Tapisserie

Years ago, at a flea market in Paris I pickup up some old metal letters from a bakery in France that spelled out PATISSERIE. Being a baker, of course I was thrilled (although still despondent that someone else snatched up the matching BOULANGERIE letters…) and proudly displayed them on the shelf of my apartment. Since my apartment at the time was so small, shelf space…

Years ago, at a flea market in Paris I pickup up some old metal letters from a bakery in France that spelled out PATISSERIE. Being a baker, of course I was thrilled (although still despondent that someone else snatched up the matching BOULANGERIE letters…) and proudly displayed them on the shelf of my apartment. Since my apartment at the time was so small, shelf space was at a super-premium. Yet I was happy to give a lot of it up to have those letters reminding me of my métier.

When I lent my apartment to some visiting friends, I noticed the P and the T had been reversed, and it spelled TAPISSERIE. I got a kick out of it and thought that was very clever. When a new bakery in Paris called Tapisserie from the team of a noted restaurant, I figured it wasn’t a place to purchase a tapestry, but a clever – and original – place to get terrific desserts.

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Blacker Berry Galette

My Netflix queue has gotten out of control and is entirely too long. And to make matters worse, I keep adding to it. Being out of the U.S. for so long, I missed watching binge-worthy, must-watch classics like The Wire and Breaking Bad when they came out, and I’d love to sit down on the sofa for another few months and watch them now that…

My Netflix queue has gotten out of control and is entirely too long. And to make matters worse, I keep adding to it. Being out of the U.S. for so long, I missed watching binge-worthy, must-watch classics like The Wire and Breaking Bad when they came out, and I’d love to sit down on the sofa for another few months and watch them now that they are streaming, as well as rewatch all five seasons of Six Feet Under, which was one of the best shows that’s even been on television. How they managed to make a show about death so human is beyond me, with a finale that’s lauded as the best ending for a television series ever. Which also made me wonder how they could have left the end of The Sopranos, another incredible show, land with such a thud?

The pandemic and confinements were certainly good for whittling down those “Watch Lists” but one show that jumped to the top of the queue was High on the Hog. It’s an eye-opening, unnerving, and emotionally difficult look at the role that African-Americans, who were brought to America as slaves, had in shaping American cooking. The subtitle of the show is “How African-American Cuisine Transformed America” which sounds like a big bill for fill, but the four-episode show traces how that happened.

And lest anyone doubt the rich contribution African-Americans have made to our cooking, author and Cook’s Country editor Toni Tipton-Martin pointed out in the program that Black Americans have been used by food brands for decades in America to denote quality, by brands like Aunt Jemima and Uncle Ben, which gave host Stephen Satterfield pause as well, flipping the narrative about those culinary characters (or caricatures) that many of us grew up with.

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Real Deal Cherry Pie

I had the good fortune of a day off right at the beginning of sour cherry s…

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I had the good fortune of a day off right at the beginning of sour cherry season last week (What, you don’t mark the weeks of summer using hyper-seasonal fruit as a guide? Just me?) so I put on some sunscreen and a hat, hopped in the car, and went in search of a u-pick farm. I was not disappointed to find a row of trees, heavy with fruit and not a soul in site at a farm a few hours from Brooklyn. It was a hot, hot day and the scent of the last strawberries in the field nearby filled the air as I filled up my bucket with precious sour cherries. 

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When I got home with my bounty, pie was the only choice. Instead of a traditional round, I went slab style and baked it in a quarter sheet pan. If you don’t have a quarter sheet pan or two, I highly recommend picking one up. At roughly 9x13x1, they are the perfect size to bake focaccia, a few cookies, toast nuts, or roast just about anything…but back to the sour cherries.

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Pitting cherries can be kind of a pain, but since sour cherries are so soft, I usually skip the pitter and just use my thumb to ease out the pits. It’s a bit of a sticky, drippy process so you can move your operation to the sink to make clean up super easy.

