Honey Mustard Wings

I used to hate chicken wings. But, OMG, I think I’m officially a convert. These crispy, oven-baked honey mustard wings are so seriously delicious that I’ve craved them every day since I first made them. The simple oven baking technique delivers a surprisingly crispy skin without having to brave hot deep fryer grease, and my basic Honey Mustard Sauce makes an incredible glaze.

The post Honey Mustard Wings appeared first on Budget Bytes.

I used to hate chicken wings. But, OMG, I think I’m officially a convert. These crispy, oven-baked honey mustard wings are so seriously delicious that I’ve craved them every day since I first made them. The simple oven baking technique delivers a surprisingly crispy skin without having to brave hot deep fryer grease, and my basic Honey Mustard Sauce makes an incredible glaze. You just have to try them.

Two trays with honey mustard wings, broccoli, and cups of sauce

Yes, Baked Wings CAN be Crispy

If you fear deep frying, like me, then you’re going to love these baked wings. The trick to getting a nice crispy skin on chicken wings in the oven is the light coating of cornstarch. The cornstarch absorbs some of the fat from the skin as it melts and bakes to an incredibly crispy crunch. It’s just SO EASY and there’s no chance of accidentally burning your face off with splashing grease. ;)

Serve Immediately for Best Results

Kind of like their fried counterpart, these baked honey mustard chicken wings are best when they’re served right after they come out of the oven. If you do need to wait a bit before serving, don’t toss them in the honey mustard sauce until just before serving. The longer the sauce sits on the chicken, the softer the skin will become. For that reason, this recipe is not a great candidate for leftovers.

What to Serve with Honey Mustard Wings

My Honey Mustard Sauce is great for dipping vegetables as well as chicken wings, so I made a little extra so I could serve some broccoli florets along with the wings. You could also do some celery and carrot sticks for more variety. A little bit of classic Creamy Coleslaw would also be a nice side.

Close up of a honey mustard wing being dipped into a cup of honey mustard sauce
Overhead view of honey mustard wings on a tray with broccoli and a cup of sauce

Honey Mustard Wings

These simple oven-baked honey mustard chicken wings are deliciously crispy and are coated in sweet and tangy homemade sauce.
Total Cost $8.04 recipe / $4.02 serving
Prep Time 10 minutes
Cook Time 50 minutes
Total Time 1 hour
Servings 2 5-6 pieces each
Calories 1154.65kcal
Author Beth – Budget Bytes

Ingredients

Baked Chicken Wings

  • 2 lbs. chicken wings or drumettes $6.97
  • 1/4 tsp salt $0.02
  • 1/4 tsp pepper $0.02
  • 1/4 tsp garlic powder $0.02
  • 3 Tbsp cornstarch $0.09

Honey Mustard Sauce*

  • 1/4 cup mayonnaise $0.40
  • 1/2 Tbsp Dijon mustard $0.05
  • 1/2 Tbsp yellow mustard $0.04
  • 1 1/2 Tbsp Honey $0.18
  • 1/2 tsp apple cider vinegar $0.01
  • 1/16 tsp garlic powder $0.01
  • 1/16 tsp paprika $0.01
  • 1/16 tsp salt $0.01
  • 1/8 tsp pepper $0.01

Instructions

  • Preheat the oven to 400ºF. Line a baking sheet with parchment paper or foil, then place two wire cooling racks over top to elevate the chicken wings.
  • In a small bowl, stir together the cornstarch, salt, pepper, and garlic powder. Pat the chicken wings dry, then add them to a bowl with the cornstarch mixture, and stir until the chicken wings are coated.
  • Place the cornstarch coated wings on the prepared baking sheet (on the wire racks). Bake in the oven for 50 minutes, give or take 5 minutes depending on the size of the wings, or until they are light golden brown and the skin is crispy.
  • While the wings are baking, make the honey mustard sauce. Stir together the mayonnaise, Dijon, yellow mustard, honey, vinegar, garlic powder, paprika, salt, and pepper in a bowl.
  • When the chicken wings are finished baking, place them in a clean bowl and pour the honey mustard sauce over top. Stir until the wings are coated. Serve immediately.

Notes

*This recipe makes enough honey mustard to coat the chicken wings. If you’d like enough honey mustard sauce to have extra for dipping, like in the photos, I suggest doubling the sauce ingredients.

