50 Vegan Recipes

Great vegan recipes are like gold. Especially when they feature real whole foods, and lots of plants. This type of cooking supports your health and overall well-being in important ways. No meat? No dairy? No eggs? Don’t sweat it. There are many other ingredients to get excited about.

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Great vegan recipes are like gold. Especially when they feature whole foods, and lots of plants. This type of cooking supports your health and overall well-being in important ways. No meat? No dairy? No eggs? Don’t sweat it. There are many other ingredients to get excited about when you’re cooking and eating.

Mains

  1. Caramelized Tofu

    Caramelized strips of tofu served over sautéed shredded brussels sprouts. Caramelized Tofu

  2. Sunshine Pad Thai

    One simple trick makes this a turmeric noodle version of a classic. Vegan Pad Thai

  3. Last Minute Red Lasagna

    This is a true weeknight lasagna. No pre-cooking sauces, no pre-cooking noodles. Last Minute Red Lasagna

  4. Quick Vegan Enchiladas

    In the oven in less that ten minutes, and a healthful alternative to all the heavy cheese versions out there. With black beans, sweet potatoes, and a stealthy turmeric boost. Vegan Enchiladas

  5. Sushi Bowl

    a de-constructed sushi roll – brown rice, tofu, avocado, toasted nori and green onions served with a tangy, sweet citrus-soy dressing. Sushi Bowl

  6. Rice Porridge

    It’s a one pot, effortless, green, nutrient-packed twist on one of my favorite things to eat. Rice Porridge

  7. Chia Breakfast Bowl

    Chia Breakfast Bowl

  8. Vegetarian Paella

    Vegetarian Paella

  9. Steaming Vegetables

    Steaming Vegetables

  10. Green Falafel Bowl

    Green Falafel Bowl

  11. Ottolenghi Red Rice and Quinoa

  12. TLT Sandwich

  13. Pan-glazed Tempeh

  14. Weeknight Ponzu Pasta

  15. Soups

  16. Vegetable Noodle Soup

    Vegetable noodle soup is as simple, direct, and delicious as it gets. If you’re vegetarian or vegan looking for an alternative to chicken noodle soup, try this! Vegetable Noodle Soup

  17. Broccoli Cheddar Soup

    A simple, everyday broccoli soup made special with crusty, mustardy croutons and cheddar cheese. Broccoli Cheddar Soup

  18. Immunity Soup

    White pepper with jolts of ginger, and stabs of garlic – clear and strong topped with tofu, mushrooms, watermelon radish, and lots of green onions. Immunity Soup

  19. Simple Asparagus Soup

    A simple asparagus soup – fresh asparagus, new potatoes, a bit of green curry paste, and coconut milk are pureed to make this spring favorite. Simple Asparagus Soup

  20. Simple Cauliflower Soup

    This is the simplest cauliflower soup. Simple Cauliflower Soup

  21. Ribollita

    Ribollita is a thick Tuscan stew – dark greens, lots of beans, vegetables, olive oil, thickened with day-old bread. Ribollita

  22. Green Pea Soup

  23. Miso Tahini Soup

  24. Posole in Broth

  25. Leek Soup with Dill Oil

  26. Salads

  27. Taco Salad

    Tempeh taco salad – crushed tortilla chips bring the crunch, black beans and crumbled tempeh coated with taco seasoning brings the substance, and a strong, smoked paprika-apple cider dressing pulls everything together. Taco Salad<

  28. Rainbow Noodle Salad

    A radiant, color-flecked tangle of noodles, cabbage, shredded carrots, pickled sushi ginger, and an abundance of cilantro, basil, and scallions. Rainbow Noodle Salad

  29. Easy Tomato Pasta Salad

    Whole-grain pasta, baby kale, basil, and the best tomatoes you can get your hands on, with a generous drizzle of strong harissa dressing. Easy Tomato Pasta Salad

  30. Grilled Zucchini Bread Salad

  31. Smash-and-Toss Roasted Potato Salad

  32. Lazy Day Peanut Noodle Salad

  33. Summer Corn Salad

  34. Dips, Snacks and Appetizers

  35. Goth Hummus

    Goth Hummus

  36. Golden Beet Hummus

    Billowy and smooth, it’s a boosted hummus for everyday, all-day w/ golden beets, turmeric, and chickpeas. Golden Beet Hummus

  37. Turmeric Cashews

    Turmeric Cashews tossed with cayenne, nori, and sesame.