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I like my fruit pie fillings pretty simple, especially when the fruit is so special (and hard earned). This one is just sweet enough to highlight the cherries without totally overtaking their tart bite. I also added a bit of vanilla bean paste to round out the flavor, but a little bit of extract will do the trick too.

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The all butter pie crust has a bit of rye flour and brown sugar for toasty depth that is delicious with just about any fruit if sour cherries aren’t available where you live. It might be a little intimidating to roll out such a big piece of dough, but don’t you worry. To add both flakiness and structure to the dough, this recipe calls for a series of folds. The folds will make the dough both exceptionally delicious and easier to roll out and move around. Win-win. Check out the gif above to see how it’s done.

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Don’t worry if your dough rips a bit when you roll it out though, you can always pinch it back together. If you have time, make your dough the say before you plan to use it. A long rest will hydrate the dough and make it easier to roll out.

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I realize, it is a little unfair to share this recipe because sour cherries can be hard to get your hands on, but you still have a few more weeks to seek them out. Frozen will work in a pinch too, or substitute an equal amount of your favorite summer fruit - you will need a little less sugar for sweeter fruit.

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Real Deal Cherry Pie

Makes one 1/4 sheet slab pie

This pie makes the best of one of summer’s most fleeting pleasures, sour cherries. They are only available for a few weeks in late June/early July, but they are worth the wait, and the trouble of pitting them. The crust uses a bit of rye flour which adds some nutty and creamy flavor to the crust, and pairs beautifully with fruit desserts. Use an equal amount of all purpose flour if you have rye flour on hand. This filling recipe was lightly adapted from Deb at Smitten Kitchen, who adapted from Martha Stewart, and loves sour cherries as much as I do. 

Rye Crust

340g/2 2/3 cups all purpose flour

170g/1 1/3 cups rye flour (I used Abruzzi Heirloom Rye from Anson Mills)

1 tablespoon brown sugar

1 teaspoon kosher salt

10-12 tablespoons ice water

1 tablespoon apple cider vinegar

340g/1 1/4 cups unsalted butter, cut into tablespoon sized pieces

Filling

900g/about 6 cups pitted sour cherries

3/4 cup + 1 tablespoon (165g) sugar (I used a natural cane sugar here, but granulated works too)

30g/1/4 cup cornstarch

Juice of 1/2 lemon

1 tablespoon vanilla bean paste

Pinch salt

 To finish

1 egg, for egg wash

Turbinado sugar to finish

To make the crust: Add the flours, brown sugar, and salt to a large bowl. Stir them together until combined. Add the apple cider vinegar to the ice water. Working quickly, add the butter to the flour and toss to coat. Then use your fingers or the palms of your hands to press each cube of butter into a flat sheet. Keep tossing the butter as you go to ensure that each butter piece is coated with flour. The idea is to create thin, flat shards of butter that range from about the size of a dime to about the size of a quarter. Sprinkle about 6 tablespoons of the water over the flour mixture and use your hands to mix gently, making sure to get all of the way down to the bottom of the bowl. Continue to add more water a couple of teaspoons at a time. 

You have added enough water when you can pick up a handful of the dough and squeeze it together easily without it falling apart. 

Press the dough together, then pat it into a rectangle. Fold the dough into thirds like a letter, then split it in half, form each half into a rectangle and wrap each piece in plastic wrap. Chill the dough for at least one hour before using, or overnight. I prefer an overnight rest if possible.

When you are ready to bake the pie, heat your oven to 400ºF.

Add the pitted cherries, sugar, cornstarch, lemon juice, vanilla bean paste, and salt to a large bowl and stir gently to combine.

Roll one piece of the dough on a lightly floured surface into a rectangle about 11x15. Gently tuck it into a metal quarter sheet pan, letting the excess hang over the sides. Roll the other piece of dough into a rectangle about 10x14. 

Pour the cherries into the dough lined pan and top with other piece of dough. Gently fold the bottom dough up and over the top and press gently. Refrigerate the pie until the crust is firm, about 15 minutes.