Nutrition

Serving: 6wings | Calories: 1154.65kcal | Carbohydrates: 25g | Protein: 79.8g | Fat: 78.8g | Sodium: 1225.75mg | Fiber: 0.45g
Overhead view of honey mustard wings on a tray with broccoli and a cup of sauce

How to Make Honey Mustard Wings – Step by Step Photos

Cornstarch, salt, pepper, and garlic powder in a bowl

Preheat the oven to 400ºF. Line a large baking sheet with parchment paper or foil, then place two wire cooling racks on top (this holds the chicken above the surface of the baking sheet). In a small bowl, stir together 3 Tbsp cornstarch, ¼ tsp salt, ¼ tsp pepper, and ¼ tsp garlic powder.

Raw chicken wings on a cutting board

Pat dry 2 lbs. chicken wings or drumettes, or both, with paper towel.

Cornstarch mixture being poured over the wings in a bowl

Place the chicken wings in a large bowl, then pour the cornstarch mixture over top. Stir the wings until they are lightly and evenly coated in cornstarch.

Chicken wings on the baking sheet ready to bake

Place the chicken wings on the prepared baking sheet, spaced out so they are not touching.

Baked chicken wings on the baking sheet

Bake the chicken wings in the preheated 400ºF oven for 50 minutes, or until they are golden brown and crispy (they will not get deeply browned). Total baking time will vary depending on the size of your wings.

Honey mustard sauce ingredients in a bowl

While the wings are baking, prepare the honey mustard sauce. In a bowl combine ¼ cup mayonnaise, ½ Tbsp Dijon mustard, ½ Tbsp yellow mustard, 1.5 Tbsp honey, ½ tsp apple cider vinegar, 1/16 tsp garlic powder, 1/16 tsp paprika, 1/16 salt, and ⅛ tsp pepper. This is enough honey mustard to coat the wings. If you want extra for dipping, double the sauce.

honey mustard being poured over baked wings in a bowl

Place the baked wings in a clean bowl and pour the honey mustard sauce over top.

Finished honey mustard wings in a bowl

Toss the wings until they are coated in the honey mustard sauce and then serve immediately!

Two trays of honey mustard wings with broccoli and sauce

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Balsamic Roasted Mushrooms

Balsamic roasted mushrooms are an easy side dish or appetizer, soaked in garlic, herbs, and tangy balsamic vinegar for maximum flavor.

The post Balsamic Roasted Mushrooms appeared first on Budget Bytes.

I first made these Balsamic Roasted Mushrooms as part of a bowl meal with Mashed potatoes and kale, but they really are so amazing that they deserve a post of their own. Whether you’re eating these as a side dish with your dinner or just digging in with a toothpick as an appetizer, they’re so good that you’ll want to make them for every occasion.

Overhead view of balsamic roasted mushrooms in a white bowl, garnished with parsley

What Kind of Mushrooms Should I Use?

I suggest using either white button mushrooms or baby bella mushrooms for this recipe (I’ve made this with both and they’re equally incredible). While it may work with other mushroom varieties, the cooking time may change depending on the size and moisture content of the mushrooms, and unfortunately, I haven’t tested other varieties to know for sure.

What to Serve with Balsamic Roasted Mushrooms

As I mentioned in the introduction, these tasty little mushrooms make a great side dish, part of a bowl meal, or even an appetizer. They’re so good you will just want to eat them straight out of the bowl with a fork (or toothpick)! Originally I paired them with some kale mashed potatoes as a vegetarian bowl meal, but they’d also go great with Garlic Marinated Chicken, Honey Mustard Pork Chops, or Herb Roasted Pork Loin.

What Kind of Roasting Dish Should I Use?

I find that a ceramic or glass works best for this recipe because they transmit heat a little more slowly and evenly. Something like a thin metal baking dish may result in too much evaporation and cause the mushrooms to dry out while roasting.

Side view of balsamic roasted vegetables in a bowl
Overhead view of balsamic roasted mushrooms in a white bowl

Balsamic Roasted Mushrooms

Balsamic roasted mushrooms are an easy side dish or appetizer, soaked in garlic, herbs, and tangy balsamic vinegar for maximum flavor.
Total Cost $4.24 recipe / $1.06 serving
Prep Time 10 minutes
Cook Time 45 minutes
Total Time 55 minutes
Servings 4
Calories 77.5kcal
Author Beth – Budget Bytes