  38. Asparagus Tartine

    Avocado smeared across toasted day-old slabs of sesame bread, layered with arugula and garlicky caraway asparagus + toasted pepitas. Asparagus Tartine

  39. Roasted Tomato Salsa

    Deep, caramelized flavors of roasted tomatoes and onions alongside the smokiness of the chipotles equals the best salsa. Salsa

  40. Vegan Nachos

    Packed with beneficial spices, cashews, garlic, and grated sweet potatoes, and lasts up to a week refrigerated. Vegan Nachos

  41. Power Bars

    Savory power bars with toasted walnuts, crumbled kale chips, and oil-cured olives. Power Bars

  42. Muhammara

    Traditional red pepper spread originating from Syria made with a fascinating blend of red peppers, walnuts, olive oil, pomegranate molasses. Muhammara

  43. Mung Bean Hummus

    For creamy hummus, without the extra effort, I use mung beans instead. They work beautifully. Top the hummus with shallot oil, fresh chives Mung Bean Hummus

  44. Spicy Boosted Nut Butter

  45. Walnut Olive Miso Magic Sauce

  46. Cinnamon Vanilla Sunflower Butter

  47. Roasted Lemon Chutney

  48. Drinks and Desserts

  49. Rhubarb Rosewater Syrup

    Perfect on (or in) everything from yogurt, spritzers, waffles, or oatmeal. Rhubarb Rosewater Syrup

  50. Lime, Grapefruit and Ginger Juice

    Lime, Grapefruit and Ginger Juice

  51. Vitamin C Tea Blend

    Hibiscus and rose hips are both Vitamin C power houses. This is a much appreciated tea blend for when an immunity boost is needed. Vitamin C Tea Blend

  52. Homemade Strawberry Almond Milk

    Once you’ve tasted homemade almond milk it’s quite difficult to return to store-bought. Homemade Strawberry Almond Milk

  53. No Bake Energy Bites

    No-bake energy bites, my favorite alternative to energy bars. No Bake Energy Bites

  54. Two-ingredient Candied Citrus Lolipops

    Plump, juicy, citrus segments coated in thin, crunchy, sugar shells. Two-ingredient Candied Citrus Lolipops

My hope is you’ll find many ideas here to inspire more vegan meals in your home and life. The recipes listed here are vegan, or easily made vegan (with a minor tweak or two). I only list them here if I’ve actually mentioned how to make the recipe vegan in the recipe or in the head notes of the recipe. Here’s a favorite vegan recipe to start!

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Pumpkin and Rice Soup

Silky textured and vibrant, the pumpkin soup I made as soon after 40 hours of travel back from India. It has a herby rosemary butter drizzle and lemon ginger pulp, and completely hits the spot.

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The provisions were scarce when we got back from India the other night – my first winter squash of the year still on the counter, brown rice in the freezer, a bit of sad looking ginger on the windowsill, random nuts and seeds in the cupboard, herbs still going strong in the planter boxes out back, and a three week old knob of butter. That was pretty much it. But I felt exhausted after getting off the plane, and after forty hours of travel from door to door, I was determined cook at home. This simple soup was the first thing I made. It was silky textured, vibrant in color, and after a quick trip to the corner store in the morning for a bit of yogurt and a lemon – the lunchtime leftovers were even better. Particularly because of a finishing touch of a rosemary herby butter drizzle and lemon ginger pulp. I hope you find it as restorative as I did. Also! I wanted to tack some photos of one of my favorite experiences from India onto this post – the day Wayne and I had our photos taken on the street in Jaipur.

Pumpkin and Rice Soup Recipe

I’d read about this man, Tikam Chand. He has been taking pictures in the Old City of Jaipur using his grandfather’s camera for decades. And, upon arriving in Jaipur, we set out to find him. No luck, at first. But a couple of days passed, and finally, at a moment we weren’t looking, Wayne spotted a guy with an old camera on the sidewalk. We pulled over, hopped out, and it wasn’t ten seconds before we were in front of the camera. Sixty seconds and five frames had been snapped. Sit here, look here, you two together, and so forth. I was thinking it was very much like getting a dental x-ray. Much more fun, but still – all business. And it wasn’t Tikam with the camera, it was Surrender. I’m still not entirely clear on whether the two photographers share the camera, or if they’re related.

Pumpkin and Rice Soup RecipePumpkin and Rice Soup Recipe

So, you have your picture taken, and that’s when things start getting incredible. The processing is done right there on the street, and is finished in just a few minutes. A box in the back of the camera functions as the darkroom, negatives made from small sheets of hand-torn photo paper are slapped on a piece of wood, and shot again to make the positives. There’s a bucket for rinsing. Your completed pictures (and negatives if you splurge for them) are unceremoniously wrapped in a zig-zag folded sheet of the daily newspaper. It all goes down fast, and somewhat hilariously. For those of you who are interested in the specifics of how this works, I found this (Jonas also has some amazing Jaipur photos).

