Two New Ways to Eat Your Collards & Black-Eyed Peas for the New Year

New Year’s Eve gets all the attention—Champagne and pigs in a blanket, sparklers and velvet dresses—but growing up in Alabama, it was New Year’s Day that I looked forward to the most. In my family, New Year’s Day meant a giant feast, one that was diffe…

New Year’s Eve gets all the attention—Champagne and pigs in a blanket, sparklers and velvet dresses—but growing up in Alabama, it was New Year’s Day that I looked forward to the most. In my family, New Year’s Day meant a giant feast, one that was different from our Christmas celebrations just a week before. And no matter what, we’d have the holy trinity of Southern New Year foods on the table: black-eyed peas, collard greens, and cornbread.

Black-eyed peas and collard greens are traditionally eaten on New Year’s Day across the South, to symbolize luck and money in the forthcoming year. Like so many of my favorite Southern foods, they came out of the African diaspora. Black-eyed peas are native to West Africa, a region from which many enslaved people were forcefully taken. And the style of cooking collard greens most associated with Southern food— cooked down until they’re silky and salty, thanks to the addition of a ham hock—also stems from West African cooking traditions.

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‘The Japanese Art of The Cocktail’ Is More Than Just a Cocktail Book

Mixologist Masahiro Urushido’s debut recipe book, co-authored with drinks writer Michael Anstendig, is part cocktail book, part memoir. The Japanese Art of The Cocktail tells Urushido’s story while introducing readers to the cocktail recipes he’s creat…

Mixologist Masahiro Urushido’s debut recipe book, co-authored with drinks writer Michael Anstendig, is part cocktail book, part memoir. The Japanese Art of The Cocktail tells Urushido’s story while introducing readers to the cocktail recipes he’s created along the way. The final product is a book that embodies the spirit of Urushido’s New York City bar, Katana Kitten, a distinctly Japanese-American establishment that melds the cocktail traditions of both countries to create expertly made and wonderfully playful drinks.

For Urushido, the dream of becoming a bartender wasn’t always clear. The first part of the book chronicles his journey from growing up in the small village of Minowa, drinking his first canned whiskey highballs bought at a local convenience store as a teenager, and then moving to Tokyo to complete high school while working to deliver pizzas and bartend at a karaoke bar. A combination of fate and good luck led him to a job at Tableaux, one of Japan’s most revered fine-dining restaurants at the time, working as a food runner and then barback, slowly ascending the ranks. Eventually, he moved to the U.S. to attend a junior college and began on his journey toward opening Katana Kitten.

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14 Best Cocktail Books for At-Home Mixology

Are you sick of paying $16 for a cocktail and want to learn how to mix drinks at home? Me too! This sounds like the start of an infomercial, but I promise it’s not. It’s a plea to invest in a cocktail book…well, maybe two. Written by bartenders, mixolo…

Are you sick of paying $16 for a cocktail and want to learn how to mix drinks at home? Me too! This sounds like the start of an infomercial, but I promise it’s not. It’s a plea to invest in a cocktail book…well, maybe two. Written by bartenders, mixologists, and bar managers for home bartenders, this lineup of the best cocktail books includes hundreds of recipes, thousands of techniques and tricks for mixing drinks, and pages of fascinating cocktail history. In each book, drinks experts share their go-to spirits for any number of classic cocktails and how to determine what you really like (not what you think you should like).

With a well-stocked home bar and any one of these insightful cocktail books, you’re well on your way to mastering the martini, nailing the Negroni, and feeling victorious with a bottle of vermouth in hand.

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15 Fall Cookbooks We’re Ready to Devour

For those of us who care about food, autumn leaves remind us of the glorious piles of crisp new cookbooks we can’t wait to jump into. Last year, we devoured books that were focused on family and comfort, the literary equivalents of thick sweaters and s…

For those of us who care about food, autumn leaves remind us of the glorious piles of crisp new cookbooks we can’t wait to jump into. Last year, we devoured books that were focused on family and comfort, the literary equivalents of thick sweaters and socks (looking at you, Snacking Cakes, In Bibi’s Kitchen, and Modern Comfort Food). The dishes were warm and made us feel safe—just what we needed when many things we normally turned to for those sensations (big gatherings and bigger hugs) suddenly felt out of reach. But this autumn is all about getting your groove back—at a pace that feels most sensible to the cook you are.

Think of these new books as upgrading that same sweatsuit you wore all last year to a more tailored going-out look. Maybe you’re looking forward to safely hosting a holiday meal, or having people over for a small shindig—no occasion needed. Or even simply trying new recipes at home, to remember that cooking can be a joyful, adventurous act—not just something you have to do every night. Some folks are still looking to cook easy weeknight meals. And it's possible that after all those loaves of lockdown banana bread, some people even unearthed a newfound passion for the pastry arts and are now in search of a different project.

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My Most Popular Soup Recipe Was Also My Most Disliked—Until Now

Once upon a time, I wrote a weekly column here, a project called “Twenty-Dollar, Twenty-Minute Meals.” It was a catchy idea in support of my first cookbook that inspired me to consider whole food grocery products—cans of beans, cartons of stock, jars o…

Once upon a time, I wrote a weekly column here, a project called “Twenty-Dollar, Twenty-Minute Meals.” It was a catchy idea in support of my first cookbook that inspired me to consider whole food grocery products—cans of beans, cartons of stock, jars of sauce—as shortcuts to flavor and cooking time. The column stretched my imagination of where real food can come from, like an enormous feature in a magazine I had grown accustomed to writing. Since then, my projects since have been more personal and focused on storytelling, but creativity and good home cooking remain at the center of all I do.

