How to Shop For Cheese, According to An Expert

That Cheese Plate is a column by Marissa Mullen—cookbook author, photographer, and Food52’s Resident Cheese Plater. With Marissa’s expertise in all things cheddar, comté, and crudité—plus tips for how to make it all look extra special, using stuff you …

That Cheese Plate is a column by Marissa Mullen—cookbook author, photographer, and Food52's Resident Cheese Plater. With Marissa's expertise in all things cheddar, comté, and crudité—plus tips for how to make it all look extra special, using stuff you probably have on hand—we'll be crafting our own cheesy masterpieces without a hitch. This month, Marissa is sharing how to make the most out of shopping for cheese.


Shopping for cheese can be an intimidating process. There are countless styles to choose from, wide price ranges, different milk types, and many countries of origin. In my years of cheese plating, I’ve learned to always invest in good cheese, specifically cheese from a farmstead or small-batch dairy farm. Typically at these smaller operations, the animals are treated sustainably, and the cheesemaking process isn’t completely mechanically produced. The cheese is the base of your creation, acting as the founding flavors to build pairings upon. With high-quality cheese, the sensory experience is much more impactful.

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Greek Pasta Salad

Greek Pasta Salad is loaded with fresh vegetables, feta cheese, and a homemade Greek dressing to create the best pasta salad you’ll ever eat. Make it for lunch or serve it as a side with dinner. I don’t know about you, but I love having a small list of go-to recipes every season that I …

The post Greek Pasta Salad appeared first on My Baking Addiction.

Greek Pasta Salad is loaded with fresh vegetables, feta cheese, and a homemade Greek dressing to create the best pasta salad you’ll ever eat. Make it for lunch or serve it as a side with dinner.

Serving bowl filled with greek pasta salad with a drink and smaller bowl of salad in the background

I don’t know about you, but I love having a small list of go-to recipes every season that I can can whip up for just about any occasion.

This Greek Pasta Salad is my go-to salad for birthday parties, barbecues, or even just a random Tuesday night.

Serve it up with a side of grilled chicken and you have the perfect summer weeknight dinner.

(more…)

The post Greek Pasta Salad appeared first on My Baking Addiction.

From 2 Goats to Churning Out Award-Winning Cheeses—the Story of Cypress Grove

We’ve teamed up with Cypress Grove to share the story behind their award-winning goat cheeses—from the iconic Humboldt Fog to new favorites like their smooth and buttery Little Giant.

Most cheeses aren’t conceived of in dreams, but that’s exactly ho…

We’ve teamed up with Cypress Grove to share the story behind their award-winning goat cheeses—from the iconic Humboldt Fog to new favorites like their smooth and buttery Little Giant.


Most cheeses aren’t conceived of in dreams, but that’s exactly how Cypress Grove’s fan-favorite Humboldt Fog came about.

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Greek Quinoa Salad

I am always looking for ways to mix up my salad routine and this Greek Quinoa Salad is a GOOD one. It has all of the same flavors as a traditional Greek Salad, but the quinoa makes it super hearty. It is great served along side our Greek Chicken Kabobs…

I am always looking for ways to mix up my salad routine and this Greek Quinoa Salad is a GOOD one. It has all of the same flavors as a traditional Greek Salad, but the quinoa makes it super hearty. It is great served along side our Greek Chicken Kabobs, Greek Turkey Meatballs, grilled vegetables,…

The post Greek Quinoa Salad appeared first on Two Peas & Their Pod.

The Best Cheese for Cheeseburgers, Period

That Cheese Plate is a column by Marissa Mullen—cookbook author, photographer, and Food52’s Resident Cheese Plater. With Marissa’s expertise all things cheddar, comté, and crudité—plus tips for how to make it all look extra special, using stuff you pro…

That Cheese Plate is a column by Marissa Mullen—cookbook author, photographer, and Food52's Resident Cheese Plater. With Marissa's expertise all things cheddar, comté, and crudité—plus tips for how to make it all look extra special, using stuff you probably have on hand—we'll be crafting our own cheesy masterpieces without a hitch. This month, Marissa is sharing her thoughts on the best possible cheese to melt on a burger, inspired by the Absolute Best Tests column.


It was in 1934 that the term “cheeseburger” was first coined, on the menu at Kaelin’s restaurant in Louisville, Kentucky. They topped a patty with American cheese in the hopes of adding a “new tang to the hamburger,” and this now-classic staple would soon appear everywhere from diners to backyards, all across the U.S. Over the years, the cheeseburger has morphed from its humble origins—sometimes so much that the folks at Kaelin’s probably wouldn’t recognize it as the same dish. Restaurants love to experiment with various toppings and condiments, from sautéed mushrooms and crispy onions to aioli and pickle relish, to transform the traditional cheeseburger into something new. At the core, however, the cheeseburger always relies on a ground beef base and gooey cheese topping.

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Is There Anything Triple-Cream Cheese Can’t Do?

Every month, Melina Hammer, Food52’s very own Hudson Valley correspondent, is serving up all the bounty that upstate New York has to offer.