Pumpkin and Rice Soup Recipe

The head-to-toe shot of us up above might be my favorite shot ever of the two of us together.

Pumpkin and Rice Soup Recipe

An out of focus shot of the camera from the front. All eyes on Krishna. There’s no shutter, so to expose the frame, the red foil lens cap is moved to the side for a second or so. Part of what I loved about the whole experience was how unfussy, and non-technical it was. This guy had a good lens on a box set on a tripod that looked like a few sticks of driftwood bound together. And his photos are beautiful in a way you’ll never get with a new camera. Completely inspiring. 

Pumpkin and Rice Soup Recipe
Anyway! I have much more to share with you, in the meantime enjoy the soup. Trick it out with the good toppings, and I’m almost positive it’ll become a staple for you this fall/winter – or, at least, I hope so. xo -hPumpkin and Rice Soup Recipe

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Roasted Tomato & Sourdough Soup

If you have both tomatoes and sourdough on hand, consider this. A spicy, saffron-smacked take on pappa al pomodoro, the bread-thickened Tuscan classic. A spicy, saffron-smacked take on pappa al pomodoro, the bread-thickened Tuscan classic.

Continue reading Roasted Tomato & Sourdough Soup on 101 Cookbooks

There are two things we have in spades right now – ripe tomatoes and sourdough bread. Inevitably, this time of year the variations on tomato soups and sauces coming out of the kitchen are many. The other night, I made this. Walking into the kitchen, I imagined building on the idea behind pappa al pomodoro, the tomato-centric, bread-thickened Tuscan classic. We ended up sitting down to a spicy, saffron-smacked stew with a tomato and sourdough foundation dotted with chickpeas. It was a big hit, so I made it again the next day so I could shoot and share it here. If there’s a place where summer eating meets comfort food, this is it.
Roasted Tomato & Sourdough Soup Recipe

The tomatoes!

Let’s talk details. Your choice in tomatoes here is key. It’s the flavor base of this soup. Go for the most flavorful, ripe, in-season tomatoes you can get your hands on. Ugly or not-perfect is fine, they’re going to get roasted and blitzed anyway. I save my cherry tomatoes for other uses – salads, roasting, pastas, etc. and opt for medium-sized varietals like Early Girl or San Marzano instead.  
Roasted Tomato & Sourdough Soup Recipe

Roasting For Flavor

Here’s roughly what your tomatoes, onions, and garlic should look like after roasting (below). I put the onions and garlic on their own baking sheet in case they cook faster. It makes it easier for you to remove them early if needed. You can certainly do a version of this soup without roasting, but the depth of flavor you get from this extra step is worth it.
Roasted Tomato & Sourdough Soup Recipe

The Bread Component

Our “house” sourdough bread is ~60 % whole wheat / rye flour blend, plus a good amount of cooked quinoa. It’s quite hearty and wholesome, and it’s great here. I use heartier whole-grain sourdoughs in soups like this one, or bread-thickened ribollita all the time. I think people worry that they need to use a white loaf (like a ciabatta or “Italian” bread), but you can totally experiment. It might not be typical, but it can be tasty (and more nutritious).  
Roasted Tomato & Sourdough Soup Recipe

Variations

I was craving something invigoratingly spicy when I threw this together the other night. I was after a straight, direct shot of tomato & spice. That’s why you see a good dose of cayenne in the recipe. I added a bit of saffron because tomatoes and saffron are one of my favorite flavor combinations. That said, there are (of course) endless other directions you could explore! For example: 

  • A more classic flavor profile: dial back the spices, turn up the basil.
  • Add a dollop of harissa instead of cayenne.
  • Use yellow tomatoes + lots of black pepper & experiment with a turmeric-chive-garlic drizzle of some sort.
  • Use some of your corn by adding it with the chickpeas. And for the experimenting bread bakers out there – how about a sourdough with a percentage of cornmeal, whole corn, etc in the bread slot? I’d use something other than a quick bread style cornbread (not enough structure when it hits the soup). 

Roasted Tomato & Sourdough Soup Recipe

It’s wild how in my garden there will be a blast of tomatoes for a few weeks and then it’s over in a flash. If you’re looking for other ways to put a dent in your tomato supply right now – some ideas. Try to make the most of them while they’re here. Try a fresh version of this tomato sauce. Use them in a tomato tart. Make this favorite salsa. Or load them into a coleslaw. xx – h

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Ten Freezer-Friendly Pantry Soups

Pantry soups forever. A collection of favorite soups and stews that rely on pantry staples like beans, grains, rice, canned tomatoes, and the like – ingredients you might have in your cupboard.

