A Sticky, Peanutty Tempeh to Win Weeknight Dinner

“The first time I watched the sky bleed tones of orange and red as the sun set over the sea in my father’s home town of Kupang, Timor,” Coconut & Sambal author Lara Lee writes, “it struck me as a moment of coming home—but to a place I had never bee…

“The first time I watched the sky bleed tones of orange and red as the sun set over the sea in my father’s home town of Kupang, Timor,” Coconut & Sambal author Lara Lee writes, “it struck me as a moment of coming home—but to a place I had never been before.”

Growing up in Sydney with an Australian mother and a Chinese-Indonesian father and grandmother instilled in Lee a sense of longing for home—wherever, whatever that may be—at a very young age. As an adult, she began cooking professionally, and that back-of-mind longing quickly evolved into a front-of-mind mission:

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How Carla Hall Bakes (& Eats) A Perfect Biscuit

The Genius Recipe Tapes is a weekly show from Food52’s new podcast network, featuring all the uncut gems from the weekly Genius Recipes column and video series. This week, Kristen spoke with chef, cookbook author, and TV personality Carla Hall. This tr…

The Genius Recipe Tapes is a weekly show from Food52's new podcast network, featuring all the uncut gems from the weekly Genius Recipes column and video series. This week, Kristen spoke with chef, cookbook author, and TV personality Carla Hall. This transcript has been edited and condensed for clarity.


As Kristen announced a few weeks ago, over the past few months, we've been hard at work on a fun, new project: The Genius Recipe Tapes—aka more genius, and now for your ears.

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Pull-Apart Monkey Bread That’s Toasty, Oaty, Wonderful

We’ve partnered with Planet Oat to bring you our latest recipe contest: your creamiest, dreamiest dessert that holds the cream (not the dreams) and brings on the Oatmilk. Ready your mixing bowls and preheat those ovens, because today we’re announcing w…

We’ve partnered with Planet Oat to bring you our latest recipe contest: your creamiest, dreamiest dessert that holds the cream (not the dreams) and brings on the Oatmilk. Ready your mixing bowls and preheat those ovens, because today we're announcing which recipe took home the number-one spot—and it's sure to be your next weekend baking project.


Earlier this summer, we put out a call for your best dessert recipes that not only make use of oat milk, but are made that much better for it. In came your recipes for silky panna cottas, vibrant smoothie bowls, crumbly cakes, and icy and creamy granitas. Two weeks ago, our team of recipe testers, food stylists, and photographers put the top five to the test.

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A Beginner’s Guide to Shochu

“The first written record of shochu was actually graffiti on a temple,” Rule of Thirds partner George Padilla told me. “In the 1400s, some builders working on a temple had scrawled, in the wood, a snide comment about the high priest being stingy with h…

“The first written record of shochu was actually graffiti on a temple,” Rule of Thirds partner George Padilla told me. “In the 1400s, some builders working on a temple had scrawled, in the wood, a snide comment about the high priest being stingy with his shochu. Fittingly, this is the first record of what is, still today, considered a blue-collar beverage in Japan.”

Japan’s oldest, most traditional alcoholic beverage, shochu is a clear, distilled spirit made from fermented, well, almost anything. “I’ve actually calculated this once,” Kyushu-based osteopathic researcher by day, Kanpai blogger by night Stephen Lyman said to me. “For all the different decisions made during the process, there are literally millions of styles of shochu you can make. The scope is enormous.”

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The Parisian Cookbook We’re Escaping Into

It’s an odd time to be thinking about travel, let alone anything outside the four walls of our homes.

While we may not be able to travel, I’ve been finding solace in distraction: in words and images from distant places. Like that of the bartender at L…

It’s an odd time to be thinking about travel, let alone anything outside the four walls of our homes.

