50 Vegan Recipes

Great vegan recipes are like gold. Especially when they feature real whole foods, and lots of plants. This type of cooking supports your health and overall well-being in important ways. No meat? No dairy? No eggs? Don’t sweat it. There are many other ingredients to get excited about.

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Great vegan recipes are like gold. Especially when they feature whole foods, and lots of plants. This type of cooking supports your health and overall well-being in important ways. No meat? No dairy? No eggs? Don’t sweat it. There are many other ingredients to get excited about when you’re cooking and eating.

Mains

  1. Caramelized Tofu

    Caramelized strips of tofu served over sautéed shredded brussels sprouts. Caramelized Tofu

  2. Sunshine Pad Thai

    One simple trick makes this a turmeric noodle version of a classic. Vegan Pad Thai

  3. Last Minute Red Lasagna

    This is a true weeknight lasagna. No pre-cooking sauces, no pre-cooking noodles. Last Minute Red Lasagna

  4. Quick Vegan Enchiladas

    In the oven in less that ten minutes, and a healthful alternative to all the heavy cheese versions out there. With black beans, sweet potatoes, and a stealthy turmeric boost. Vegan Enchiladas

  5. Sushi Bowl

    a de-constructed sushi roll – brown rice, tofu, avocado, toasted nori and green onions served with a tangy, sweet citrus-soy dressing. Sushi Bowl

  6. Rice Porridge

    It’s a one pot, effortless, green, nutrient-packed twist on one of my favorite things to eat. Rice Porridge

  7. Chia Breakfast Bowl

    Chia Breakfast Bowl

  8. Vegetarian Paella

    Vegetarian Paella

  9. Steaming Vegetables

    Steaming Vegetables

  10. Green Falafel Bowl

    Green Falafel Bowl

  11. Ottolenghi Red Rice and Quinoa

  12. TLT Sandwich

  13. Pan-glazed Tempeh

  14. Weeknight Ponzu Pasta

  15. Soups

  16. Vegetable Noodle Soup

    Vegetable noodle soup is as simple, direct, and delicious as it gets. If you’re vegetarian or vegan looking for an alternative to chicken noodle soup, try this! Vegetable Noodle Soup

  17. Broccoli Cheddar Soup

    A simple, everyday broccoli soup made special with crusty, mustardy croutons and cheddar cheese. Broccoli Cheddar Soup

  18. Immunity Soup

    White pepper with jolts of ginger, and stabs of garlic – clear and strong topped with tofu, mushrooms, watermelon radish, and lots of green onions. Immunity Soup

  19. Simple Asparagus Soup

    A simple asparagus soup – fresh asparagus, new potatoes, a bit of green curry paste, and coconut milk are pureed to make this spring favorite. Simple Asparagus Soup

  20. Simple Cauliflower Soup

    This is the simplest cauliflower soup. Simple Cauliflower Soup

  21. Ribollita

    Ribollita is a thick Tuscan stew – dark greens, lots of beans, vegetables, olive oil, thickened with day-old bread. Ribollita

  22. Green Pea Soup

  23. Miso Tahini Soup

  24. Posole in Broth

  25. Leek Soup with Dill Oil

  26. Salads

  27. Taco Salad

    Tempeh taco salad – crushed tortilla chips bring the crunch, black beans and crumbled tempeh coated with taco seasoning brings the substance, and a strong, smoked paprika-apple cider dressing pulls everything together. Taco Salad<

  28. Rainbow Noodle Salad

    A radiant, color-flecked tangle of noodles, cabbage, shredded carrots, pickled sushi ginger, and an abundance of cilantro, basil, and scallions. Rainbow Noodle Salad

  29. Easy Tomato Pasta Salad

    Whole-grain pasta, baby kale, basil, and the best tomatoes you can get your hands on, with a generous drizzle of strong harissa dressing. Easy Tomato Pasta Salad

  30. Grilled Zucchini Bread Salad

  31. Smash-and-Toss Roasted Potato Salad

  32. Lazy Day Peanut Noodle Salad

  33. Summer Corn Salad

  34. Dips, Snacks and Appetizers

  35. Goth Hummus

    Goth Hummus

  36. Golden Beet Hummus

    Billowy and smooth, it’s a boosted hummus for everyday, all-day w/ golden beets, turmeric, and chickpeas. Golden Beet Hummus

  37. Turmeric Cashews

    Turmeric Cashews tossed with cayenne, nori, and sesame.