Ingredients

  • 1 lb. mushrooms* $3.38
  • 1 Tbsp olive oil $0.16
  • 3 Tbsp balsamic vinegar $0.41
  • 1/2 Tbsp brown sugar $0.02
  • 1 Tbsp soy sauce $0.06
  • 2 cloves garlic $0.16
  • 1/4 tsp dried thyme $0.03
  • 1/4 tsp freshly cracked black pepper $0.02

Instructions

  • Preheat the oven to 400ºF. Clean any dirt or debris from the mushrooms, then slice any large mushrooms in half (you can leave them whole if they are small).
  • Mince the garlic. In a small bowl combine the olive oil, balsamic vinegar, brown sugar, soy sauce, garlic, thyme, and pepper.
  • Place the mushrooms in a ceramic or glass baking dish (choose a size that keeps the mushrooms close together, mostly in a single layer). Pour the marinade over top and stir to coat the mushrooms.
  • Roast the mushrooms for about 45 minutes, stirring every 15 minutes. The mushrooms should release liquid as they roast, leaving liquid in the bottom of the dish until the last 15 minutes or so. If the dish dries up before the final 15 minutes, cover the dish with foil to prevent furhter evaporation or burning.
  • After 45 minutes of roasting, give them a final stir and then serve. (I garnished with chopped parsley for color, but this is not necessary for flavor.)

Notes

*White button or baby bella mushrooms

Nutrition

Serving: 1serving | Calories: 77.5kcal | Carbohydrates: 8.85g | Protein: 2.85g | Fat: 3.93g | Sodium: 293.93mg | Fiber: 1.55g
Close up view of a balsamic roasted mushroom on a fork with the bowl in the background

Love Balsamic Vinegar? Try these other recipes featuring balsamic vinegar:

How to Make Balsamic Roasted Mushrooms – Step by Step Photos

Sliced Mushrooms in a baking dish

Preheat the oven to 400ºF. Clean 1 lb. of mushrooms and slice any larger mushrooms in half (the mushrooms I had today were all very large, so some I even cut into quarters). Place the mushrooms in a baking dish. Choose a size that will allow the mushrooms to be close together, but mostly in a single layer.

Balsamic mushroom marinade in a bowl

Mince two cloves of garlic and combine them in a bowl with 1 Tbsp olive oil, 3 Tbsp balsamic vinegar, ½ Tbsp brown sugar, 1 Tbsp soy sauce, ¼ tsp dried thyme, and ¼ tsp freshly cracked pepper.

Marinade being poured over the mushrooms in the dish.

Pour the marinade over the mushrooms in the dish and give them a good stir.

Seasoned mushrooms in the dish before roasting

The mushrooms will absorb most of the marinade, leaving just a little in the bottom of the dish, but as the mushrooms roast they will release a lot of moisture. (The photo above is before roasting)

Mushrooms after 30 minutes of roasting

Roast the mushrooms in the preheated 400ºF oven, stirring every 15 minutes. The photo above is after 30 minutes of roasting. There should be a decent amount of liquid in the bottom of the dish at this point. If it is already dry, cover the dish with foil to prevent further evaporation and burning.

Mushrooms after 45 minutes of roasting

After 45 minutes of roasting, most of the liquid on the bottom of the dish will have evaporated.

Stirred roasted mushrooms in the dish

Give the mushrooms a stir to kind of distribute the reduced marinade over the surface of the mushrooms. And that’s it! They’re ready to serve!

Overhead view of balsamic roasted mushrooms in a bowl garnished with chopped parsley

I garnished it with chopped parsley just for some color, but this isn’t needed to flavor the mushrooms. Enjoy!

The post Balsamic Roasted Mushrooms appeared first on Budget Bytes.

How to Make a Thanksgiving Grazing Board

Whether you feel like you want to skip the Thanksgiving dinner all together, or you need something to keep the hungry mouths busy while you’re preparing the big meal, a Thanksgiving grazing board is a great option.

The post How to Make a Thanksgiving Grazing Board appeared first on Budget Bytes.

I have to come clean about something. I’ve spent more years than not actively avoiding cooking a Thanksgiving dinner. Pandemic or not, my boyfriend and I often eat some version of this Thanksgiving Grazing Board below instead of a full Thanksgiving dinner. This grazing board is festive, it’s easy, it’s all of my most favorite foods on one tray, and it pairs perfectly with wine and a day of relaxing. And OMG, so much easier than a full meal. 😅

So whether you feel like you just want to skip the big meal all together, or you need something to keep the hungry mouths busy while you’re preparing the big meal, a Thanksgiving grazing board is a great option.

