What Food Was *Actually* Served at the First Thanksgiving

A few years ago, I made my inner history nerd unbelievably giddy and spent a few weeks digging in to one question: What was actually eaten at the first Thanksgiving? The results were surprising (no turkey?!), illuminating, and just plain curious. So le…

A few years ago, I made my inner history nerd unbelievably giddy and spent a few weeks digging in to one question: What was actually eaten at the first Thanksgiving? The results were surprising (no turkey?!), illuminating, and just plain curious. So leading up to November, I thought I'd give you something to chew on besides what's on your table. First, let's set the scene:

The modern Thanksgiving holiday is based off a festival shared by the pilgrims and the Wampanoag Native American tribe at Plymouth Colony, Massachusetts, in 1621. The feast purportedly celebrated the colonists’ first successful harvest in the New World. While modern Thanksgiving always lands on the fourth Thursday in November, the original went down sometime earlier in autumn, closer to harvest time.

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Our 26 Coziest Fall Pasta Recipes

The moment fall is declared, I immediately begin to crave pasta—and only pasta—for every meal. There’s something about the holy union of carbohydrates, creamy sauces, and earthy autumnal vegetables (hey squash, hello mushrooms, good to see you cauliflo…

The moment fall is declared, I immediately begin to crave pasta—and only pasta—for every meal. There's something about the holy union of carbohydrates, creamy sauces, and earthy autumnal vegetables (hey squash, hello mushrooms, good to see you cauliflower) interspersed with zingy cheese and sausage and subtle threads of nutmeg that make autumn the ideal season for pasta consumption.

Fall pasta dishes are just cozy, which I know is a much-overused term, but if the word cozy were ever to be manifested as a pasta, it would for sure be a cool-weather one, full of bubbly cheeses and vegetables and a few woody herbs. Possibly a brassica or two. No matter what they contain, fall pasta dishes must be warm, they must be hearty, and, above all, they must be deeply satisfying.

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How to Make Compote With Any Fruit You Have

Here at Food52, we love recipes—but do we always use them? Of course not. Because once you realize you don’t always need a recipe, you’ll make your favorite dishes a lot more often.
Today: Transform your season’s harvest into a simple, versa…

Here at Food52, we love recipes—but do we always use them? Of course not. Because once you realize you don't always need a recipe, you'll make your favorite dishes a lot more often.

Today: Transform your season's harvest into a simple, versatile compote, without fancy canning equipment—and without a recipe.

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A Highly Useful Guide to Storing Cheese

When it comes to cheese, sometimes our eyes are bigger than our stomachs. Ideally, you shouldn’t buy more cheese than you can consume in a few days. However, few of us have a strong enough will to resist the jewel-like beauties of the cheese aisle, des…

When it comes to cheese, sometimes our eyes are bigger than our stomachs. Ideally, you shouldn't buy more cheese than you can consume in a few days. However, few of us have a strong enough will to resist the jewel-like beauties of the cheese aisle, despite their often hefty price tag. One thing's for sure: If you're dropping a bundle on a bunch of cheeses, you better make sure to keep them as fresh as possible for as long as possible. 

The best method for storing cheese is exceptionally simple, but you'll want to keep a few tips in mind, depending on what type of cheese you're storing—from a pungent blue to a creamy Camembert. 

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Why I’m Swapping Chia for Basil Seeds (at Least Sometimes)

I remember the first time I ever saw basil seeds. It was in the drink aisle of a gigantic Asian grocery store. I did a double-take; basil seeds? In a drink? Obviously, I had to try one.

The beverage was citrusy and filled with floating, gelatinous see…

I remember the first time I ever saw basil seeds. It was in the drink aisle of a gigantic Asian grocery store. I did a double-take; basil seeds? In a drink? Obviously, I had to try one.

The beverage was citrusy and filled with floating, gelatinous seeds with the texture of tapioca. It was unfamiliar to me, and at first, I thought the texture was a little slimy—but I actually enjoyed it. The seeds gave the drink a bit of chewy substance, and imparted a light, herbaceous flavor to the lemony drink.