I have long loved triple-cream cheeses. They contain at least 75 percent fat, and are typically young. They a…

Every month, Melina Hammer, Food52's very own Hudson Valley correspondent, is serving up all the bounty that upstate New York has to offer.


I have long loved triple-cream cheeses. They contain at least 75 percent fat, and are typically young. They are also supremely spreadable. Mascarpone is an example of a fresh triple-cream, whereas Brillat-Savarin, Explorateur, and St. André are soft-ripened. Think of this sort of cheese as an extra luxurious, extra creamy Brie—velvety, decadent, and easy to combine with savory or sweet pairings. France has historically cornered the market on triple-cream cheeses (they originated there in the 19th century), but today there are several wonderful ones made in the United States. So when I discovered a triple-cream being produced right in my own region, I had to learn more. Meet Four Fat Fowl, an award-winning creamery—then get cooking. (This interview has been edited and condensed for length and clarity.)

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Marche des Producteurs de Pays

This week France rather quietly announced that visitors from the U.S. and Canada were allowed to come to the country without any restrictions. Things are still moving in the direction of getting back to normal, and while last year is still sort of a haze to me, I believe the markets in Paris remained open the entire time, operating under different conditions. Outdoor markets are…

This week France rather quietly announced that visitors from the U.S. and Canada were allowed to come to the country without any restrictions. Things are still moving in the direction of getting back to normal, and while last year is still sort of a haze to me, I believe the markets in Paris remained open the entire time, operating under different conditions. Outdoor markets are extremely important in France and, of course, pre-dated les supermarchés which are now everywhere and have more agreeable hours – some are now even open on Sundays, which was controversial when it happened. But the outdoor markets take place six days a week in Paris, and in a country where holidays and vacations, and Sundays, are sacred, they remain open no matter what, even on Christmas, Easter, and New Year’s Day.

The outdoor markets are an integral part of French life and while in Paris there are over 100 marchés alimentaires (food markets), many of the stands are run by négotiants, or middle-men and women, who get their fruits, vegetables, meats, poultry, and fish from Rungis, the wholesale market outside of the city. There are many small farms in France but many stay, and sell, only in their regions due to their size. So I’m always happy when I see signs posted about an upcoming Marché des Producteurs de Pays, where you can buy things directly from the growers and producers, who bring their foods to the city.

Continue Reading Marche des Producteurs de Pays...

Ranch Pasta Salad

Ranch Pasta Salad, made with Hidden Valley Ranch seasoning, is a delicious and easy potluck pasta salad that is perfect
The post Ranch Pasta Salad appeared first on Easy Side Dish Recipes.

Ranch Pasta Salad, made with Hidden Valley Ranch seasoning, is a delicious and easy potluck pasta salad that is perfect

The post Ranch Pasta Salad appeared first on Easy Side Dish Recipes.

Easy Frittata Recipe

Here’s the best egg frittata recipe: perfect for breakfast, lunch or dinner! This basic filling is fast and tasty, or…

A Couple Cooks – Recipes worth repeating.

Here’s the best egg frittata recipe: perfect for breakfast, lunch or dinner! This basic filling is fast and tasty, or any veggies you like.

Frittata

Got eggs and need a meal? Enter, The Frittata! A frittata is an Italian dish that’s best described as a crustless egg pie. It’s often served for breakfast or brunch, but it works for dinner too. You can eat it at any temperature and it saves well: and it’s great for using up odds and ends in your veggie drawer. In fact, we think it’s one of the essential non-recipes every home cook should know!

How to make a frittata: basic formula

Everyone has their own method for making a frittata, and to be honest: there are some duds out there. Many frittata recipes we’ve tried are tasteless, rubbery, or too thin. A good frittata should have lots of flavor and a nice moist texture that’s not too eggy. Here are a few tips on how to achieve this (or skip to the recipe below);

  • Use 8 eggs and a 10-inch skillet. This gives just the right thickness of frittata.
  • Use whole or 2% milk. The dairy fat helps to achieve the desired texture.
  • Use cheese. The combination of feta and Parmesan adds just the right savory nuance to the flavor.
Frittata recipe
The thickness is deliciously substantial

Why this frittata recipe is the best

Why is this frittata recipe better than others on the internet? Well, we’re a little biased (obviously). But this is the best one we’ve tasted. Here’s why:

  • It’s got just the right thickness and texture. Many recipes come out very thin or rubbery. This one has just the right texture.
  • The spinach feta filling is perfectly salted, savory and delicious. You can make it with lots of different fillings, but try the one in the recipe below. It’s a knock out!

Frittata filling ideas

The filling in this frittata recipe is spinach and feta: our ideal filling that we make again and again! Why? It’s easy, and only requires 2 to 3 minutes of sautéing the spinach before assembling the frittata. But if you want to get fancy, there are so many different combinations! Here’s what to know about filling:

  • Chop and sauté the vegetables first. The veggies will not cook inside the frittata: so make sure to give them a good sauté before assembling. Make sure the pieces are bite sized and not too large.
  • Herbs can be used fresh. A nice sprinkling of chopped basil, oregano, thyme, or dill doesn’t need any heat.