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Hi everyone. Not surprisingly, I’m getting a lot of requests for pantry soup recipes right now. I made a couple myself this week (a red cabbage version of ribollita, and a simple farro & bean soup), and it’s the kind of cooking I love most. I hope you’ll find some inspiration in this collection of favorite soups and stews that rely on pantry staples like beans, grains, rice, canned tomatoes, and the like – ingredients you might have in your cupboard. Keep in mind, many of them are very adaptable, meaning that I encourage you to make substitutes if you don’t have an ingredient or two! I’ll give some easy swap suggestions in the list below. And if you aren’t sure if a substitution will work or not, please message me on Instagram – I’m more than happy to help you come up with a plan.

Chickpea & Rice Soup with Garlic Chile Oil

1. Chickpea & Rice Soup with Garlic Chile Oil – A chunky rice soup, studded with lots of chickpeas, flecked with kale, and drizzled with a vibrant garlic-chile oil. It has peanuts, and a dusting of turmeric. It freezes beautifully, and you can experiment with a range of toppings.

Ribollita

2. RibollitaThis classic Tuscan stew is such a great way to get everything you need to use in your kitchen into one delicious pot – day (or two)-old bread, carrots that are no logger snappy, leafy greens, etc. I had a cabbage that needed a purpose the other night – chopped it, and into the pot it went. Use beans from your pantry stash, canned tomatoes, and a medley of vegetables. It’s also a great way to eat the rainbow, and get a wide range of healthful ingredients into your bowl.

Green Lentil Soup with Curried Brown Butter

3. Green Lentil Soup with Curried Brown ButterGreen lentils (or split peas), topped with a curried brown butter drizzle. This version calls for cubes of pan-fried paneer on top, but you could skip that and just do a bit of grated cheese. Or! You can certainly explore a vegan version – infuse some olive oil or coconut oil with spices, and brown some tofu in place of paneer. A different beast, but also really good.

Curried Tomato Tortellini Soup

4. Curried Tomato Tortellini SoupA fortifying lentil and tomato-based stew, dotted with plump, tender dumplings, spiked with a range of spices, and boosted with plenty of spinach. It’s so delicious, and simple, week-night friendly, and great for leftovers. Also, no shame in using frozen spinach, here. It cuts the already minimal prep time here down to near nothing.

Spicy Taco Soup Recipe

5. Spicy Taco SoupYou can make this one in an Instant Pot, but you don’t have to. It’s pretty much just a dump & stir situation consisting of a hearty melding of beans, corn, taco spices, and quinoa. Frozen corn is fine. I bring the creaminess and crunch factor in via the toppings – toasted pepitas for the later, ripe avocado or guacamole, and a dollop of yogurt for the creamy.

Lively Up Yourself Lentil Soup

6. Lively Up Yourself Lentil SoupA simple yet satisfying lentil soup where the tang of tomatoes plays off the earthiness of lentils, with a fragrant bolt of saffron yogurt as the closer. It has been up on my site for years, and I’ve been meaning to reshoot the photos for nearly as long. A lot of you have cooked this, and have left some great adaptations in the comments – I’ve pulled a few favorites into the main post.

Vegetarian Split Pea Soup

7. Vegetarian Split Pea SoupA delicious, healthy, textured soup made from an impossibly short list of ingredients. Seriously, just five! Simply green split peas and onions cooked until tender, partially pureed, seasoned and flared out with toppings.

Coconut Red Lentil Soup

8. Coconut Red Lentil SoupBased on an Ayurvedic dal recipe in the Esalen Cookbook, I love this recipe so much. It’s worth trying even if you don’t have the exact spices. Just wing it a bit! No ghee or coconut oil, use olive oil. No ginger? Try some garlic instead.

Simple Farro & Bean Soup

9. Simple Farro & Bean SoupThe sort of hearty, timeless, comforting soup that helps in times like these. I made it earlier this week and felt a bit better because of it. There’s chopping to do, which keeps the hands busy and mind focused. The foundation ingredients are flexible and straight from the pantry – grains, canned tomatoes, beans. And if you have a lot of produce that needs to be used, a soup like this is perfect – eat some, freeze some. The ultimate pantry soup.

Richard Olney's Garlic Soup

10. Richard Olney’s Garlic SoupThe ultimate comfort soup. Creamy and full-bodied without the use of cream, it is made by simmering a dozen or so cloves of garlic in water with a few herbs, then thickening the broth with a mixture of egg and shredded cheese. It’s hard to beat a big ladleful poured over crusty, day-old walnut baguette with a finishing slick of olive oil.

