Coup de Roulis cocktail

This rosy coup holds a drink from Cocktails de Paris, a book of cocktail recipes from Paris, published in 1929. (It’s available to download* for free here.) I was attracted to it because it called for Cherry Rocher, a French liqueur produced by a distillery that was founded in 1704 and is still making it today. Coup de roulis translates to “strong blow,” referring to…

This rosy coup holds a drink from Cocktails de Paris, a book of cocktail recipes from Paris, published in 1929. (It’s available to download* for free here.) I was attracted to it because it called for Cherry Rocher, a French liqueur produced by a distillery that was founded in 1704 and is still making it today. Coup de roulis translates to “strong blow,” referring to the strong sway or roll of a boat. My guess is that maybe it got its name because it has four different spirits in it? No matter, I needed a strong drink last week when my apartment sprung a fuite d’eau, causing a flood.

The Paris cocktail book is an excursion back in time, as was the leak, harkening back to other, um…issues I’ve had with my apartment. In the pages, there are words used, such as Angustura (with an alternative spelling that may be from days of yore) and ‘focking,’ a term I’d never heard of either, and when I searched Google for “cocktail focking,” let’s just say most of the search results were adult-only…and I don’t mean in the cocktail department.

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Honeycrisp Quinoa Salad with Kale and Pistachios.

Nothing beats this honeycrisp quinoa salad on a Monday. And it’s no secret that I love a good september salad!  Because kale, honeycrisps, and anything else I can grab to celebrate the seasons – the end of summer and start of fall –  are perfect together in one big bowl.  Years ago I made this […]

The post Honeycrisp Quinoa Salad with Kale and Pistachios. appeared first on How Sweet Eats.

Nothing beats this honeycrisp quinoa salad on a Monday.

honeycrisp quinoa salad with kale and pistachios

And it’s no secret that I love a good september salad! 

kale with quinoa and pistachios

Because kale, honeycrisps, and anything else I can grab to celebrate the seasons – the end of summer and start of fall –  are perfect together in one big bowl. 

chopped apples and feta

Years ago I made this harvest honey crisp salad. The cinnamon shallot vinaigrette is the star of the show in this one! And, the double nuts. 

Then, I made a september kale salad, with figs and apples and pancetta and goat cheese. All sounds incredible right? That’s topped off with a maple cider vinaigrette and it deeeelish.

See? I’m just a little into september salads…

honeycrisp quinoa salad with kale and pistachios

For today’s salad, I’m keeping the kale and honeycrisps, but adding in some quinoa for satiety, some feta cubes, pistachios for savory, buttery crunch and dried tart cherries. 

Oh my word. This is heaven. It has EVERYTHING.

And then! It’s all drizzled with an apple cider vinaigrette. If you love a salty+sweet combo, you will adore this. It’s amazing. 

Give me all the apple cider things!

apple cider dressing

The base is tuscan kale, which is my absolute favorite for salads. You can use curly green too, of course. When the kale is massaged (yes, it’s massaged!) with the dressing, it becomes tender and chewy, in a really good way. 

Then we have the crunch from the nuts. The big juicy chunks of apple. The feta cubes which are tangy and cheesy and lovely. Then sweet chewiness from the cherries.

honeycrisp quinoa salad with kale and pistachios

A salad like this is the perfect way to transition from summer to fall. It’s refreshing enough to hit the spot on warm late summer nights, but adds enough flavor to get you excited for autumn produce. 

Let it be dinner tonight!

honeycrisp quinoa salad with kale and pistachios

Honeycrisp Quinoa Salad with Kale and Pistachios

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Honeycrisp Quinoa Salad with Kale and Pistachios

This honeycrisp quinoa salad is made with kale, feta, pistachios, dried cherries and an incredible apple cider vinaigrette.
Course Salad
Cuisine American
Prep Time 30 minutes
Total Time 30 minutes
Servings 4 people
Author How Sweet Eats

Ingredients

  • ½ cup cooked quinoa
  • 1 large bunch lacinato kale, leaves removed from stems (you want 4 to 6 cups)
  • 2 honey crisp apples cubed
  • 6 ounces feta cheese cubed
  • cup dried tart cherries
  • ¼ cup chopped roasted pistachios

apple cider vinaigrette

  • cup apple cider
  • 1 tablespoon freshly squeezed lemon juice
  • 1 garlic clove, finely minced or pressed
  • pinch of salt and pepper
  • pinch of freshly ground nutmeg
  • 1/2 cup extra virgin olive oil