While the pie chills, beat the egg with a few drops of water to make the egg wash. When the pie is nice and chilled gently brush the surface with egg wash and sprinkle with turbinado sugar. Cut a few vents in the top then bake until the crust is deep golden brown and the juices are bubbling, 45-60 minutes.

Let the pie cool on a rack before serving warm or at room temperature. Ice cream is optional, but highly suggested.

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Marche des Producteurs de Pays

This week France rather quietly announced that visitors from the U.S. and Canada were allowed to come to the country without any restrictions. Things are still moving in the direction of getting back to normal, and while last year is still sort of a haze to me, I believe the markets in Paris remained open the entire time, operating under different conditions. Outdoor markets are…

This week France rather quietly announced that visitors from the U.S. and Canada were allowed to come to the country without any restrictions. Things are still moving in the direction of getting back to normal, and while last year is still sort of a haze to me, I believe the markets in Paris remained open the entire time, operating under different conditions. Outdoor markets are extremely important in France and, of course, pre-dated les supermarchés which are now everywhere and have more agreeable hours – some are now even open on Sundays, which was controversial when it happened. But the outdoor markets take place six days a week in Paris, and in a country where holidays and vacations, and Sundays, are sacred, they remain open no matter what, even on Christmas, Easter, and New Year’s Day.

The outdoor markets are an integral part of French life and while in Paris there are over 100 marchés alimentaires (food markets), many of the stands are run by négotiants, or middle-men and women, who get their fruits, vegetables, meats, poultry, and fish from Rungis, the wholesale market outside of the city. There are many small farms in France but many stay, and sell, only in their regions due to their size. So I’m always happy when I see signs posted about an upcoming Marché des Producteurs de Pays, where you can buy things directly from the growers and producers, who bring their foods to the city.

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Cherry Crisp

Cherry Crisp is simple, quick, and delicious. Top it with a scoop of vanilla ice cream for the ultimate weeknight dessert. Last week I was tidying up our pantry and realized that I haven’t used my ice cream maker in quite some time. So I pulled it forward on the shelf, gave it a good …

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Cherry Crisp is simple, quick, and delicious. Top it with a scoop of vanilla ice cream for the ultimate weeknight dessert.

Last week I was tidying up our pantry and realized that I haven’t used my ice cream maker in quite some time. So I pulled it forward on the shelf, gave it a good wipe down and decided that I need to teach my girl how to make some homemade ice cream.

I scanned the fridge and pantry to see if we had everything on hand to whip up a simple vanilla ice cream base, but it was a no-go because I had used the rest of the cream for a delish Alfredo sauce last week.

So I totally switched gears and decided I was in the mood for a crisp – cherry crisp to be exact.

And I just so happened to have all of those ingredients on hand – complete with a pint of vanilla bean ice cream in the freezer.

No worries though, we’ll get to the homemade vanilla ice cream as soon as I pick up some more heavy cream on our next grocery trip.

(more…)

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Secret Ingredient Cherry Almond Smoothie

This rich and creamy smoothie has a natural and subtle sweetness, a creamy texture, and tons of protein and plant fiber to keep you full.

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I’ve been playing around with riced cauliflower over the past week, and one of the fun and unexpected ways to use it is in fruit smoothies, like this Cherry Almond Smoothie. This rich and creamy smoothie has a natural and subtle sweetness, a creamy texture, and tons of protein and plant fiber to keep you full. So if hiding cauliflower in a fruit smoothie has you curious, keep on reading!

Cherry almond smoothie in a short glass with bananas and a bowl of frozen cherries behind it

Why Add Cauliflower to a Smoothie?

Cauliflower is a really great neutral ingredient that adds fiber and body to the smoothie, which helps give it a lighter, more creamy texture. Plus, it’s a really simple way to add an extra dose of vegetables to your day.

I used frozen riced cauliflower to my smoothie, but if you have a really good blender you can use frozen cauliflower florets as well.

How Does it Taste?