Now, eight years later, I am known as “Soup Lady” first and “Caroline” second among some of my friends, which is an accurate depiction of my identity, if you ask my husband. I have fallen into a life where I make an absolutely ridiculous amount of soup every week for nine months of every year—the rainy months in Seattle, referred to as “soup season” in my house, where “souping” is also a verb—for the past three years. (As you read this, I’ve just started my fourth.) I don’t want to digress too much, but suffice it to say that this soup-obsessed life found me and my ties to it are profound and emotional. I am not exaggerating when I say I believe it saved my life.

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3 Fantastic Recipes From the Newest Mushroom Cookbook

Mushroom lovers rejoice! This December a new cookbook showcasing the inventive home recipes of mushroom enthusiasts from around the country will be hitting the shelves. Fantastic Fungi Community Cookbook was compiled and edited by food writer and mushr…

Mushroom lovers rejoice! This December a new cookbook showcasing the inventive home recipes of mushroom enthusiasts from around the country will be hitting the shelves. Fantastic Fungi Community Cookbook was compiled and edited by food writer and mushroom obsessive Eugenia Bone, who also contributed several recipes and educational essays to the book.

The idea to create this community cookbook was born out of the idea to provide a mushroom cooking resource to accompany the eponymous documentary by Louie Schwartzberg. While there’s no shortage of mushroom-centric cookbooks, Bone was inspired to create something different by tapping into the community that rallied around the documentary to create a cookbook that represented the diversity of fungi and those who forage for them.

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A Week’s Worth of Black Beans Without Any Boredom

You may think it’d be impossible to eat black beans every day for five days without getting bored, but beans are so versatile, you won’t believe what you’ll be able to come up with. If you need some inspiration, here are my favorite ways to make additi…

You may think it'd be impossible to eat black beans every day for five days without getting bored, but beans are so versatile, you won't believe what you'll be able to come up with. If you need some inspiration, here are my favorite ways to make additions and variations to a big pile of black beans to get you through the workweek.


5 Days of Beans

Day 1

Make the beans! And take a look below at how I doctor them up.

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Hands Down, This Is the Most Versatile Ingredient

A Big Little Recipe has the smallest-possible ingredient list and big everything else: flavor, creativity, wow factor. That means five ingredients or fewer—not including water, salt, black pepper, and certain fats (like oil and butter), since we’re gue…

A Big Little Recipe has the smallest-possible ingredient list and big everything else: flavor, creativity, wow factor. That means five ingredients or fewer—not including water, salt, black pepper, and certain fats (like oil and butter), since we're guessing you have those covered. This month, we’re sharing sneak peeks from the Big Little Recipes cookbook, all revving up to its release on November 9 (blasts airhorn, throws confetti in the air). Today, we’re sharing an excerpt from the cookbook, all about how water is way more than just a tall drink.


Water down is another way of saying dilute value. Which is—how do I put this?—baloney. Water is one of the most cost-effective, dynamic, powerful ingredients out there. Think of it this way: Water plus something else equals . . .

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‘Mooncakes & Milk Bread’ Brings Chinese Bakery Treats to Home Bakers

Kristina Cho, the blogger behind Eat Cho Food, didn’t set out to write a cookbook that’s as full of family memories as it is delicious Chinese bakery treats. But that’s what happened when she began working on her debut cookbook, Mooncakes & Milk B…

Kristina Cho, the blogger behind Eat Cho Food, didn’t set out to write a cookbook that's as full of family memories as it is delicious Chinese bakery treats. But that’s what happened when she began working on her debut cookbook, Mooncakes & Milk Bread.

Throughout the book, Cho weaves in stories of afternoons spent at her grandfather’s restaurant, Sunday meals at her family’s favorite dim sum spot, and special trips to Chinese bakeries. “Trips to the local bakery case and vacation visits to Chinatown bakeries in other cities are some of my favorite childhood memories,” Cho writes. “It was exhilarating, getting the chance to pick out a new, shiny baked good or crisp cookie, each bite connecting me a little more to my family’s culture. Sipping on tea and pulling apart our haul of treats bit by bit, my parents and grandparents would regale us with their own memories of living in Hong Kong or even older stories of my grandparents in Taishan, China.”

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The Tale of Two Meatloaves

A Big Little Recipe has the smallest-possible ingredient list and big everything else: flavor, creativity, wow factor. That means five ingredients or fewer—not including water, salt, black pepper, and certain fats (like oil and butter), since we’re gue…

A Big Little Recipe has the smallest-possible ingredient list and big everything else: flavor, creativity, wow factor. That means five ingredients or fewer—not including water, salt, black pepper, and certain fats (like oil and butter), since we're guessing you have those covered. This month, we’re sharing sneak peeks from the Big Little Recipes cookbook, all revving up to its release on November 9 (blasts airhorn, throws confetti in the air).


I had to include the meatloaf in the Big Little Recipes cookbook. I knew this. With five ingredients—ground beef, yellow onion, bread crumbs, eggs, and ketchup—it’s just the sort of low-lift, high-reward dish that the column is all about.

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