And if none of these pantry soups seems to hit the spot for you, here’s an entire section of soup recipes. Or, here’s a round-up of blender soups. Or a collection of amazing vegetable broths. xx, -h

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Simple Farro & Bean Soup

The sort of hearty, timeless, comforting soup that helps in times like these. The foundation ingredients are flexible and straight from the pantry – grains, canned tomatoes, beans. There’s chopping to do, which keeps the hands busy and mind focused. And if you have a lot of produce that needs to be used, a soup like this is perfect – eat some, freeze some.

Continue reading Simple Farro & Bean Soup on 101 Cookbooks

I’m updating this soup from the archives (2010)  because it’s the sort of hearty, timeless, comforting soup that helps in times like these. I made it this afternoon and feel a bit better because of it. There’s chopping to do, which keeps the hands busy and mind focused. The foundation ingredients are flexible and straight from the pantry – grains, canned tomatoes, beans. And if you have a lot of produce that needs to be used, a soup like this is perfect – eat some, freeze some.
Simple Farro & Bean Soup

I want to keep my original post here because it reminds me of how I felt cooking it for them ten years ago. // (February 23, 2010) I spent the night at my mom and dad’s house last week. I’m sure I’ve mentioned this before, but they live an hour south of San Francisco in Los Gatos. It’s nice cooking in their kitchen this time of year because the view from the sink is quite beautiful. The hills surrounding their house are an electric shade of green and the old craggy-skinned oak trees are covered in moss and lichen. They say coyotes have been out recently, but when I was growing up it was mainly deer, skunk, and raccoon, (and the occasional rattle snake). I made a big pot of farro and bean stew for them – simple, hearty, and straightforward. They both went back for seconds, and I took that as a good sign.
Simple Farro & Bean Soup
The recipe below ended up being quite a departure from the recipe I photocopied, folded, and slipped into my overnight bag – regardless, I wanted to mention the book the inspiration came from – La Cucina: The Regional Cooking of Italy. I’ve been reading through it at night. It’s the culmination of the work of the Accademia Italiana della Cucina. It is an organization of thousands of members who would visit villages, towns, and farms all across Italy to document cooking techniques and ingredients – in order to preserve the culinary heritage of their country. The resulting volume is 930+ pages huge. The farro soup section has five or six recipes.
Simple Farro & Bean Soup

Over the years I’m made tweaks and variations to this soup, and topped it with any number of things. Here are a couple of favorites.

Harissa & feta: We ate the soup drizzled with harissa/olive oil and a good amount of feta cheese. Highly recommended for those of you sitting on harissa. Whisk together a ratio  about 1/3 harissa paste to 2/3 olive oil. Drizzle over the top of the soup.

Cilantro-garlic: Pictured here drizzled with a cilantro-garlic olive oil. Puree the leaves and stems of a bunch of cilantro with 2-3 cloves of garlic, a pinch of salt, and olive oil to cover.

Simple Farro & Bean Soup
A version with heirloom beans, Savoy cabbage, and kale.

Your Bean Strategy

You have a lot of latitude here. I’ve done versions of this soup with dried beans, and canned beans. I’ve used I used Sangre de Toro beans, Rosa de Castilla , cannellini beans, and (as you see pictured here) canned chickpeas. I used Sangre de Toro beans the first time around. The second time I used Rosa de Castilla. Both were good (the pot liquor from the Sangre de Toro was intense in a good way), but the Rosa de Castilla were great – they held their shape, then melted in your mouth. Red beans are traditionally used. Canned chickpeas work wonderfully too. They’re all delicious, use what you think you might like, or what you have on hand. And remember, if you use dried beans, great! Save the bean broth and use it in combination with the water called for in the recipe for a wonderful, fully-bodied broth.

Simple Farro & Bean Soup

A Creamy Soup with No Cream

One last variation you can explore if you like. If you mash a cup of your cooked beans before adding them to the soup it results in a “creamier” broth. I skipped that step in the recipe below, opted for a more clear broth (as you can see above), but keep the idea in your back pocket.

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Life Changing Green Rice Porridge (Instant Pot, Vegan)

I don’t use the term life changing lightly, but this rice porridge recipe fits the bill. It’s a one pot, effortless, green, nutrient-packed twist on one of my favorite things to eat.

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I don’t use the term life changing lightly, but this rice porridge recipe fits the bill. It’s a one pot, effortless, green, nutrient-packed twist on one of my favorite things to eat. Congee, also commonly referred to as rice porridge. This version incorporates a lot of chopped spinach. A lot. Enough spinach that your body will notice.