You can’t taste the cauliflower in this smoothie. Not only is cauliflower mild in flavor already, but I find that ingredients that have a bit of fat (like the almond butter in this recipe) help mask that cruciferous vegetable flavor.

This smoothie has a subtle, natural sweetness, thanks to the banana and cherries. If you prefer a sweeter smoothie, you can add some honey, brown sugar, another sweet fruit like blueberries, or use sweetened almond milk.

Can I Sub the Almond Butter or Almond Milk?

If you can’t eat almonds, another good option is to make this a cherry coconut smoothie. In place of using almond butter and almond milk, you can use some full-fat coconut milk. The creamy coconut flavor will offer that same richness as the almond butter and help hide that cruciferous flavor.

A glass filled with a cherry almond smoothie with bananas and a bowl of frozen cherries in the back
A glass filled with a cherry almond smoothie, with bananas and a bowl of frozen cherries in the back

Cherry Almond Smoothie

This rich and creamy smoothie has a natural and subtle sweetness, a creamy texture, and tons of protein and plant fiber to keep you full.
Total Cost $1.69 each
Prep Time 5 minutes
Total Time 5 minutes
Servings 1 (12 oz.)
Calories 254.7kcal
Author Beth – Budget Bytes

Equipment

Ingredients

Instructions

  • Add all of the ingredients to a blender and blend until smooth. Adjust the liquid as needed to make it blend smoothly. Serve immediately.

Notes

*I used plain, unsweetened almond milk, but you can use sweetened if you prefer a sweeter smoothie. Vanilla flavored almond milk will also work well. 

Nutrition

Serving: 1smoothie | Calories: 254.7kcal | Carbohydrates: 35.8g | Protein: 6.7g | Fat: 11.6g | Sodium: 229.5mg | Fiber: 6.8g

How to Make a Cherry Almond Smoothie – Step by Step Photos

smoothie ingredients in a blender, almond milk being poured in

Add ½ cup frozen riced cauliflower, ½ of a frozen banana, ½ cup frozen sweet cherries, 1 Tbsp almond butter, ⅛ tsp cinnamon, and 1 cup almond milk to a blender.

Looking down into a blender with a blended cherry almond smoothie

Blend the ingredients until smooth. Sometimes with smoothies you may need to adjust the liquid up or down to make it blend smoothly. Taste the smoothie and adjust the sweetness (honey, sugar, more fruit) to your liking. Serve immediately.

A glass filled with a cherry almond smoothie, with bananas and a bowl of frozen cherries in the back

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Brussels Sprout Salad

This Brussels sprout salad recipe has the best fresh flavor and zingy dressing! Pair with apple, almonds and cherries for a simple side dish. Brussels sprouts in a salad? Turns out, the mighty sprout is one of the best ways to make delicious, feathery salad greens. Sure, Brussels sprouts are transcendental crispy roasted with maple glaze. But shaved raw in a salad is the next best way to eat them! The raw greens aren’t bitter at all: they’re sweet and feathery, with irresistibly tasty flavor. Combine them with a sweet and tangy Djion mustard dressing, apples, and dried cherries, and they’re pretty darn perfect. Ready to get shredding? Ingredients for Brussels sprout salad There are so many ways to make a killer Brussels sprout salad recipe: here’s our favorite — and we’ll offer some variations and options below. Here’s what we put in our salad: Shaved Brussels sprouts: see below for how to do it, or buy them pre-shaved Crunchy leafy green: we used escarole, but it’s optional Apple: Apple and Brussels are a classic combination Dried cherries: Use tart cherries with no added sugar if you can find them Almonds: Marcona almonds have great flavor, or use whatever you […]

A Couple Cooks – Healthy, Whole Food, & Vegetarian Recipes

This Brussels sprout salad recipe has the best fresh flavor and zingy dressing! Pair with apple, almonds and cherries for a simple side dish.

