4 Swap-Worthy Cookies, Courtesy of Our Favorite Bakers

ICYMI: Last month, we launched cook-along podcast Play Me a Recipe, where hosts take you through their most treasured, oft-made, and iconic recipes. On the show, you’ll hear (and hopefully join in) as they whisk, stir, slice, dice, and bake their way t…

ICYMI: Last month, we launched cook-along podcast Play Me a Recipe, where hosts take you through their most treasured, oft-made, and iconic recipes. On the show, you’ll hear (and hopefully join in) as they whisk, stir, slice, dice, and bake their way through a recipe—offering insider tips, tricks, and backstory along the way.

Our new podcast!

We heard from The Splendid Table host, cookbook editor, and food writer Francis Lam on the Chinese American Thanksgiving Meatballs inspired by his childhood, teenage angst, and—of all things—Pizza Hut.

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Bourbon-Pecan Sticky Buns for Superlative Sunday Mornings

“I wrote this book to bury y’all in cornbread and biscuits,” cookbook author Kelly Fields writes in the introduction to her recently released cookbook, Good Book of Southern Baking—“the best dang ones you’ve ever had.”
The path to dessert greatness wa…

“I wrote this book to bury y’all in cornbread and biscuits,” cookbook author Kelly Fields writes in the introduction to her recently released cookbook, Good Book of Southern Baking—“the best dang ones you’ve ever had.”

The path to dessert greatness was neither smooth nor easy for Fields. In the wake of Hurricane Katrina, in 2005, Fields lost every notebook and recipe she had saved throughout her career. Notes that she had painstakingly taken from culinary school and her numerous stints in pastry kitchens around the world.

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Listen Up! We Have a Delicious New Podcast.

Back in March, we found ourselves cooking—and uncovering more purpose, satisfaction, and necessary escape in said cooking—way more than we ever had before, and we were wondering how we could connect to you all out there who might be experiencing the sa…

Back in March, we found ourselves cooking—and uncovering more purpose, satisfaction, and necessary escape in said cooking—way more than we ever had before, and we were wondering how we could connect to you all out there who might be experiencing the same thing.

We revisited beloved recipes: a biscotti favorite going back decades. An omelet sandwich from childhood. A fail-proof pan of crispy-yet-fluffy potatoes. Each time, we recorded ourselves as we talked through what we were seeing, smelling, tasting, remembering, and thinking along the way.

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A Sticky, Peanutty Tempeh to Win Weeknight Dinner

“The first time I watched the sky bleed tones of orange and red as the sun set over the sea in my father’s home town of Kupang, Timor,” Coconut & Sambal author Lara Lee writes, “it struck me as a moment of coming home—but to a place I had never bee…

“The first time I watched the sky bleed tones of orange and red as the sun set over the sea in my father’s home town of Kupang, Timor,” Coconut & Sambal author Lara Lee writes, “it struck me as a moment of coming home—but to a place I had never been before.”

Growing up in Sydney with an Australian mother and a Chinese-Indonesian father and grandmother instilled in Lee a sense of longing for home—wherever, whatever that may be—at a very young age. As an adult, she began cooking professionally, and that back-of-mind longing quickly evolved into a front-of-mind mission:

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How Carla Hall Bakes (& Eats) A Perfect Biscuit

The Genius Recipe Tapes is a weekly show from Food52’s new podcast network, featuring all the uncut gems from the weekly Genius Recipes column and video series. This week, Kristen spoke with chef, cookbook author, and TV personality Carla Hall. This tr…

The Genius Recipe Tapes is a weekly show from Food52's new podcast network, featuring all the uncut gems from the weekly Genius Recipes column and video series. This week, Kristen spoke with chef, cookbook author, and TV personality Carla Hall. This transcript has been edited and condensed for clarity.


As Kristen announced a few weeks ago, over the past few months, we've been hard at work on a fun, new project: The Genius Recipe Tapes—aka more genius, and now for your ears.

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Pull-Apart Monkey Bread That’s Toasty, Oaty, Wonderful

We’ve partnered with Planet Oat to bring you our latest recipe contest: your creamiest, dreamiest dessert that holds the cream (not the dreams) and brings on the Oatmilk. Ready your mixing bowls and preheat those ovens, because today we’re announcing w…

We’ve partnered with Planet Oat to bring you our latest recipe contest: your creamiest, dreamiest dessert that holds the cream (not the dreams) and brings on the Oatmilk. Ready your mixing bowls and preheat those ovens, because today we're announcing which recipe took home the number-one spot—and it's sure to be your next weekend baking project.


Earlier this summer, we put out a call for your best dessert recipes that not only make use of oat milk, but are made that much better for it. In came your recipes for silky panna cottas, vibrant smoothie bowls, crumbly cakes, and icy and creamy granitas. Two weeks ago, our team of recipe testers, food stylists, and photographers put the top five to the test.

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A Beginner’s Guide to Shochu

“The first written record of shochu was actually graffiti on a temple,” Rule of Thirds partner George Padilla told me. “In the 1400s, some builders working on a temple had scrawled, in the wood, a snide comment about the high priest being stingy with h…

“The first written record of shochu was actually graffiti on a temple,” Rule of Thirds partner George Padilla told me. “In the 1400s, some builders working on a temple had scrawled, in the wood, a snide comment about the high priest being stingy with his shochu. Fittingly, this is the first record of what is, still today, considered a blue-collar beverage in Japan.”

Japan’s oldest, most traditional alcoholic beverage, shochu is a clear, distilled spirit made from fermented, well, almost anything. “I’ve actually calculated this once,” Kyushu-based osteopathic researcher by day, Kanpai blogger by night Stephen Lyman said to me. “For all the different decisions made during the process, there are literally millions of styles of shochu you can make. The scope is enormous.”

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The Parisian Cookbook We’re Escaping Into

It’s an odd time to be thinking about travel, let alone anything outside the four walls of our homes.

While we may not be able to travel, I’ve been finding solace in distraction: in words and images from distant places. Like that of the bartender at L…

It’s an odd time to be thinking about travel, let alone anything outside the four walls of our homes.

While we may not be able to travel, I've been finding solace in distraction: in words and images from distant places. Like that of the bartender at Le Mary Celeste stashing wine for La Buvette chef-owner Camille Fourmont; or Fourmont herself, tinkering with tubs of panna cotta, as a student in her tiny Parisian kitchen; or fellow chef and friend Lee Desrosier poking a cabbage in a fire years ago, and what he might be planning for dinner tonight.

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How to Meal-Prep Martinis & Win at Life

“Ultimately this book is for everyone,” cocktail expert and author John deBary writes in the introduction to his recently released Drink What You Want. “But if you’ve never made a drink in your entire life and you don’t know the difference between an o…

“Ultimately this book is for everyone,” cocktail expert and author John deBary writes in the introduction to his recently released Drink What You Want. “But if you’ve never made a drink in your entire life and you don’t know the difference between an old-fashioned and a gin and tonic, you are my target demographic.”

Organized by mood, feeling, or situation, the recipes found in Drink What You Want are fun (!) to read and deeply informative. But just because deBary is targeting first-time cocktail-shakers doesn’t mean the book is overly simplistic. (Case in point: a large-format, "meal-prepper" martini recipe calls for one bottle of gin, one bottle of vermouth, 375 milliliters of water, and a quarter ounce of bitters—all poured into a mixing bowl and stashed in the freezer. Or, a whisky sour shaken with preserves—a one-ingredient swap that provides consistent flavor and sweetness. Think smarter, not harder.)

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