P.S. If you’re like me and would be just as happy with a grazing board of goodies instead of a traditional Thanksgiving meal, give me a shout in the comments so I don’t feel like I’m a weirdo. 😅

Overhead view of a Thanksgiving grazing board

What Goes on a Grazing Board?

When building a grazing board, I like to have items from the following categories: meat, cheese, fruit, bread, dips or spreads, nuts, and pickled vegetables. That way you have an excellent mix of sweet, salty, crunchy, creamy, acidic, and maybe even spicy, that can all be mixed and matched into an endless combination of delicious bites. I think I just described my heaven.

Oh, and garnishes are always a nice touch, if you want it to look pretty. And food that looks pretty is always more fun.

Thanksgiving Grazing Board Options

For each of the categories I listed above, I’ll list what I used as well as some alternate ideas that stay in that Thanksgiving/fall theme, so you can easily build your own custom board.

Meat: I used salami medallions and slices of roasted turkey. Other ideas include: peppered salami, prosciutto, honey ham, genoa salami, or soppressata.

Cheese: I included brie, smoked cheddar, and aged gouda in my Thanksgiving Grazing Board. You want to try to have a variety of textures and flavors. Here are some other cheese options (try not to choose two from any category):

  • Creamy: Chevre, Camembert, Burrata
  • Hard: Parmesan, Manchego, Pecorino, aged cheddar or gouda
  • Slicing cheeses: Cheddar, Provolone, Havarti, Swiss
  • Blue: Roquefort, Stilton, Blue

Fruit: I included grapes and pears on my grazing board, as well as a few dried apricots and dried cranberries to fill in the nooks and crannies. Other fall-inspired fruits could include: apples, pomegranates, figs, or satsumas.

Bread: I used a variety of crackers (from a variety pack) to provide multiple shapes and textures on the board. I also sliced up a baguette and offered that on the side, since there wasn’t much more room on the board for bulky pieces of bread. You can use virtually any type of cracker or sliced bread for your grazing board.

Dips and Spreads: I included whole-berry cranberry sauce, honey, and Dijon mustard. Other fall-inspired spreads include: fig jam, pumpkin or apple butter, whole grain mustard or spicy honey.

Nuts: I used a few pecan halves that I had in my pantry to fill in the gaps on the board, but candied walnuts, almonds, or pecans would also be a nice festive touch.

Pickled Vegetables: I ran out of room to include any pickled vegetables on my tray, but they really do offer a nice flavor contrast to the rest of the items and I usually try to include at least one. Sweet mini gherkins would be my preference for the flavor profile of this Thanksgiving Grazing Board, but a classic olive is always nice, too.

Garnishes: I went with a couple of mini pumpkins and rosemary sprigs for my garnish, since I already had both on hand. Another fun option would be to get some fake or fresh sunflowers, fake leaves, or fake pinecones.

Close up view of a Thanksgiving Grazing Board

How to Save Money on Your Grazing Board

It’s so easy to go overboard when buying meats, cheeses, and other specialty ingredients, so here are my tips for keeping your costs in check:

  • Stick to one or two items from each category. You’ll run out of room on your board faster than you think!
  • Check your fridge and pantry for shelf-stable items you may already have on hand: nuts, dried fruit, mustard, jam, honey, etc.
  • Buy a variety pack of crackers rather than multiple boxes of single crackers. Crackers are always strangely expensive, IMHO.
  • Check for a discount bin at your grocer’s deli section. A lot of deli department will place pre-sliced meats and cheese, or even specialty cheeses on discount when they get close to their sell-by date! If you don’t see a discount section, ask! You can save big using this method, just make sure to buy the discounted items no more than 1-2 days before you plan on serving your grazing board.
  • Use a baking sheet as your “board” (this white enameled baking sheet is linked in my shop). No one is going to see it through all of those beautiful cheeses anyway! Haha! If your baking sheets are looking a little worse for wear, lay down a piece of parchment paper first.
Side view of Thanksgiving Grazing Board

How Much Does a Thanksgiving Grazing Board Cost?

