Lionfish Are Harming Our Oceans—Here’s One (Delicious) Way to Fight Them

Lionfish first appeared in the United States in 1985, off Florida’s Atlantic coast. Native to the coral reefs around the South Pacific and Indian Oceans, they were originally brought to the States as exotic pets. It’s believed that some of these pet ow…

Lionfish first appeared in the United States in 1985, off Florida’s Atlantic coast. Native to the coral reefs around the South Pacific and Indian Oceans, they were originally brought to the States as exotic pets. It’s believed that some of these pet owners eventually released their fish into local waterways—and unknowingly introduced an invasive species to the Gulf of Mexico.

Lionfish have no natural predators in the Gulf, can lay between 27,000 to 100,000 eggs every 2.5 days, and decimate the ecology of local fish by consuming about 20 smaller fish every 30 minutes. After their initial appearance in Florida, they quickly spread to other states, but Florida continues to suffer from some of the most extreme consequences. In our southernmost state, lionfish wreak havoc on the food supply of native fish like grouper and snapper, and their overconsumption of herbivorous fish results in damage to the reefs that line the Florida coast. It’s a dangerous combination that could result in lionfish causing grave damage to the delicate balance of life in and around Florida, and all the states bordering the Gulf of Mexico. That’s where marine biologist Alex Fogg comes in.

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How the Turkish Hospitality Industry Rallied to Aid Earthquake Victims

The first time I really understood the gravity of damage that comes with a life-altering earthquake was in 2010, when a 7.0-magnitude earthquake hit my paternal homeland of Haiti. Shortly after getting the news, my aunt, Marie France Conde, moved hell …

The first time I really understood the gravity of damage that comes with a life-altering earthquake was in 2010, when a 7.0-magnitude earthquake hit my paternal homeland of Haiti. Shortly after getting the news, my aunt, Marie France Conde, moved hell and high water to be one of the first doctors on the scene. It took her two days to arrive in Port-Au-Prince (no commercial flights were allowed into the country) and when she arrived, she said that the airport landing strip looked like “a warzone.” A pediatrician, my aunt jumped into action: building and running makeshift infirmaries for children, and trying to create some form of order in the face of insurmountable—and ongoing—need. “Even now, over 10 years later, there are still people who have not been able to rebuild their homes,” she said.

As I think about the recent earthquake that devastated Turkey and Syria, I see parallels between what happened in Haiti and what’s happening thousands of miles across the world. While the tragedy of that natural disaster was plastered all over our screens for days, the news cycle has focused less on the people and the amazing professionals who are aiding at the epicenter—like those in the hospitality industry who have jumped in to help their fellow citizens.

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