Life Changing Green Rice Porridge Recipe

The Cooking Method

I make this porridge in an Instant Pot. You can also make it in a thick-bottomed pot on the stovetop – no Instant Pot necessary. Although, that method requires more babysitting. Similar to this Instant Pot Congee with Brown Rice and Turmeric, you put your rice into the pot, add water or broth, walk away, and start daydreaming about toppings.

Life Changing Green Rice Porridge Recipe

Let’s Talk about Toppings

Here you see lime, crushed kale chips and toasted nori, toasted pepitas, hemp seeds, and jungle peanuts. The tofu is sliced thinly, drizzled with shoyu, and draped over the porridge. Sometimes I spike the whole situation with sriracha sauce, sometimes I don’t.

Life Changing Green Rice Porridge Recipe

Getting the Rice Porridge Just Right

I’ve settled on a ratio of brown rice to white rice that works really well. You’ll see that reflected in the recipe. It’s one part white jasmine rice to two parts brown jasmine rice. You can optionally pepper that rice blend with 1/4 cup of other quick cooking grains or pulses if you like – French lentils, adzuki beans, Job’s tears, etc. Or not, totally your call!

Life Changing Green Rice Porridge Recipe

I know I say this often, but feel free to use this recipe and ratio as a jumping off point. Next time I might add a bunch of chopped herbs, and use another favorite broth in place of water.

I hope you love this rice porridge! It’s nutrient-packed and green. Simple to make. Made with whole foods. Delicious anytime of day. One pan magic. And, the perfect hearty, satisfying canvas to load up with your favorite toppings.

Lastly, for anyone looking for more Instant Pot recipe inspiration, I’ve set up an Instant Pot recipe category – all my favorite successes are featured there. Or, if you you’re on the lookout for goof soups & stews, here’s all the soup recipes. And, for reference, this is the Instant Pot I used for this recipe: Instant Pot DUO Plus 6 Qt 9-in-1 Enjoy!

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20 Fantastic Noodle Soups to Cook this Winter

Everyone needs an arsenal of great noodle soup recipes for winter. Here are twenty fantastic options from ramens and pho, to soba bowls.

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A good brothy noodle soup is great anytime of year, but it’s particularly good in the middle of winter. And you have options! Between the broth, the type of noodles, and whatever else you put in the bowl, the possibilities are nearly endless. Below you’ll find a collection of A+ noodle soups to try. There are interpretations of classics like pho and ramen, alongside seasonal ideas, and unique seasoning approaches. Enjoy! – h

20 Fantastic Noodle Soups to Cook this Winter

1. Winter Green Miso Noodle Soup (101 Cookbooks) The noodle soup above is built on my green miso paste. Simply add water, whatever fresh noodles, and some winter greens, and you’re good. 

20 Fantastic Noodle Soups to Cook this Winter

2. Pumpkin Miso Broth with Soba (My New Roots) Perfect winter combination and colors. The combination of sesame seeds and sautéed shiitake mushrooms on top looks wonderful.

20 Fantastic Noodle Soups to Cook this Winter

3. One-Pot 5-Spice Chickpea Noodle Soup (Will Frolic for Food) A hearty soup made with rotini. It highlights an array of five spices along with a combination of balsamic, apple cider vinegar, and yogurt to create a rich stew-y soup.

20 Fantastic Noodle Soups to Cook this Winter

4. Shiitake and Spinach Miso Soup (A Beautiful Plate / Love and Lemons ) Originally from the beautiful Love and Lemons cookbook, this recipe will inspire you to source some perfect shiitake mushrooms. Two cups of spinach means you’ll get a healthy dose of greens.

20 Fantastic Noodle Soups to Cook this Winter

5. New Year Noodle Soup Recipe (101 Cookbooks) This is an all-time favorite traditional Persian noodle soup. It features thin egg noodles, borlotti beans, herbs, turmeric, cumin, and all sorts of other ingredient magic.

20 Fantastic Noodle Soups to Cook this Winter

6. Chickpea Noodle Soup with Parsley and Lemon (Occasionally Eggs) Chickpeas, carrots, cayenne and a squeeze of lemon make this a good candidate for cold season.

20 Fantastic Noodle Soups to Cook this Winter

7. Chickpea & Sweet Potato Noodle Soup (My New Roots) This is one of those recipes that makes taking out the spiralizer worth it.  

 

20 Fantastic Noodle Soups to Cook this Winter

8. Kimchi and Buckwheat Noodle Egg drop soup (Nyssa’s Kitchen) For kimchi fans. This one is for you. Kimchi + Egg drop soup – you know it is going to be good. 