Brussels sprout salad

Brussels sprouts in a salad? Turns out, the mighty sprout is one of the best ways to make delicious, feathery salad greens. Sure, Brussels sprouts are transcendental crispy roasted with maple glaze. But shaved raw in a salad is the next best way to eat them! The raw greens aren’t bitter at all: they’re sweet and feathery, with irresistibly tasty flavor. Combine them with a sweet and tangy Djion mustard dressing, apples, and dried cherries, and they’re pretty darn perfect. Ready to get shredding?

Ingredients for Brussels sprout salad

There are so many ways to make a killer Brussels sprout salad recipe: here’s our favorite — and we’ll offer some variations and options below. Here’s what we put in our salad:

  • Shaved Brussels sprouts: see below for how to do it, or buy them pre-shaved
  • Crunchy leafy green: we used escarole, but it’s optional
  • Apple: Apple and Brussels are a classic combination
  • Dried cherries: Use tart cherries with no added sugar if you can find them
  • Almonds: Marcona almonds have great flavor, or use whatever you can find
  • Feta crumbles, optional: Feta is tasty, but this salad is just as good without
  • Dijon dressing: Top with our favorite Dijon mustard dressing for all the goodness
Brussels sprout salad

How to shred Brussels sprouts

The most time consuming part of Brussels sprout salad is…shaving the Brussels sprouts! There are a few ways to do it: and all you need is a Chef’s knife. However, if you have fancy equipment, it makes the process much faster. Here’s what to know:

  • Knife: Remove any tough outer layers with your fingers. Cut the Brussels sprout in half lengthwise. Place the cut side down and thinly slide cross-wise to create shreds. Separate the shreds with your fingers. Discard the root end.
  • Food processor: Use the slicing disc of a food processor. Place the Brussels sprout in top down one at a time, which creates long thin ribbons.
  • Mandoline: Put on the protective gloves that came with the mandoline. Shave each sprout from the tip to the end, using the mandoline attachment.
How to shred Brussels sprouts

Variations: other salad mix-ins!

Shaved Brussels sprouts aren’t bitter as you’d expect. They have a sweet flavor and a beautifully feathery texture. You can add just about anything to your Brussels sprout salad and it will taste good! Here are a few more ideas for mix-ins:

  • Pomegranate seeds add a beautiful crunch (here’s how to seed one)
  • Dried fruit like cranberries or raisins can stand in for the cherries
  • Pear can stand in for apple
  • Walnuts, pecans or pistachios work instead of almonds
  • Pumpkin seeds add additional crunch
  • Parmesan or Pecorino Romano cheese adds a savory note instead of feta

Salad dressing variations

You can also vary the dressing in this salad! We love it with our Dijon mustard dressing. But there are a few other dressing that work based on the ingredients you have on hand. Here are a few other options:

Another idea? Try tossing this salad with a sticky reduction sauce after the dressing, like Balsamic Reduction or Pomegranate Molasses.

Brussels sprout salad recipe

More Brussels sprouts recipes

The humble Brussels sprout has grown into one of our favorite foods. In the last several years, it’s grown massively in popularity on restaurant menus. We’re so glad it’s enjoying the spotlight it deserves! Here are a few more great Brussels sprout recipes:

This Brussels sprout salad recipe is…

Vegetarian, vegan, plant-based, diary-free and gluten-free.

Print
Brussels sprout salad

Easy Brussels Sprout Salad


1 Star2 Stars3 Stars4 Stars5 Stars (5 votes, average: 5.00 out of 5)

  • Author: Sonja Overhiser
  • Prep Time: 20 minutes
  • Cook Time: 0 minutes
  • Total Time: 20 minutes
  • Yield: 4
  • Diet: Vegan

Description

This Brussels sprout salad has the best fresh flavors and zingy dressing! Pair it with apples, almonds and dried cherries for a tasty side.


