Ottolenghi’s New Book Will Change the Way You Look at Onions

The cover of Yotam Ottolenghi and Ixta Belfrage’s new cookbook, Flavor—which, the authors write, was almost named The Ottolenghi F-Bomb—is a sea of marble-sized shallots, bobbing among chestnuts, grapes, and garlic. Meanwhile, the U.K. cover is a Georg…

The cover of Yotam Ottolenghi and Ixta Belfrage's new cookbook, Flavor—which, the authors write, was almost named The Ottolenghi F-Bomb—is a sea of marble-sized shallots, bobbing among chestnuts, grapes, and garlic. Meanwhile, the U.K. cover is a Georgia O'Keefe–esque onion illustration. There’s a pattern here.

Of course, there are many more vegetables covered in a cookbook all about vegetables. (Of the 100 recipes, 45 are vegan, though flexitarian flavor boosters like eggs, anchovies, and Parmesan appear throughout.) You’ll find charred peppers with fresh corn polenta, cauliflower roasted in chile butter, tempura-fried beet stems with a tangerine dunk.

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The #1 Book for All Things Vegetable

This review is part of our community-driven book tournament, The Big Community Book-Off. With your help, we’re finding the best books across categories (from bread to pasta, one-bowl to weeknight-friendly, and cake to cookies, to name a few), and putti…

This review is part of our community-driven book tournament, The Big Community Book-Off. With your help, we’re finding the best books across categories (from bread to pasta, one-bowl to weeknight-friendly, and cake to cookies, to name a few), and putting them through a series of rigorous reviews—considered, tested, and written by none other than you. And so, let’s hand it off to our community members Erin, Ruth, and Shereen. Here are their reviews of your five favorite vegetable-forward books—and their nail-biting verdict on which one reigned supreme.


When a Food52 editor connected the three of us over email, we quickly figured out what we had in common. Nope, we’re not vegetarians, not one of us. But we’re all obsessed with fresh produce and cook vegetarian much of the time.

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One-Ingredient Date Jam Is Excellent on Anything

Typically speaking, jam is a mixture of fruit and sugar—often lemon juice, sometimes pectin—cooked until glossy and thick and as spreadable as soft butter. But this recipe stops at the fruit.

And not fresh fruit either. While preserving is a simple wa…

Typically speaking, jam is a mixture of fruit and sugar—often lemon juice, sometimes pectin—cooked until glossy and thick and as spreadable as soft butter. But this recipe stops at the fruit.

And not fresh fruit either. While preserving is a simple way to stretch the seasons—to carry spring strawberries into summer, summer peaches into fall—dried fruit is evergreen, shelf-stable, and, it turns out, just as jam-able.

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Kefir-Ranch Dip Is Good for Your Gut. It Tastes Really Good, Too.

The title of Lindsay Maitland Hunt’s latest cookbook, which released this summer, says it all. Help Yourself: A Guide to Gut Health for People Who Love Delicious Food. It’s an ambitious, flavor-forward collection that covers everything from digestive s…

The title of Lindsay Maitland Hunt's latest cookbook, which released this summer, says it all. Help Yourself: A Guide to Gut Health for People Who Love Delicious Food. It's an ambitious, flavor-forward collection that covers everything from digestive system basics, to microbiota science, to leaky gut syndrome. And everyday recipes are what tie it all together. In the excerpt below, Lindsay breaks down her approach to eating good and feeling good. Also included: a couple recipes from the book that you'll want to make ASAP.


If you grew up with the USDA food pyramid, it’s likely that these guidelines and my food pyramid will look a little different to you. Once you start eating with your microbes in mind, these are the things that are crucial. How you source ingredients matters, too, not just for your gut but for the health of the planet. These are by no means rules; rather, they are meant to encourage and educate you about the best-case scenario.

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Brown Butter Chicken & Other Recipes That Inspire Ina Garten

Ina Garten’s 12th cookbook, Modern Comfort Food, comes out in less than one week, and to say we’re giddy about it would be an enormous understatement. It’s full of flavor-forward, feel-good food (think: tuna melts, beef stew, truffled mac and cheese), …

Ina Garten's 12th cookbook, Modern Comfort Food, comes out in less than one week, and to say we're giddy about it would be an enormous understatement. It's full of flavor-forward, feel-good food (think: tuna melts, beef stew, truffled mac and cheese), which, considering the year thus far, is exactly what all of us need right now. In the excerpt below, Ina talks about how she stays inspired. Also included: three must-make recipes from the book—the only question is, which will you make first?