Instructions

  • This is a great dish to use up leftover quinoa, but if you don’t have it made, start with that! Make a batch of quinoa first and while it cooks (it will take about 15 minutes), chop your other ingredients.
  • Chop the kale and place it in a bowl. Drizzle it with about 2 tablespoons of the apple cider vinaigrette and massage the kale with your hands for 1 to 2 minutes. Let it sit for at least 5 minutes.
  • If you are using just-cooked quinoa (so it's warm), you can put it over the kale to wilt it a bit. If it's cold or room temp, that is fine too. Once the kale has rested, add in the quinoa, apples, feta, pistachios and cherries. Toss well and drizzle on more of the dressing. Serve!
  • This salad stays surprisingly well overnight - the apples may slightly brown a bit, but if you seal it in a container, the leftovers are great.

apple cider vinaigrette

  • Whisk together the apple cider, lemon juice, garlic, salt, pepper and nutmeg. Whisk constantly while streaming in the olive oil. This dressing stays great sealed in the fridge for a few days.

honeycrisp quinoa salad with kale and pistachios

Bite of perfection, right there!

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Summer Fruit Recipes

It’s summer! Whether you’re in or outdoors, hopefully for all of you there are beautiful summer fruits and berries to be had, and I hope that you’re able to get your hands on as many of them as you can. I am loading (actually, overloading…) myself up at the market. While a good portion on the fresh fruit gets eaten just as-is, some of it…

It’s summer! Whether you’re in or outdoors, hopefully for all of you there are beautiful summer fruits and berries to be had, and I hope that you’re able to get your hands on as many of them as you can. I am loading (actually, overloading…) myself up at the market. While a good portion on the fresh fruit gets eaten just as-is, some of it goes into the following dessert recipes that I continue to make year after year. Others go into jam, which is a great way to preserve all those summer fruits and berries, and make them last through fall and winter.

Cherry season is behind most of us (sniff…sniff…), but if they are still lingering where you live, you can type “cherry” or “cherries” into the search engine at the top right corner of the page to find cherry recipes. (And we don’t get a bountiful array of fresh raspberries and blackberries here, so I don’t have many recipes that use them on the blog.) But for nectarines, strawberries, peaches, plums and other summer fruits, here are some of my favorite recipes on the blog…

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No Bake Oreo Cheesecake

No Bake Oreo Cheesecake combines pretty much all your favorite things in one place. Easy, a total crowd pleaser, and hello – Oreos!

The post No Bake Oreo Cheesecake appeared first on My Baking Addiction.

No Bake Oreo Cheesecake combines pretty much all your favorite things in one sweet, no-bake dessert. Easy, a total crowd pleaser, and hello – Oreos!

Slice of no bake oreo cheesecake topped with cherry pie filling on a white plate with a 2nd slice and a bowl of cherry pie filling in the background

I know this July 4th isn’t going to exactly look how any of us are used to.

With fewer fireworks, cookouts, and general merriment, we have to find ways to celebrate within our small groups. 

And you know if I need to celebrate, I’m reaching for one of my cheesecake recipes

You guys know that I have a pretty serious thing for cheesecake – especially when it requires minimal prep work and zero baking time. 

Add in an Oreo crust and I’ll fall hook, line and sinker every single time. 

(more…)

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Chocolate Chip “Kitchen Sink” Cookies

Being confined for two weeks has been, um, interesting. As someone who works at home, I was, like, “I got this…” But by day two I started getting loopy. As much as I think Romain is the greatest thing ever, it’s hard to be cooped up and not allowed to go out. True, we can go to the grocery store or bakery if we bring…

Being confined for two weeks has been, um, interesting. As someone who works at home, I was, like, “I got this…” But by day two I started getting loopy. As much as I think Romain is the greatest thing ever, it’s hard to be cooped up and not allowed to go out. True, we can go to the grocery store or bakery if we bring a signed attestation with us for each trip we make (good thing we keep plenty of paper on hand for printing and photocopying here all the paperwork) but I was surprised how much I missed the interactions of daily life, much more than I thought.