20 Fantastic Noodle Soups to Cook this Winter

9. Really Great Vegan Ramen (101 Cookbooks) Here’s my take on a vegan ramen. Bonus – all the components are great on their own (if you have leftovers), and there are seasonal ideas, for year round ramen. 

20 Fantastic Noodle Soups to Cook this Winter

10. Vegetarian Pho (Happy Yolks / Green Kitchen Travels) An beautiful, inventive take on pho – bok choy, bean sprouts and basil with fennel.

20 Fantastic Noodle Soups to Cook this Winter

11. Bangkok Coconut Curry Noodle bowls (Pinch of Yum) Love the mix of colors in this one. Based on rice noodles and a mix of veggies, swap out the fish sauce for one of the veg versions out there and this is a hearty, straight-forward weekday meal.

20 Fantastic Noodle Soups to Cook this Winter

12. Vegetarian Pho Noodle Soup (Omnivore’s Cookbook) Here’s another pho, but a different technique is used to prep the ingredients. Deep smoky flavors are created by charring ginger and onions.

20 Fantastic Noodle Soups to Cook this Winter

13. Vegetarian Ramen with Garlic-Ginger Broth (The Roasted Root) All the greens, four or five different shades(!) layered on top of rice noodles.

20 Fantastic Noodle Soups to Cook this Winter

14. Vegetarian Ramen Bowl with Spicy Brussels Sprouts (Naturally Ella) A ramen bowl with a wild card – brussels sprouts roasted with sambal oelek.

20 Fantastic Noodle Soups to Cook this Winter

15. Vegan Ramen Spicy Noodles (Love is in My Tummy) Time to get your kombu on.20 Super Noodle Soups

16. Chinese Vegetarian Noodle Soup (中式素汤面) (Omnivore’s Cookbook) This veg noodle soup features tofu marinated in maple syrup, kale and an optional “detox vegetable broth.”

20 Fantastic Noodle Soups to Cook this Winter

17. Mushroom and Spicy Tofu Udon Soup (But First Plants) This is one you’ll want to try if you can find some good, fresh udon noodles. Sriracha and sesame seeds provide a flavor twist.

20 Fantastic Noodle Soups to Cook this Winter

18. Green Miso Soba Soup (Fork Knife Swoon) This miso + soba combination uses a healthy dose of onion, ginger and garlic to provide a good clearing of the sinuses.

20 Fantastic Noodle Soups to Cook this Winter

19. Ginger Miso Udon Noodles with Five-Spice Tofu (Healthy Nibbles and Bits ) Here’s another take on miso with ginger, but this time with udon. Ground coriander and a five-spice blend for the tofu offer unique flavors for a noodle soup.20 Fantastic Noodle Soups to Cook this Winter

20. Turmeric Miso Soup with Shiitakes, Turnips and Soba (Lindsey Love) Here’s a soba soup that uses fresh turmeric, yellow miso and the surprise: turnips.

20 Fantastic Noodle Soups to Cook this Winter

21. Vegetable Miso Soup with Soba Noodles (Marie Reginato) This is another miso soup recipe that creates a solid flavor base with kombu / kelp, so seek it out at the store (also easy to find online). Cabbage and sweet potato provide a winter veg base, but you could adapt this to different seasons.

And if for some reason noodles soups aren’t your thing, there are dozens of my favorite soup recipes all in one spot.

20 Fantastic Noodle Soups to Cook this Winter

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Curried Tomato Tortellini Soup

A crowd-pleasing lentil and tomato-based stew, dotted with plump, tender dumplings, spiked with a range of spices, and boosted with plenty of spinach.

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I installed the Dr. Greger’s Daily Dozen app on my phone last year, and it was a real eye opener for a few reasons. The app is actually just a simple checklist of ingredients to incorporate in your daily diet – ideally, every day. Beans, berries, spices, nuts, greens, etc. It’s actually not simple. The thing that struck me immediately is the way you need to make every meal (and snack) count if you want to check all the boxes. I found that I needed to have more of a plan than my usual “free-style” approach, as well as an evolved arsenal of go-to recipes. So! The first thing I started doing was incorporating meals that were delicious, satisfying, one-bowl “box-checkers”, like this soup.

Curried Tomato Tortellini Soup

It’s a fortifying lentil and tomato-based stew, dotted with plump, tender dumplings, spiked with a range of spices, and boosted with plenty of spinach. It’s so delicious, and simple, week-night friendly, and great for leftovers. Also, no shame in using frozen spinach, here. It cuts the already minimal prep time here down to near nothing. Enjoy!