People ask me all the time how I get inspired. The truth is, after writing twelve cookbooks, it’s not always easy to think of new ideas, so I look for inspiration everywhere. A dish I order in a restaurant or specialty food store might intrigue me. I love to cruise grocery stores and farmers’ markets looking for new ingredients like shishito peppers, fig spread, or truffle butter. In the past few years, social media has also become one of my biggest sources of inspiration; it’s not uncommon for me to see something on Instagram that gets me running to the kitchen.

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2020’s Best Interior Design Books Put Comfort & Creativity First

Design has always been about the power of imagination. But this year, when being indoors made it much easier to take stock of what our spaces could be, design has taken on a certain level of much-needed hope. While the outside world might continue to b…

Design has always been about the power of imagination. But this year, when being indoors made it much easier to take stock of what our spaces could be, design has taken on a certain level of much-needed hope. While the outside world might continue to be trying, with some effort, our homes (aka, our inner worlds) can be spaces full of comfort, calm, and inspiration. At least that’s the sentiment we felt as we gathered together our favorite interior design books of 2020.

These 12 titles feature well-known blogger and designer names alongside up-and-comers, and small footprint homes next to more expansive spaces. They detail useful tidbits on layering pieces in a living room and also describe the intricate histories behind those objects. And whether they rev up dreams of a renovation or simply remind you of the cabinet that could use your attention, they aim to inspire readers who want to make a home that fulfills them, now and in the years to come.

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The Whole-Roasted Broccoli Eden Grinshpan Eats Multiple Times in a Week

“When I look around the table and see a collection of double-dipping, hand-eating, pants-unbuttoning guests, I know it’s been a successful night,” chef and Top Chef Canada host Eden Grinshpan writes in her first cookbook, Eating Out Loud, which debuted…

“When I look around the table and see a collection of double-dipping, hand-eating, pants-unbuttoning guests, I know it’s been a successful night,” chef and Top Chef Canada host Eden Grinshpan writes in her first cookbook, Eating Out Loud, which debuted earlier this month.

Grinshpan, who is half Israeli and grew up in Toronto, learned to embrace this unshy, unfussy approach to food while living in Israel. She and her family travelled there for countless summers and, eventually, Grinshpan moved there after graduating from Le Cordon Bleu in London.

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A Book of 100 Cookies? Yeah, You Need It.

“I am still in awe of how many people are making pan-banging cookies on a daily basis,” award-winning blogger Sarah Kieffer wrote to me this week.

Maybe, probably, you’re one of those people who couldn’t resist the Instagram whirlwind of DVD-sized coo…

“I am still in awe of how many people are making pan-banging cookies on a daily basis,” award-winning blogger Sarah Kieffer wrote to me this week.

Maybe, probably, you’re one of those people who couldn’t resist the Instagram whirlwind of DVD-sized cookies, boasting more ripples than a pond you just dropped something into. (If you’re not familiar, yet, see here, here, and here—and you might as well heat your oven while you’re at it.)

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How a 1661 ‘Ladies Directory’ Blazed the Trail for Contemporary Cookbooks

Anne Willan is the award-winning culinary historian, cookbook writer, and founder of La Varenne Cooking School in Paris. In her latest book, Women in the Kitchen, released last month, she introduces us to 12 cookbook writers “who defined the way we eat…

Anne Willan is the award-winning culinary historian, cookbook writer, and founder of La Varenne Cooking School in Paris. In her latest book, Women in the Kitchen, released last month, she introduces us to 12 cookbook writers "who defined the way we eat"—stretching from 1661 to modern day. Below, in an excerpt from the book, we'll start at the beginning: Get to know trailblazer Hannah Woolley.


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The first handbook written in English by a woman for women was published in 1661, almost two hundred years after the first cookbook was printed (in Latin). In The Ladies Directory, Hannah Woolley began to reveal not just her own life but a whole new world for her readers, that of the expanding English middle class of prosperous tradesmen, physicians, and the like, all of them profiting from the newly restored monarchy of King Charles II. In a group of later books Woolley elaborated on the skills called for in the domestic kitchen, a very different world from the grand establishments of the professional male cooks who had hitherto dominated the cookbook scene.

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