How Long Does That Open Bottle of Wine Last, Really?

Internet memes may tell you “there’s no such thing as leftover wine.”—a joke about drinking that misses the point that very often in daily life we might not finish an open bottle. If we do have leftovers, the conventional wisdom is that the clock is …

Internet memes may tell you “there’s no such thing as leftover wine.”—a joke about drinking that misses the point that very often in daily life we might not finish an open bottle. If we do have leftovers, the conventional wisdom is that the clock is ticking, since wine is best the same day it’s opened, or should be consumed by the next day at most. This is frustrating, though, if you don’t want to drink that opened wine the very next day or if you don’t have the chance, especially when the leftovers are of a great quality. And pouring “old” wine out feels like a waste. Many of us will ask under these circumstances, But how bad can it be?

The process that starts when you open a bottle of wine is called aeration, which leads to oxidation, which “increases color change and the loss of fruity characteristics,” according to professor Gavin Sacks, Professor of Enology and Viticulture in the Department of Food Science at Cornell University. It also “leads to the loss of sulphur dioxide, which preserves the wine,” he says, and dissipates aromas. Even if you put the cork back in, the process continues, since no closure is airtight and oxygen has already been introduced.

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How to Pick a Wine You’ll Actually Like

Many people enjoy drinking wine without knowing what they like about the taste. These may be wine drinkers but not self-proclaimed “wine people,” who may not have immersed themselves in the details of grape varietals and growing regions. They may—or ma…

Many people enjoy drinking wine without knowing what they like about the taste. These may be wine drinkers but not self-proclaimed “wine people,” who may not have immersed themselves in the details of grape varietals and growing regions. They may—or may not!—know what they like, but they don’t understand why one particular wine hits their sweet spot or know how to put what they liked into words.

The good news is that in the course of ordinary-life wine drinking, with just a few easy steps, you can gain insight into your palate. If you don’t know wine well, or are just embarking on a journey of discovery, understanding what you like will make the shelves in the liquor store less of a blank wall, help maximize your money, and for people who drink a glass with dinner, can really enhance the food. The following are eight easy steps to winey self-knowledge.

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How to Buy Wine in the Coronavirus Era

Keeping wine and spirits stores open during a public health crisis might seem like a punchline, but so far they have been deemed “essential.” People are stocking up to hunker down; they’re also turning to wine for its normalcy.

To share a glass is a m…

Keeping wine and spirits stores open during a public health crisis might seem like a punchline, but so far they have been deemed “essential.” People are stocking up to hunker down; they’re also turning to wine for its normalcy.

To share a glass is a most human endeavor, even when we’re sharing remotely. There’s some evidence, too, that people are buying more varied and adventurous bottles right now, perhaps learning more about wine—like baking bread, reading Tolstoy, and finally decluttering the home, things we’d always intended to do if we had more time.

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