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Let Mascarpone Luxe Up Mushroom Pasta & So Much More

Mascarpone is essentially an Italian version of cream cheese, though with a slightly higher fat content; mascarpone must have 40% fat while cream cheese only needs to have 33% fat. Cream cheese is also tangier than mascarpone, which tends towards the r…

Mascarpone is essentially an Italian version of cream cheese, though with a slightly higher fat content; mascarpone must have 40% fat while cream cheese only needs to have 33% fat. Cream cheese is also tangier than mascarpone, which tends towards the richer side of things. In fact, mascarpone most closely resembles French crème fraîche. Both are soured by lactic culture, but mascarpone is a little sweeter and milder.

All this to say, mascarpone is a lot more versatile than we give it credit for. It works quite well in both sweet and savory dishes. It's also surprisingly easy to make, so you don't even need to run out to a specialty grocery store to track some down.

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How to Make Really Good Ginger Beer From Scratch

Homemade ginger beer can be a thing of wonder. Whether you’re a Moscow Mule fan or just enjoy sipping it in a tall glass with ice, making ginger beer at home might mean the end of your store-bought ginger beer days. The fermentation process is eas…

Homemade ginger beer can be a thing of wonder. Whether you're a Moscow Mule fan or just enjoy sipping it in a tall glass with ice, making ginger beer at home might mean the end of your store-bought ginger beer days. The fermentation process is easier than you might think: You'll just need brewer's yeast and more than 48 hours (it takes up to a week!). But don't worry; this ginger beer recipe below doesn't ask much of you. Just get it started and you'll be on your way to the best ginger beer you've ever had.

There are two types of people in this world: people who like their ginger beer sweet, subtle, and unassuming, and people who like their ginger beer to kick them hard in the back of the throat. (I guess there are also people out there who don't like ginger beer, but for now I'm going to pretend they don't exist.)

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The 12 Best Restaurants in Charleston to Add to Your Eating Itinerary

Before visiting any new city, town, or hamlet, I have to research it online to find the best possible places to eat and drink. My attitude is that if I’m only going to have a few meals in a place, they better be the absolute best meals around…

Before visiting any new city, town, or hamlet, I have to research it online to find the best possible places to eat and drink. My attitude is that if I'm only going to have a few meals in a place, they better be the absolute best meals around. It is an obsession that often annoys those traveling with me, but once we're presented with a plate of [insert local specialty here], the complaints magically stop.

Therefore, I want to present you with the cream of the crop. Fortunately (and unfortunately), if you're looking for an incredible meal or a picturesque stroll, Charleston has almost too many choices. Not only is it enchantingly beautiful (Travel + Leisure named it the most romantic city in America), but it's also one of the most vibrant, creative, and welcoming places I've ever experienced.

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The Fuss-Free Way to Make Crêpes at Home

When I received a crêpe pan and a tin of crêpe mix for my tenth birthday, my family swapped Saturday morning pancakes for a tradition of a lopsided pile of crêpes.

But over time, I realized that neither the specialized pan nor the mix were necessary—d…

When I received a crêpe pan and a tin of crêpe mix for my tenth birthday, my family swapped Saturday morning pancakes for a tradition of a lopsided pile of crêpes.

But over time, I realized that neither the specialized pan nor the mix were necessary—despite crêpes being one of the most intimidating foods to make at home, matched only by soufflés and emulsion sauces.

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Stollen: The Ultimate German Christmas Bread

It’s December, which means the holidays are nigh! Today, we’re celebrating with stollen—a traditional German Christmas bread, also known as Christstollen and Weihnachtsstollen (fun fact: Weihnachten means “Christmas” in German). Studded with nuts and d…

It's December, which means the holidays are nigh! Today, we're celebrating with stollen—a traditional German Christmas bread, also known as Christstollen and Weihnachtsstollen (fun fact: Weihnachten means "Christmas" in German). Studded with nuts and dried fruits then dusted with a generous coating of icing sugar, German stollen is a delicious way to celebrate these cold-weather months, especially when guests are coming in and out of your home. Here's how to make it.


Christmas is a time of elaborate fruit-and-booze-laden breads, puddings, and cakes. It is the time of airy panettone and fruitcake and brandy-soaked puddings lit on fire. It is also the time of stollen, a traditional German Christmas treat of yeasted bread stuffed to the gills with brandy-soaked fruit and marzipan, then coated with a shell of powdered sugar.

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