17 Crispy, Crunchy Napa Cabbage Recipes

Napa cabbage, also known as Chinese cabbage, is a part of the vast brassica family (along with cauliflower and Brussels sprouts). It’s different from standard green cabbage in that it has thick white ribs and crinkly, soft yellow or pale green leaves w…

Napa cabbage, also known as Chinese cabbage, is a part of the vast brassica family (along with cauliflower and Brussels sprouts). It's different from standard green cabbage in that it has thick white ribs and crinkly, soft yellow or pale green leaves with a feathery texture. But it's not just their looks that are different: As Russ Parsons notes in How to Pick a Peach: "Asian cabbages (Brassica rapa) actually come from a different species than European cabbages (Brassica oleracea). They are more closely related to bok choy, broccoli rabe, and, most oddly, turnips." 

You can find napa cabbage at most grocery stores with well-stocked produce sections, but if not, an Asian market will definitely carry it. Pick a heavy head with bright white ribs and crisp leaves that don't look limp or tired. To keep it fresh, wrap the cabbage in plastic wrap and store in the vegetable crisper. Feel free to peruse our 17 favorite napa cabbage recipes for inspiration on how to use it. Napa cabbage has a more delicate flavor and texture than Western cabbage, but substitutes easily, making it perfect for eating raw in salad and slaw (but still tough enough to stand up well to all kinds of cooking methods).

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How to Turn One Box of Groceries Into a Week’s Worth of Meals

Our friends at Imperfect Foods are reimagining grocery delivery. Their mission: to eliminate food waste and build a kinder, less wasteful world. So we’re sharing smart recipes and meal-planning tips that make the most of their grocery delivery offering…

Our friends at Imperfect Foods are reimagining grocery delivery. Their mission: to eliminate food waste and build a kinder, less wasteful world. So we're sharing smart recipes and meal-planning tips that make the most of their grocery delivery offerings—from the wide variety of produce to their budget-friendly pantry goods, like pasta, grains, and coffee (pro tip: Don't toss those used grounds!).


It’s become more and more common for all of us to ship everything straight to our doorsteps, especially during these times. There are definitely some silver linings to this shift: It’s convenient, safe, and has created a new daily highlight of checking for deliveries.

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Fresh Tarragon and Its 9 Best Uses

Every week we get Down & Dirty, in which we break down our favorite unique seasonal fruits, vegetables, and more.
Today: All this month we’ll be stocking up on fresh herbs to get our spring fix. Next up, tarragon. Read More >>

Every week we get Down & Dirty, in which we break down our favorite unique seasonal fruits, vegetables, and more.

Today: All this month we'll be stocking up on fresh herbs to get our spring fix. Next up, tarragon.

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So—What’s the Difference Between Pumpkin & Squash?

What’s in a name? When it comes to pumpkins, not much.
The word pumpkin probably makes you think of a large, round orange specimen ready for carving, but any hard-skinned squash could be called a pumpkin—there’s no botanical distinction tha…

What's in a name? When it comes to pumpkins, not much.

The word pumpkin probably makes you think of a large, round orange specimen ready for carving, but any hard-skinned squash could be called a pumpkin—there’s no botanical distinction that makes a pumpkin a pumpkin

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16 Stellar Ways to Use Radicchio

How often have you been at the farmers market and, unsure of what exactly that beautiful vegetable you’re looking at is called, mumbled “I’ll have one of those” under your breath while pointing at the object of your desire? Let’s agree to stop doing th…

How often have you been at the farmers market and, unsure of what exactly that beautiful vegetable you're looking at is called, mumbled "I'll have one of those" under your breath while pointing at the object of your desire? Let's agree to stop doing that. Head out to the market this weekend and confidently ask for the ruh-DEE-key-oh.

What Is Radicchio?

Radicchio is a type of chicory (as is puntarelle) and—along with artichokes, burdock, and Jerusalem artichokes—a member of the sunflower family. Endive, another member of the family, is very closely related to chicories (they’re all in the Cichorium genus), and they can be confusingly named depending on where you live in the world; what we think of as endive is known elsewhere as chicory.

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The Best Pumpkin Purée Isn’t Actually Pumpkin

We’ve partnered with Braun Household to share recipes, tips, and videos that highlight creative ways to boost the flavors of your favorite seasonal dishes, starting with a holiday staple: canned pumpkin! Psst: We teamed up with Braun Household back in …

We've partnered with Braun Household to share recipes, tips, and videos that highlight creative ways to boost the flavors of your favorite seasonal dishes, starting with a holiday staple: canned pumpkin! Psst: We teamed up with Braun Household back in 2018, but we've updated the article to include new ideas for using your homemade pumpkin purée.


Canned pumpkin is simply puréed, cooked pumpkin in a can, right?

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Is This the Best Way to Store Bananas?

Bananas are one type of produce we rarely have to think much about regarding proper storage. We just plop them down on the counter. Once they threaten to turn to mush, we either freeze them or make banana bread.
But, because we’ve been on a bit of a pr…

Bananas are one type of produce we rarely have to think much about regarding proper storage. We just plop them down on the counter. Once they threaten to turn to mush, we either freeze them or make banana bread.

But, because we've been on a bit of a produce-storage bender around here lately, we wondered if there was a way to keep bananas fresh longer.

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The Best Way to Store Celery Might Surprise You

Question: If you aren’t supposed to keep celery in the plastic bag it came in, how are you supposed to store it?
Answer: For the best results, keep celery heads whole, wrap them up tightly in aluminum foil, and then keep them in the refrigerator …

Question: If you aren’t supposed to keep celery in the plastic bag it came in, how are you supposed to store it?

Answer: For the best results, keep celery heads whole, wrap them up tightly in aluminum foil, and then keep them in the refrigerator crisper drawer as usual. When stored this way, celery stalks can maintain their freshness anywhere from two to four weeks.

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The Best Pie Weight Is Already in Your Pantry (Nope, Not Beans)

A couple years ago in our Baking Club, Leslie Rogers shared a delicious looking batch of lemon bars with a brown butter shortbread base. But what really caught our eye wasn’t the creamy lemon filling or the generous dusting of powdered sugar—it was her…

A couple years ago in our Baking Club, Leslie Rogers shared a delicious looking batch of lemon bars with a brown butter shortbread base. But what really caught our eye wasn't the creamy lemon filling or the generous dusting of powdered sugar—it was her off-hand comment that she used sugar as a pie weight for the toasty shortbread crust. No surprise that this ingenious idea comes from Stella Parks, whose book BraveTart was a smash hit in the Club.

How to Cook Fiddleheads, the Vegetable That Tastes of Spring

Every week we get Down & Dirty, in which we break down our favorite unique seasonal fruits, vegetables, and more.Today: we’re talking about fiddlehead ferns—learn what to look for, how to prep them, and get ideas for safely enjoying them in m…

Every week we get Down & Dirty, in which we break down our favorite unique seasonal fruits, vegetables, and more.Today: we're talking about fiddlehead ferns—learn what to look for, how to prep them, and get ideas for safely enjoying them in meals all week long.

Did your mom ever tell you to eat your vegetables so you’d grow big and strong? Bet she never promised invisibility. In Europe’s Middle Ages, people believed that carrying “fern seed” would make you disappear from sight. Shakespeare even referenced these magical powers in Henry IV! While we can't vouch for super powers, we can affirm that ferns are to thank for a fleeting spring treat. 

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