Curried Tomato Tortellini Soup

There are a bunch of other whole food plant-based “box checker” recipes here as well, and throughout the archives.

Curried Tomato Tortellini Soup

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The Best Simple Cauliflower Soup

This is the simplest of cauliflower soups. And it is so incredibly good. The ingredient list is shorter than short, and if you have a great yellow curry paste on hand (or even just a good one), it is worth making.

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This is the simplest cauliflower soup. And it is so incredibly good. The ingredient list is shorter than short, and if you have a great yellow curry paste on hand (or even just a good one), it is worth making.

The Best, Simple Cauliflower Soup Recipe
The way it works is the following. Cook some onions and a bit of garlic in some olive oil. Toss in a few chopped potatoes. Add a bunch of cauliflower, and then flare it our with a jolt of curry paste. Cover the ingredients with water and let it all simmer until tender. The last step is to use a blender to blitz it until smooth into a beautiful cauliflower soup. The Best, Simple Cauliflower Soup Recipe

Best Method for Blended Soups?

I love the super silky texture you get from blending this soup in a high-speed blender, but a hand-blender is B+ level good as well. So, don’t sweat the equipment side of things too much. Also, make sure your ingredients are tender. Not overcooked, but notably tender.

Have Fun with Toppings

I get a little crazy with soup toppings, but you don’t have to. This one is good simple and straight too. Here cauliflower soup is topped with toasted pine nuts, fried shallots, and hemp seeds, and more of the yellow curry paste whisked with a bit of shallot oil. You could also season this with a favorite Indian spice blend, for another take. Or a simple showering of fresh herbs. Play around!

The Best, Simple Cauliflower Soup Recipe

Variations

A number of you have left comments with tweaks you’ve made to the recipe, and I love this! For example, Anna said, “I had a head of cauliflower to use. I didn’t have white or yellow potatoes so I used a sweet potato and left the skins on. Used a couple tablespoons of spicy Vindaloo curry powder. The soup turned out SO GOOD! And it’s a beautiful color from the sweet potato.” Nisa noted, “To make it a little heartier, we added moong dal (hulled yellow mung beans).” 

More blended soups

Don’t stop at cauliflower soup. You can make other blended soups using a very similar approach. This post is just the latest in a long-running series of love letter recipes to simple pureed soups, including (get ready 😉 carrot soup, asparagus soup, green soup, tomato soup, also this broccoli soup. What I’m saying is, blender soups forever. Or, if you want to browse all my favorite soups in one spot, all the soup recipes live here.

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Vegetarian Split Pea Soup

A delicious, simple vegetarian split pea soup made from an impossibly short list of ingredients. Seriously, just five!

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Many of you were enthusiastic about the lentil soup recipe I posted a few weeks back. Today’s split pea soup recipe is similar in spirit. It’s a delicious, healthy, textured soup made from an impossibly short list of ingredients. Seriously, just five! No ham hocks in this version, simply green split peas and onions cooked until tender, partially pureed, seasoned and flared out with toppings.
A Really Great Vegetarian Split Pea Soup
Like many lentil soups, this one delivers many of the same nutritional benefits – a good amount of vegetable protein and plenty of staying power. It is hearty and filling, and even better reheated later in the day. You can find dried split green peas in many natural foods stores, I picked these up in the bin section at Whole Foods Market.
A Really Great Vegetarian Split Pea Soup

Split Pea Soup: Finishing Touches

I like to finish each bowl with a generous drizzle of golden olive oil, a few flecks of lemon zest, and a dusting of smoked paprika to give the soup some smoky depth. If you have scallions or toasted nuts on hand (pictured), great! Toss some on as well.

Hope you enjoy the soup, and for those of you who have never tried split peas, this might be the time to give them a go! 

Variations

A number of you had great suggestions for tweaks and variations in the comments. Here are a couple that stood out.

Renae took the soup in a more herb-forward direction. “This soup is divine. I added fennel and sage to give it a warmer texture. Used almond milk to thin it out while blending.”

Jesper noted, “Great looking soup. Instead of using cubed bouillon, I use the water left over from cooking chick peas. Usually I cook them with an onion, a garlic clove or two, black pepper corns and a bay leaf. The result is a lightly flavored vegetable stock, and it freezes well, too.”

I like Christine’s style, “I like to add a few garnishes like chopped fresh marjoram, oregano, thyme and a good dash of hot sauce! Sometimes a swirl of hot mustard is great too.”

And if you’re looking for more lentil or pulse based soups, I really love this Coconut Red Lentil Soup, and this Green Lentil Soup with Curried Brown Butter

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