Some creative filling combinations to get you started:

How to make a frittata

Find the right frittata pan

The only equipment you’ll need to make a frittata recipe? The right pan. Here’s what you’ll need:

  • 10-inch seasoned cast-iron skillet. Make sure that it’s well-seasoned to break it in before making this recipe (otherwise it will stick).
  • Or, a 10-inch oven-safe skillet. You’ll cook on the stovetop first, then place it in the oven to finish cooking. Speaking of…

Start on the stovetop, finish in the oven

The key to a frittata recipe is watching it closely during the cooking! You’ll cook it in two parts: first the stovetop, then the oven. Here’s what to look out for:

  • Cook on the stovetop until the top is set and the bottom is lightly browned. Don’t overcook, or it will get too browned in the oven! We like to use a spatula to pull back the sides and check to see if it’s firming up.
  • Bake 10 to 12 minutes, until the top solidifies. You’ll want it to just harden into a solid texture on the top.
Frittata recipe

What to serve with a frittata

Let’s say you’re making this frittata recipe for dinner. What to serve with it? It’s easy to think about breakfast or brunch side dishes (hash browns, biscuits, etc). But what about dinner sides? Here’s what we like to pair:

More tasty egg recipes

More to do with eggs? We’re egg-sperts (sorry!) with using this ingredient to whip up meals. Here are some favorite egg recipes for dinner…and for eggs for breakfast:

This frittata recipe is…

Vegetarian and gluten-free.

Print
Frittata

Easy Frittata Recipe


  • Author: Sonja Overhiser
  • Prep Time: 5 minutes
  • Cook Time: 25 minutes
  • Total Time: 30 minutes
  • Yield: 8
  • Diet: Vegetarian

Description

Here’s how to make a frittata recipe: an easy breakfast, lunch or dinner! This basic filling idea is fast and tasty, or any veggies you have on hand.


Ingredients

  • 8 large eggs
  • ¼ cup milk (whole or 2%)
  • ½ teaspoon dried oregano
  • ½ teaspoon kosher salt
  • ¼ cup shredded Parmesan cheese
  • ½ cup feta crumbles, plus more for sprinkling*
  • 1 tablespoon olive oil
  • 5 ounces (about 6 cups) packed spinach leaves
  • ¼ teaspoon garlic powder
  • Fresh ground black pepper
  • Optional: fresh basil leaves, for the garnish

Instructions

  1. Preheat oven to 400°F.

  2. In a medium bowl, whisk together eggs, milk, oregano, kosher salt, and fresh ground pepper. Whisk in the Parmesan and feta cheese.

  3. In a 10-inch oven-safe skillet, heat the olive oil over medium heat. Sauté the spinach leaves, stirring until wilted, 2 to 3 minutes, spreading it around as you cook so that you spread oil up the sides of the pan. Add the garlic powder and 2 pinches kosher salt and sauté for another minute.

  4. Pour the egg mixture into the skillet. If necessary, use a fork to rearrange the spinach in an even layer so you can see if on the top. Sprinkle the top with a little more feta cheese. Cook for about 5 to 7 minutes over medium heat until the bottom is set and lightly browned, checking for doneness by pulling back the side with a spatula.

  5. Place the skillet in the oven and bake 10 to 12 minutes until the top is puffed, set, and slightly browned. Let rest for 10 minutes, then cut into wedges and serve warm, with sour cream or crème fraiche if desired. Leftovers save well: refrigerate for up to 5 days and serve them cold, room temperature, or warmed.

Notes

*Or use goat cheese crumbles or mozzarella cheese and add one more pinch of salt. 

  • Category: Main Dish
  • Method: Baked
  • Cuisine: Italian

Keywords: Frittata, Frittata recipe, How to make a frittata

A Couple Cooks - Recipes worth repeating.

Top 10 Cheese Shops in Paris

It’s been a while, but Paris is opening up to visitors again on June 9th! I wrote about some of the details in my recent newsletter (and some tips you might want to know if you plan to come) but although some food shops in Paris have been doing brisk business with the locals, many are happy to have visitors back. And not just for…

It’s been a while, but Paris is opening up to visitors again on June 9th! I wrote about some of the details in my recent newsletter (and some tips you might want to know if you plan to come) but although some food shops in Paris have been doing brisk business with the locals, many are happy to have visitors back. And not just for economic reasons; many shopkeepers like the mix of people who come into their shops and many foreigners are genuinely curious and want to learn more about the foods of France, and owners of small shops are usually happy to engage with them as they are proud of what they carry, especially in the better cheese shops, or fromageries.

Jennifer Greco is a life-long Francophile and French food and wine enthusiast with an especially strong passion for French cheese. After moving from the U.S. to the south of France almost two decades ago, she has steadily been tasting her way through each and every cheese produced in France, a project that started one day on a whim and has developed into a full-fledged infatuation. To date, she says she has tasted just under 400 of the approximately 1500 fromages made in France. (Charles de Gaulle underestimated his cheese-making compatriots when he said “How can you govern a country which has 246 types of cheese?”) 

Continue Reading Top 10 Cheese Shops in Paris...