This board cost me about $27.54, with leftovers of most of the ingredients that I could refill as the board gets eaten down (almost two boards-worth of ingredients). I literally “grazed” on this board and the leftovers all week long. Here is a breakdown of what I purchased and what I already had on hand:

Purchased:

  • Salami $3.99
  • Turkey slices $2.99
  • Brie $2.99
  • Smoked cheddar $3.49
  • Aged gouda $3.69
  • Grapes $3.53
  • Pears $1.59
  • Cranberry sauce $0.89
  • Crackers $2.89
  • Baguette $1.49

On hand (I didn’t measure these ingredients so I can’t calculate estimate costs):

  • Honey
  • Mustard
  • Pecans
  • Dried Cranberries
  • Dried Apricots
  • Mini-pumpkins
  • Fresh rosemary

How to Make A Thanksgiving Grazing Board – Step by Step Photos and Styling Tips

pumpkins and sauces on the grazing board

I like to start my board with any larger items and dips and spreads. I find that the little bowls or dishes of spreads make great central pieces to “wrap” other food around. So here I have a bowl of cranberry sauce, two small cups with mustard and honey, and two mini-pumpkins. I also like to avoid having the board look too symmetrical, so I just sort of scattered these pieces around the board.

grapes and pears added to the board

Next I added the grapes and pears because again, these are larger items that will be difficult to place once more ingredients are added. I left half of the pear whole for visual appeal. More pear can be sliced as the the board gets eaten (I actually purchased two pears, so I had an extra waiting to be sliced).

Cheeses added to the board

Next I went in with the cheeses. In addition to having a variety and flavors of cheeses, you want to present them in a variety of ways. Hard aged cheeses look beautiful when crumbled. Slicing cheeses, like cheddar, are great as slices or cubes, and softer cheeses are good to present whole or in larger pieces that people can slice off or scoop up as needed.

Meats added to the grazing board

Now it’s time for the meat. Again, you want to present the meat in a variety of ways to really maximize the visual texture of the board. There isn’t a lot you can do with these little salami medallions, so I just piled them on to make the board look “abundant.” For the turkey slices, I rolled them into cigars. If you have thin slices of salami or cured meat, it’s fun to fold them in half, then in half again to create a sort of ruffled appearance.

Crackers added to the board

Next came the crackers. I like to fan the crackers out and snake them around other items.

Nuts and dried fruit added to empty spots

Now the board should be very full, save a few very small blank spots. I used small items like nuts and dried fruit to fill in the blanks.

Garnishes added to the grazing board

And finally, I added a few rosemary sprigs as a garnish. The board looks abundant, full of color, texture, and flavor, while still having a distinct fall theme.

Side view of a Thanksgiving grazing board

What Else Might I Need?

If you do decide to make a Thanksgiving Grazing Board this year, don’t forget some plates, napkins, and toothpicks! Oh, and bring your appetite, too. ;)

The post How to Make a Thanksgiving Grazing Board appeared first on Budget Bytes.

Sesame Cucumber Salad

This salad is one of the very first recipes I ever posted on Budget Bytes. Like, way back when I was still taking photos with my pre-smart-phone era phone. Yikes! Because this Sesame Cucumber Salad is still one of my favorite dishes and my favorite way to use up all those delicious and inexpensive summer […]

The post Sesame Cucumber Salad appeared first on Budget Bytes.

This salad is one of the very first recipes I ever posted on Budget Bytes. Like, way back when I was still taking photos with my pre-smart-phone era phone. Yikes! Because this Sesame Cucumber Salad is still one of my favorite dishes and my favorite way to use up all those delicious and inexpensive summer cucumbers, I had to repost it and give it the proper attention it needs. So, if this Sesame Cucumber recipe is new to you, I hope it becomes one of your go-to fav’s as it has for me. It will serve you well!

Originally posted July 2019, updated 7-9-2020.

A bowl of Sesame Cucumber Salad from above, chopsticks on the side

Do I Have to Use Rice Vinegar?

I strongly urge you not to substitute the rice vinegar in this recipe. Rice vinegar has a uniquely mild flavor and acidity that is just perfect for this recipe. While people have substituted the rice vinegar with white vinegar or apple cider vinegar, I find them both a bit too strong for this recipe. Also, be mindful not to use “seasoned” rice vinegar, which has other ingredients added and tastes quite different.

Where Do You Find Rice Vinegar?

Rice vinegar is fairly inexpensive, can be found in the Asian section of most major grocery stores, and will stay good in your pantry for just about forever. If you make Budget Bytes recipes on the regular, I promise it will get used again! In fact, here is a direct link to all the recipes on my website that use Rice Vinegar.

What is Toasted Sesame Oil?