Ingredients

For the salad

  • 1 pound Brussels sprouts, enough for 4 cups shredded (or 8 ounces shredded) 
  • 1 1/2 cups chopped escarole or other crunchy leafy green, optional
  • 1 large crisp tart red apple (like Honeycrisp)
  • 1/2 cup dried tart cherries
  • 1/2 cup almonds (Marcona almonds, if possible)
  • 1/4 teaspoon kosher salt
  • 1 recipe Dijon Mustard Dressing
  • Feta cheese crumbles, optional (omit for vegan)

Instructions

  1. Shred the Brussels sprouts: go to How to Shred Brussels Sprouts. Or, use a food processor slicing blade or mandoline to slice each sprout from top to end. 
  2. Prep the vegetables: Chop the escarole or other leafy green. Dice the apple. 
  3. Make the dressing: In a medium bowl, whisk together the Dijon mustard, white wine vinegar, maple syrup, and salt. Then whisk in the olive oil 1 tablespoon at a time until a creamy dressing forms. 
  4. Assemble the salad: Mix together all salad ingredients. Mix with 1/2 cup of the dressing (add more to taste, if desired). Top with feta crumbles, if using, and serve. 
  • Category: Side
  • Method: Raw
  • Cuisine: Salad

Keywords: Brussels sprout salad

A Couple Cooks - Healthy, Whole Food, & Vegetarian Recipes

Black Fruitcake

Over the last several years, people suggested that I write a book of fruit desserts. I point out, helpfully, that I already have, but every year a few books of fruit desserts come out, mostly relating to pies or crisps and cobblers. So it was interesting to see one devoted solely to cakes, called (appropriately) Fruit Cake: Recipes for the Curious Baker. But no need…

Over the last several years, people suggested that I write a book of fruit desserts. I point out, helpfully, that I already have, but every year a few books of fruit desserts come out, mostly relating to pies or crisps and cobblers. So it was interesting to see one devoted solely to cakes, called (appropriately) Fruit Cake: Recipes for the Curious Baker.

But no need to worry that it’s a book of Christmas cakes with sticky green cherries in them. It’s by Jason Schreiber, a food stylist and recipe developer, who dreamed up with seventy-five cakes that feature fruit, everything from Key Lime Meringue Cake to a tropical fruit Panettone. There are also Pineapple Breakfast Cakes, his riff on the classic Sachertorte with chocolate and apricots, and a Jamaican Black Cake, that caught my eye for a number of reasons.

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Coup de Roulis cocktail

This rosy coup holds a drink from Cocktails de Paris, a book of cocktail recipes from Paris, published in 1929. (It’s available to download* for free here.) I was attracted to it because it called for Cherry Rocher, a French liqueur produced by a distillery that was founded in 1704 and is still making it today. Coup de roulis translates to “strong blow,” referring to…

This rosy coup holds a drink from Cocktails de Paris, a book of cocktail recipes from Paris, published in 1929. (It’s available to download* for free here.) I was attracted to it because it called for Cherry Rocher, a French liqueur produced by a distillery that was founded in 1704 and is still making it today. Coup de roulis translates to “strong blow,” referring to the strong sway or roll of a boat. My guess is that maybe it got its name because it has four different spirits in it? No matter, I needed a strong drink last week when my apartment sprung a fuite d’eau, causing a flood.

The Paris cocktail book is an excursion back in time, as was the leak, harkening back to other, um…issues I’ve had with my apartment. In the pages, there are words used, such as Angustura (with an alternative spelling that may be from days of yore) and ‘focking,’ a term I’d never heard of either, and when I searched Google for “cocktail focking,” let’s just say most of the search results were adult-only…and I don’t mean in the cocktail department.

Continue Reading Coup de Roulis cocktail...

Honeycrisp Quinoa Salad with Kale and Pistachios.

Nothing beats this honeycrisp quinoa salad on a Monday. And it’s no secret that I love a good september salad!  Because kale, honeycrisps, and anything else I can grab to celebrate the seasons – the end of summer and start of fall –  are perfect together in one big bowl.  Years ago I made this […]

The post Honeycrisp Quinoa Salad with Kale and Pistachios. appeared first on How Sweet Eats.