Today they suddenly closed one of my local bakeries because they didn’t have enough masks and other supplies to protect their employees and customers, and tears welled up when I talked to one of the owners, who I’ve known since they opened the place. I ran over to get a baguette and a loaf of bread. They’re not the only bakery in the neighborhood, but it was sad to see them go and I hope they can reopen.

I knew from living in earthquake country, when this started, to have extra provisions on hand, so I bought a few extra bags of non-perishables like sardines, tuna, canned tomatoes, and pasta sauce. I have tons of grains and pasta always on hand, but I wanted to make sure I had enough butter, eggs, and flour, which I usually keep well-stocked. But when I was at the grocery store last week and saw all those blocks of butter on the shelf, I thought, “Why not?”

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Recipe | Whole Wheat Chocolate Cherry Muffins

When I was little, I had a thing for chocolate-covered cherries. I’m not really sure how it started—no one in my family likes chocolate cherries, so I don’t know where I first had them. But man, did I love them. While my brothers would get …

When I was little, I had a thing for chocolate-covered cherries. I’m not really sure how it started—no one in my family likes chocolate cherries, so I don’t know where I first had them. But man, did I love them. While my brothers would get Sour Patch Kids or Razzles (remember Razzles?!) from the candy store, I’d go to the fancypants chocolate counter and get two or three chocolate cherries. Now that I’m older, I can’t stand those chocolate cherry cordials. They are waaaay too sweet for my tastes. But I still love that combination of chocolate and cherries—just not all the added sugar. Since I’m on a bit of a muffin kick lately, I thought I’d try making chocolate cherry muffins. I’ve had half a bag of dried cherries sitting in the pantry since October, so it was time to use them up! And I had all of the other ingredients on hand too, so these muffins were just meant to be. Unfortunately, I’m still learning when it comes to baking, and I burnt them. They weren’t so burnt that they were inedible, but they did end up being a little bit dry, especially on the bottom. I’ve adjusted […]

Cherry Lambic Brownies (Brownies Made With Beer!)

These are those kind of brownies. The kind of brownies where you eat one and swear off chocolate for the rest of the year and vow to eat salad (and salad alone!) for the next week. But then you sneak one for breakfast the next morning. And maybe one fo…

These are those kind of brownies. The kind of brownies where you eat one and swear off chocolate for the rest of the year and vow to eat salad (and salad alone!) for the next week. But then you sneak one for breakfast the next morning. And maybe one for lunch too. The kind of brownies that are so rich and fudgy, you have to eat them with a spoon. The kind of brownies that incite arguments over who gets the last one. (Yeah, that happened.) I realize that Cherry Lambic Brownies aren’t exactly why you read Oh My Veggies, but I had this idea floating around in my head ever since I made cupcakes with raspberry lambic earlier this year. I loved the hint of fruit the lambic added to those chocolate cupcakes and I wanted to experiment with using it in more baked goods. So I added “cherry lambic brownies” to my big list of recipes to make and it sat there for several months. I found myself putting off making them because rich, decadent desserts tend not to do well on my blog. However! I’m a big believer in the power of the daily occasional brownie. And […]

Any Fruit Galette

apricot and berry galette plum galette strawberry galettes cherry galette

Hello! This post is a little refresh of my very favorite recipe - Galettes! If you follow me on instagram you know that I am a galette evangelist. I think galettes are the very best and most fun dessert because they are so easy to make and adaptable, but my recipe was a little bit hidden in the archives so I am pulling it out into the spotlight with this easy to find post. You can use just about any fruit you like or a combination of fruits, and feel free to adjust the sugar to taste. Be free! Don’t worry about it too much! Have fun!

If you bake a galette make sure to tag me and #summerofgalettes on instagram and feel free to message me with any questions. I love seeing what you bake!

All Butter Pie Crust

All pie crust is made from the same basic ingredients: flour, fat, water, and salt. I am partial to an all-butter crust because I think it tastes the best. The key to flaky pie crust is to keep the ingredients nice and cold— especially the butter and water—and to work quickly and intentionally. I like to mix pie crust with my hands rather than a food processor or pastry blender because I can control the exact size and shape of the butter pieces for the flakiest results. Add a few teaspoons of sugar if you prefer a sweetened crust.

Ingredients

2 2⁄3 cups (340g) all purpose flour

1 teaspoon kosher salt

1 cup plus 2 tablespoons (255g) very cold unsalted butter

1 tablespoon apple cider vinegar

8-10 tablespoons (120ml) ice water

Whisk the flour and salt together in a large bowl, cut the butter into 1⁄2-inch cubes, and add the apple cider vinegar to the ice water.

