Both our dogs (Lillian and Frederick) have brought immeasurable amounts of joy to our family.