  38. Asparagus Tartine

    Avocado smeared across toasted day-old slabs of sesame bread, layered with arugula and garlicky caraway asparagus + toasted pepitas. Asparagus Tartine

  39. Roasted Tomato Salsa

    Deep, caramelized flavors of roasted tomatoes and onions alongside the smokiness of the chipotles equals the best salsa. Salsa

  40. Vegan Nachos

    Packed with beneficial spices, cashews, garlic, and grated sweet potatoes, and lasts up to a week refrigerated. Vegan Nachos

  41. Power Bars

    Savory power bars with toasted walnuts, crumbled kale chips, and oil-cured olives. Power Bars

  42. Muhammara

    Traditional red pepper spread originating from Syria made with a fascinating blend of red peppers, walnuts, olive oil, pomegranate molasses. Muhammara

  43. Mung Bean Hummus

    For creamy hummus, without the extra effort, I use mung beans instead. They work beautifully. Top the hummus with shallot oil, fresh chives Mung Bean Hummus

  44. Spicy Boosted Nut Butter

  45. Walnut Olive Miso Magic Sauce

  46. Cinnamon Vanilla Sunflower Butter

  47. Roasted Lemon Chutney

  48. Drinks and Desserts

  49. Rhubarb Rosewater Syrup

    Perfect on (or in) everything from yogurt, spritzers, waffles, or oatmeal. Rhubarb Rosewater Syrup

  50. Lime, Grapefruit and Ginger Juice

    Lime, Grapefruit and Ginger Juice

  51. Vitamin C Tea Blend

    Hibiscus and rose hips are both Vitamin C power houses. This is a much appreciated tea blend for when an immunity boost is needed. Vitamin C Tea Blend

  52. Homemade Strawberry Almond Milk

    Once you’ve tasted homemade almond milk it’s quite difficult to return to store-bought. Homemade Strawberry Almond Milk

  53. No Bake Energy Bites

    No-bake energy bites, my favorite alternative to energy bars. No Bake Energy Bites

  54. Two-ingredient Candied Citrus Lolipops

    Plump, juicy, citrus segments coated in thin, crunchy, sugar shells. Two-ingredient Candied Citrus Lolipops

My hope is you’ll find many ideas here to inspire more vegan meals in your home and life. The recipes listed here are vegan, or easily made vegan (with a minor tweak or two). I only list them here if I’ve actually mentioned how to make the recipe vegan in the recipe or in the head notes of the recipe. Here’s a favorite vegan recipe to start!

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Grillable Tofu Burgers

Seasoned with a good amount of cumin, cayenne and mustard, these are hearty, filling, easy to make, dump-everything-in-the-food processor grillable tofu burgers.

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Wayne calls this the “1996 Veggie Burger.” It’s basically an old-school hippie burger. I love them for a few reasons. First, they’re grill-able. Second, they’re made from ingredients I understand – organic tofu, seeds, nuts, eggs, spices, and breadcrumbs. And third, they’re endlessly adaptable by switching up the spices & your burger toppings.
A Grillable Tofu Burger Recipe

The Recipe

On the cooking front, I’ve been cleaning out some drawers. Primarily going through old magazine clippings (which is part of the reason I’ve been featuring more magazine inspired recipes than usual). I’ve been finding lots of gems, and these tofu burgers jumped out at me. I’ve adapted them from a reader contributed recipe that ran in the October 2004 issue of Sunset Magazine. The recipe was sent to Sunset by Jeremy Wolf of San Francisco, and I enjoyed them so much! They were impossibly easy to make, relying on the “throw everything in the food processor” technique, and called for a quirky mix of ingredients ranging from tofu, seeds, and nuts, to mustard, cumin, and mushrooms. In the years since, I’ve done a lot of variations, and I’ll talk through a few of them below.