Working quickly, add the butter to the flour and toss to coat. Then use your fingers or the palms of your hands to press each cube of butter into a flat sheet. Keep tossing the butter in the flour as you go to ensure that each butter piece is coated with flour. The idea is to create flat, thin shards of butter that range from about the size of a dime to about the size of a quarter. If at any time the butter seems warm or soft, briefly refrigerate the bowl.

Sprinkle about 6 tablespoons of the icy cold vinegar-water mixture over the flour mixture. Use a gentle hand or wooden spoon to stir the water into the flour until just combined. If the dough seems dry, add more cold water a couple of teaspoons at a time. You have added enough water when you can pick up a handful of the dough and easily squeeze it together without it falling apart.

Press the dough together, then split it in half. Form each half into a disk, and wrap each disk in plastic wrap. Chill the dough for at least 2 hours before using, but preferably overnight. Keeps for up to three months in the freezer wrapped in a double layer of plastic wrap and a layer of foil. Thaw in the refrigerator before using.

VARIATIONS: For a rye variation, substitute 11⁄3 cups (175g) rye flour for an equal amount of the all purpose flour. For a spelt variation, substitute 11⁄3 cups (175g) spelt flour for an equal amount of the all purpose flour. You also may need a bit more water to bind the dough for these variations.

Any Fruit Galette

Yield: One 8-inch galette

You can use this formula with just about any seasonal fruit. For apples, pears, and stone fruit peel if desired then slice into 1/4-1/3-inch slices. Apricots (my fave!) can be gently torn in half or cut into quarters. Slice strawberries in halves or quarters if they are large. Rhubarb can be sliced into thin batons or 1/2-inch chunks. Feel free to experiment with combining your favorite fruits. I love stone fruit and berries together in the summer. Also, the apricot jam can be replaced with any jam or marmalade you like that will compliment the fruit you are using.

1 disc pie crust

3/4 pound (340g) fresh fruit

1/4 cup apricot jam

1/4 cup (50g) granulated sugar, to taste

2 tablespoons flour

1/2 teaspoon lemon zest

seeds of one vanilla bean (optional)

pinch salt

1 egg, for egg wash

turbinado sugar and flaky salt for sprinkling

Arrange a rack in the oven in the lower third and preheat oven to 425ºF. Line a baking sheet with parchment paper.

Combine the sugar vanilla bean seeds, lemon zest, flour and salt in a bowl. Add the fruit to a large bowl and sprinkle the sugar mixture over the top, but don’t stir quite yet.

On a lightly floured surface roll the dough into a rough circle between 1/8-1/4-inch thick and transfer it to a parchment lined baking sheet. Gently stir the fruit mixture until well combined.

Spread the jam onto the center of the dough, then pour the fruit into the center of the galette. Press gently to compact the fruit into an even layer. Fold the edges of the dough up and over the fruit and press the folds gently to seal. Refrigerate the formed galettes until the dough is very firm.

Brush the galette with egg wash, sprinkle with turbinado sugar and flaky salt if desired and bake until deep golden brown and bubbling, 45-55 minutes. Serve warm with vanilla ice cream.

nectarine galette

cherries and cream slab pie (some notes on how I make pie)

It took me a long time to feel confident making pies. I never actually made one until my late twenties, as they had seemed so daunting and time consuming; so much work for something that had such a high percentage of not turning out right. My first att…

It took me a long time to feel confident making pies. I never actually made one until my late twenties, as they had seemed so daunting and time consuming; so much work for something that had such a high percentage of not turning out right. My first attempt actually was incredible: I made a perfect apple pie. The crust was flaky and golden brown, the filling perfectly cooked, with apples soft but not mushy. I remember bringing it to my Grandma’s house, and she raved and raved about it (she may have mentioned it was better than the pie my mom made) and I’m pretty sure she ate the rest of it for dinner that night. Brimming with confidence, I made another pie the next day: same recipe, same apples, same kitchen equipment, and alas, it was a total disaster. I’ve discovered I often have beginners luck with baking, only to completely mess up whatever I am making the next time I go to bake it. I think it’s the grace of the kitchen gods: they know of my love and need for baking, but also my lack of patience and follow through. I’m notorious on giving up on something […]

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