The No-Pot, No-Water Way to Make Hard-Boiled Eggs

Using hot water to cook eggs in their shells is just one way to produce hard-boiled eggs, and although it’s the conventional method, you actually don’t need any water at all—hot air works just as well. Don’t believe it? Turn on your oven and take it fo…

Using hot water to cook eggs in their shells is just one way to produce hard-boiled eggs, and although it's the conventional method, you actually don't need any water at all—hot air works just as well. Don't believe it? Turn on your oven and take it for a spin. Whether you're making Easter eggs, deviled eggs, egg salad, or anything else that calls for a big batch of perfectly cooked eggs in the shell, your oven is an excellent tool to get the job done. Ready to learn how to make hard-boiled eggs in the oven?

Temperature

Conventional wisdom says that 325°F is the sweet spot for baking eggs with shells on. At that temperature, baking times should proceed more or less as follows:

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How to Cook Lamb Chops to Crisp, Tender Perfection

Lamb chops are a scrumptious, savory treat, and a lovely way to bring variety to the typical rotation of chicken, beef, and pork. Quick-cooking and tender—depending on the cut, of course—lamb chops also possess a uniquely rich character that pairs well…

Lamb chops are a scrumptious, savory treat, and a lovely way to bring variety to the typical rotation of chicken, beef, and pork. Quick-cooking and tender—depending on the cut, of course—lamb chops also possess a uniquely rich character that pairs well with many different combinations of herbs and spices. Learn how to cook lamb chops to achieve the best possible result, and bring this impressive dish to the table more often.

Types of Lamb Chops

"Lamb chop" is a broad term that can refer to several different cuts of meat. To understand how to cook a lamb chop, it's important to know which cut you're cooking. The two most popular kinds are rib chops and loin chops, but you'll also see shoulder (or blade), sirloin, and leg chops in the butcher's case from time to time.

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How to Cook a Spiral Ham (& Enjoy It for Days)

Spiral sliced ham is, in fact, an American invention. Harry Hoenselaar, the founder of the HoneyBaked Ham Company, built the world’s first spiral slicing machine in 1924. The idea, he said, had come to him in a dream, and his prototype was assembled fr…

Spiral sliced ham is, in fact, an American invention. Harry Hoenselaar, the founder of the HoneyBaked Ham Company, built the world's first spiral slicing machine in 1924. The idea, he said, had come to him in a dream, and his prototype was assembled from "a tire jack, a pie tin, a washing machine motor, and a knife." If you're as enamored by the idea of this gorgeous meat helix as we are and wondering how to cook a spiral ham at home, you've come to the right place. Let's cut the fat, and get right down to the bone of how to treat your ham right, so you and your guests can properly feast on this succulent American classic.

What Is A Spiral Ham?

A spiral ham is, in a nutshell, a bone-in ham that's been sliced with a special spiral-slicing machine, which carves the meat into perfectly thin slices while allowing it to retain its show-stopping centerpiece shape for optimal presentation. All spiral sliced hams are pre-cooked, so there is actually no need to cook a spiral ham—it's ready to eat. Nonetheless, there are two additional steps to take in order to get the most enjoyment out of your ham: heating and glazing.

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How to Make Oatmeal Perfectly Every Time

Ready to learn how to make oatmeal once and for all? Before you get cooking, there’s a lot to know about this simple pantry staple. There’s a world of cooking variations to familiarize yourself with depending on how the raw grain was milled, which make…

Ready to learn how to make oatmeal once and for all? Before you get cooking, there's a lot to know about this simple pantry staple. There's a world of cooking variations to familiarize yourself with depending on how the raw grain was milled, which makes a difference in the preparation of your perfect bowl.

Like most grains, oats are best enjoyed in either a crunchy or a softened state. Dehydrated, toasted oats become granola. Oatmeal, on the other hand, is defined by the fullness of its hydration. In terms of cookery, oatmeal just might be the world's most forgiving dish. The recipe can be reduced to a simple equation. Oats + liquid + time = oatmeal. You can mess it up, but it's not easy, especially if you understand the ratio of oats to liquid. Oats can absorb a lot of water, so you need substantially less oats than water by volume: 1/2 cup of oats is a reasonable place to start for a single portion.

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How to Make Mayonnaise (Go Ahead, Give It a Whirl)

Mayonnaise is flavored fat that’s been processed in a special way to make it spreadable, even when it’s cold. The concept rests on the intuition that fat is good; flavored fat is better; and (in certain situations) creamy, spreadable flavored fat is be…

Mayonnaise is flavored fat that's been processed in a special way to make it spreadable, even when it's cold. The concept rests on the intuition that fat is good; flavored fat is better; and (in certain situations) creamy, spreadable flavored fat is best of all. Learn how to make mayonnaise in your home kitchen by learning all about it here, and you may never reach for the store-bought jar again.

What Is Mayonnaise?

The process of creating mayonnaise is a sort of culinary magic trick called emulsification. Emulsification is when two liquids that don't mix realize a kind of union with the help of a third ingredient (known as an emulsifier). In the case of mayonnaise, oil and water are held together by emulsifiers found in egg yolk.

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How to Cook Filet Mignon To Absolute Perfection

With high demand and only about eight cuts per cow, filet mignon often fetches the highest price in the butcher’s case. When you’re paying upwards of $20 per pound, cooking these precious tidbits can feel a little like a tightrope walk. Don’t be intimi…

With high demand and only about eight cuts per cow, filet mignon often fetches the highest price in the butcher's case. When you're paying upwards of $20 per pound, cooking these precious tidbits can feel a little like a tightrope walk. Don't be intimidated. By paying attention to a few important details, learning how to cook filet mignon like you've been doing it your whole life is actually quite easy.

What Is Filet Mignon?

Filet mignon is a choice steak, indeed. To form it, the butcher makes a cross-sectional cut from the small end of the tenderloin, a long muscle with one narrow, pointed end which runs along the lower part of the cow's spine. The flesh there doesn't do much work, and is, therefore, very, very tender.

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How to Make Pancakes Like A Flipping Pro

There’s nothing like a tall stack of toasty, hot, fluffy pancakes to bring many mouthfuls of satisfaction to your morning, noon, or even night. Fast, fun and endlessly customizable, pancakes are an essential element of every cook’s repertoire. From bat…

There's nothing like a tall stack of toasty, hot, fluffy pancakes to bring many mouthfuls of satisfaction to your morning, noon, or even night. Fast, fun and endlessly customizable, pancakes are an essential element of every cook's repertoire. From batter to belly, we break down the basics of this beloved breakfast classic so you can start flipping flapjacks with one hand tied behind your back.

What Is Batter?

All pancakes start out as batter, a mixture of flour, protein, fat, and liquid, plus a dash of bubble-creating chemicals in the form of baking powder and/or baking soda. Upon mixing, tons of tiny bubbles form throughout the batter, which, when poured onto a suitably hot surface, solidifies around these microscopic air pockets, resulting in the texture affectionately referred to as "fluffiness."

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