While we may not be able to travel, I've been finding solace in distraction: in words and images from distant places. Like that of the bartender at Le Mary Celeste stashing wine for La Buvette chef-owner Camille Fourmont; or Fourmont herself, tinkering with tubs of panna cotta, as a student in her tiny Parisian kitchen; or fellow chef and friend Lee Desrosier poking a cabbage in a fire years ago, and what he might be planning for dinner tonight.

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How to Meal-Prep Martinis & Win at Life

“Ultimately this book is for everyone,” cocktail expert and author John deBary writes in the introduction to his recently released Drink What You Want. “But if you’ve never made a drink in your entire life and you don’t know the difference between an o…

“Ultimately this book is for everyone,” cocktail expert and author John deBary writes in the introduction to his recently released Drink What You Want. “But if you’ve never made a drink in your entire life and you don’t know the difference between an old-fashioned and a gin and tonic, you are my target demographic.”

Organized by mood, feeling, or situation, the recipes found in Drink What You Want are fun (!) to read and deeply informative. But just because deBary is targeting first-time cocktail-shakers doesn’t mean the book is overly simplistic. (Case in point: a large-format, "meal-prepper" martini recipe calls for one bottle of gin, one bottle of vermouth, 375 milliliters of water, and a quarter ounce of bitters—all poured into a mixing bowl and stashed in the freezer. Or, a whisky sour shaken with preserves—a one-ingredient swap that provides consistent flavor and sweetness. Think smarter, not harder.)

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How to Substitute Oat Milk in Sweet & Savory Recipes

We’ve teamed up with Planet Oat to share the many delicious ways you can enjoy their Oatmilk at home—from swapping it for dairy milk in fluffy cake batters to whisking it into a roux for creamy, cheesy pastas.

Because of my partner Trevor’s allergy …

We've teamed up with Planet Oat to share the many delicious ways you can enjoy their Oatmilk at home—from swapping it for dairy milk in fluffy cake batters to whisking it into a roux for creamy, cheesy pastas.


Because of my partner Trevor’s allergy to milk, and my attachment to what dairy brings to the table (puffed cakes, tender breads, silky sauces), we kind of ask a lot of our non-dairy substitutes. They must be creamy, full-bodied, reluctant to break, and relatively neutral-tasting so they can be splashed into anything—a sauce here, a braise there.

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Ghee-Smoked Chicken That Comes Together on Your Grill

“It started with—let me set the scene—me eating at a stateside Thai restaurant many years ago,” cookbook author Leela Punyaratabandhu writes in the introduction of her recently released Flavors of the Southeast Asian Grill.

“As I examined a skewer of …

“It started with—let me set the scene—me eating at a stateside Thai restaurant many years ago,” cookbook author Leela Punyaratabandhu writes in the introduction of her recently released Flavors of the Southeast Asian Grill.

“As I examined a skewer of chicken satay in my hand, I knew it had been cooked on a griddle hours in advance and reheated in a microwave, which prompted me to let out a small sigh over the wretched fate of how such an iconic grilled dish had become so dry, bland, and utterly devoid of smokiness.” This moment spurred Punyaratabandhu to develop not only a stellar satay recipe, but an entire book on Southeast Asian grilling.

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The 13 Best Cookbooks of 2020…So Far

Can anyone cook and eat whatever they want? What are the systems or powers that keep those freedoms from certain communities? What does it mean, as a conscious consumer and compassionate citizen, to question said systems and start afresh? If food is mo…

Can anyone cook and eat whatever they want? What are the systems or powers that keep those freedoms from certain communities? What does it mean, as a conscious consumer and compassionate citizen, to question said systems and start afresh? If food is more than fuel, in what ways is it political, transportative, intellectual, instrumental in heritage-making?

These cookbooks, all released this year, fittingly encapsulate the above questions, anxieties, and realizations that have been thrown into greater relief as of late. You’ll find: food to travel into and pine for, food that upsets cultural and biological boundaries, food capable of effecting social change—and when little else provides hope, just a simple, really perfect cookie recipe to ease the heart.

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