The other key ingredient in this cucumber salad is toasted sesame oil. Unlike regular sesame oil, toasted sesame oil has a very strong nutty flavor and a little bit can really add a LOT of flavor to any dish. You can find toasted sesame oil in the international aisle of most major grocery stores, or Asian grocery stores. It may not say “toasted” on the label, but you’ll know it is toasted by the deep walnut color. Untoasted sesame oil is a light straw color, like canola oil.

How Long Does This Salad Last?

This salad does get kind of limp in the refrigerator fairly quickly, but it’s still insanely good once the cucumbers soften. They’re almost like pickled cucumber slices at that point. They’ve been marinating in the spicy-sweet vinegar solution and are just totally delicious! I enjoy this salad for about 2-3 days after making it (if I don’t eat it all sooner). If you like your cucumbers to stay crunchy, try cutting them into chunks instead of thin slices.

Side view of a bowl of sesame cucumber salad, chopsticks picking up one slice of cucumber

 
Side view of a bowl of sesame cucumber salad, chopsticks picking up one slice of cucumber

Sesame Cucumber Salad

Sesame Cucumber Salad is light, refreshing, and vibrant in flavor. It's the perfect summer side dish or companion to any Southeast Asian inspired meal.
Total Cost $2.44 recipe / $0.41 serving
Prep Time 15 minutes
Total Time 15 minutes
Servings 6
Calories 62.82kcal
Author Beth - Budget Bytes

Ingredients

DRESSING

  • 1/3 cup rice vinegar $0.70
  • 2 Tbsp granulated sugar $0.02
  • 1/2 tsp toasted sesame oil $0.05
  • 1/4 crushed red pepper $0.02
  • 1/2 tsp salt $0.02
  • 2 large cucumbers $1.38
  • 3 green onions $0.13
  • 1/4 cup chopped peanuts $0.12

Instructions

  • In a small bowl, combine the rice vinegar, sugar, sesame oil, crushed red pepper, and salt. Set the dressing aside.
  • Peel and slice the cucumber using your favorite method (see photos below for my technique). Place the sliced cucumbers in a large bowl.
  • Chop the peanuts into smaller pieces. Slice the green onions.
  • Add the peanuts, green onions, and dressing to the sliced cucumbers. Stir to combine. Serve immediately or refrigerate until ready to eat. Give the salad a brief stir before serving to redistribute the dressing and flavors.

Video

Nutrition

Serving: 1Serving | Calories: 62.82kcal | Carbohydrates: 7.63g | Protein: 1.87g | Fat: 3.1g | Sodium: 199.82mg | Fiber: 1.4g

Scroll down for the step by step photos!

Overhead view of a bowl full of sesame cucumber salad

How to Make Sesame Cucumber Salad – Step by Step Photos

Spicy vinegar dressing in a bowl

Start by making the dressing. In a small bowl, stir together 1/3 cup rice vinegar, 2 Tbsp granulated sugar, 1/2 tsp toasted sesame oil, 1/4 tsp red pepper flakes, and 1/2 tsp salt. Set the dressing aside.

Bottle of toasted sesame oil and a bottle of rice vinegar

Here is the toasted sesame oil and rice vinegar that I used. The sesame oil is from Aldi and the rice vinegar is from Kroger.

Two cucumbers, one half peeled

Peel and slice two large cucumbers however you like. I like to remove strips of the peel to create a cool striped effect once they’re sliced. If you don’t like cucumber seeds, you can slice the cucumber lengthwise before slicing into rounds and use a spoon to scrape out the seeds in the center.

Two cucumbers, one mostly sliced

I prefer thin slices so that there is more surface area to come into contact with the dressing. The thinner slices will become soft and wobbly after storing them in the dressing, but I kind of like that, too. If you prefer them to stay crunchy longer, you’ll want to do thicker slices. 

Sliced green onion and chopped peanuts

Roughly chop 1/4 cup peanuts and slice 3 green onions.

Dressing being poured over cucumbers, green onion, and peanuts

Place the sliced cucumbers in a large bowl, add the sliced green onion and chopped peanuts, then pour the dressing over top.

Finished sesame cucumber salad in the bowl

Finally, stir it all up and you’re ready to eat! Serve it immediately or refrigerate for later.

Side view of a bowl full of sesame cucumber salad, chopsticks on the side

The flavors do get really good as it sits in the fridge, although the cucumbers get softer (some people don’t like that–I kind of do!). Either way, this Thai Cucumber Salad is super refreshing and delicious. It always has been and always will be my favorite!

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