Nothing beats this honeycrisp quinoa salad on a Monday.

honeycrisp quinoa salad with kale and pistachios

And it’s no secret that I love a good september salad! 

kale with quinoa and pistachios

Because kale, honeycrisps, and anything else I can grab to celebrate the seasons – the end of summer and start of fall –  are perfect together in one big bowl. 

chopped apples and feta

Years ago I made this harvest honey crisp salad. The cinnamon shallot vinaigrette is the star of the show in this one! And, the double nuts. 

Then, I made a september kale salad, with figs and apples and pancetta and goat cheese. All sounds incredible right? That’s topped off with a maple cider vinaigrette and it deeeelish.

See? I’m just a little into september salads…

honeycrisp quinoa salad with kale and pistachios

For today’s salad, I’m keeping the kale and honeycrisps, but adding in some quinoa for satiety, some feta cubes, pistachios for savory, buttery crunch and dried tart cherries. 

Oh my word. This is heaven. It has EVERYTHING.

And then! It’s all drizzled with an apple cider vinaigrette. If you love a salty+sweet combo, you will adore this. It’s amazing. 

Give me all the apple cider things!

apple cider dressing

The base is tuscan kale, which is my absolute favorite for salads. You can use curly green too, of course. When the kale is massaged (yes, it’s massaged!) with the dressing, it becomes tender and chewy, in a really good way. 

Then we have the crunch from the nuts. The big juicy chunks of apple. The feta cubes which are tangy and cheesy and lovely. Then sweet chewiness from the cherries.

honeycrisp quinoa salad with kale and pistachios

A salad like this is the perfect way to transition from summer to fall. It’s refreshing enough to hit the spot on warm late summer nights, but adds enough flavor to get you excited for autumn produce. 

Let it be dinner tonight!

honeycrisp quinoa salad with kale and pistachios

Honeycrisp Quinoa Salad with Kale and Pistachios

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Honeycrisp Quinoa Salad with Kale and Pistachios

This honeycrisp quinoa salad is made with kale, feta, pistachios, dried cherries and an incredible apple cider vinaigrette.
Course Salad
Cuisine American
Prep Time 30 minutes
Total Time 30 minutes
Servings 4 people
Author How Sweet Eats

Ingredients

  • ½ cup cooked quinoa
  • 1 large bunch lacinato kale, leaves removed from stems (you want 4 to 6 cups)
  • 2 honey crisp apples cubed
  • 6 ounces feta cheese cubed
  • cup dried tart cherries
  • ¼ cup chopped roasted pistachios

apple cider vinaigrette

  • cup apple cider
  • 1 tablespoon freshly squeezed lemon juice
  • 1 garlic clove, finely minced or pressed
  • pinch of salt and pepper
  • pinch of freshly ground nutmeg
  • 1/2 cup extra virgin olive oil

Instructions

  • This is a great dish to use up leftover quinoa, but if you don’t have it made, start with that! Make a batch of quinoa first and while it cooks (it will take about 15 minutes), chop your other ingredients.
  • Chop the kale and place it in a bowl. Drizzle it with about 2 tablespoons of the apple cider vinaigrette and massage the kale with your hands for 1 to 2 minutes. Let it sit for at least 5 minutes.
  • If you are using just-cooked quinoa (so it's warm), you can put it over the kale to wilt it a bit. If it's cold or room temp, that is fine too. Once the kale has rested, add in the quinoa, apples, feta, pistachios and cherries. Toss well and drizzle on more of the dressing. Serve!
  • This salad stays surprisingly well overnight - the apples may slightly brown a bit, but if you seal it in a container, the leftovers are great.

apple cider vinaigrette

  • Whisk together the apple cider, lemon juice, garlic, salt, pepper and nutmeg. Whisk constantly while streaming in the olive oil. This dressing stays great sealed in the fridge for a few days.

honeycrisp quinoa salad with kale and pistachios

Bite of perfection, right there!

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