I will say, I suspect you’ll be tempted to tweak the seasonings, and you should! But here’s my advice. Don’t skimp on the cumin or mustard, you need some assertive flavors to kick in – keep in mind you’re dealing with ground tofu and eggs as a burger base. Whatever you do think bold!

Ingredients in Food Processor for Tofu Burgers

Tofu Burgers – How To Cook Them

One of the great things about these is you can cook them a number of ways. You can use a skillet, you can grill them, or you can bake them. The main thing you need to do is blend the mixture to a smooth-ish consistency. Then firmly shape and press the mixture into firm patties. I call for the firmest tofu you can find (extra-firm), but each tofu brand has a different quantity of water in it. If your mixture is too wet, simply blend in more breadcrumbs 1/4 cup at a time, and go from there. The mixture also firms up as it sits, so keep that in mind. You can let it rest for 10 minutes or so before shaping if you have the time.
A Grillable Tofu Burger Recipe

Tofu Burger Variations

A number of people have attempted to make these without the egg. I haven’t tested that version yet, but here’s are a few notes from the comments. From Lisa,”For the vegan, I reserved part of the batch before adding eggs, and put in a tablespoon of almond butter as a binder, plus a little extra breadcrumbs.” Jacqui says,”…although I was out of eggs, so I used 2 T of chia seeds mixed with 6 T of water as a replacement. Worked great!”

For a gluten-free option Lisa commented with this brilliance, “I make something similar to these and use masa harina instead of breadcrumbs for a gluten-free option… it definitely gives it a “southwestern” twist, and is SO delicious.”

Cooking Tips

If you’re nervous about the patties falling through grill grates, Judith says,”…my husband was in charge of the grill, started out on aluminum foil, we thought they might fall through the grates, he ended up putting them right on the grates (they firmed up while cooking on the foil for a bit) and they were wonderful!”

Enjoy!!

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Pumpkin and Rice Soup

Silky textured and vibrant, the pumpkin soup I made as soon after 40 hours of travel back from India. It has a herby rosemary butter drizzle and lemon ginger pulp, and completely hits the spot.

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The provisions were scarce when we got back from India the other night – my first winter squash of the year still on the counter, brown rice in the freezer, a bit of sad looking ginger on the windowsill, random nuts and seeds in the cupboard, herbs still going strong in the planter boxes out back, and a three week old knob of butter. That was pretty much it. But I felt exhausted after getting off the plane, and after forty hours of travel from door to door, I was determined cook at home. This simple soup was the first thing I made. It was silky textured, vibrant in color, and after a quick trip to the corner store in the morning for a bit of yogurt and a lemon – the lunchtime leftovers were even better. Particularly because of a finishing touch of a rosemary herby butter drizzle and lemon ginger pulp. I hope you find it as restorative as I did. Also! I wanted to tack some photos of one of my favorite experiences from India onto this post – the day Wayne and I had our photos taken on the street in Jaipur.

Pumpkin and Rice Soup Recipe

I’d read about this man, Tikam Chand. He has been taking pictures in the Old City of Jaipur using his grandfather’s camera for decades. And, upon arriving in Jaipur, we set out to find him. No luck, at first. But a couple of days passed, and finally, at a moment we weren’t looking, Wayne spotted a guy with an old camera on the sidewalk. We pulled over, hopped out, and it wasn’t ten seconds before we were in front of the camera. Sixty seconds and five frames had been snapped. Sit here, look here, you two together, and so forth. I was thinking it was very much like getting a dental x-ray. Much more fun, but still – all business. And it wasn’t Tikam with the camera, it was Surrender. I’m still not entirely clear on whether the two photographers share the camera, or if they’re related.

Pumpkin and Rice Soup RecipePumpkin and Rice Soup Recipe

So, you have your picture taken, and that’s when things start getting incredible. The processing is done right there on the street, and is finished in just a few minutes. A box in the back of the camera functions as the darkroom, negatives made from small sheets of hand-torn photo paper are slapped on a piece of wood, and shot again to make the positives. There’s a bucket for rinsing. Your completed pictures (and negatives if you splurge for them) are unceremoniously wrapped in a zig-zag folded sheet of the daily newspaper. It all goes down fast, and somewhat hilariously. For those of you who are interested in the specifics of how this works, I found this (Jonas also has some amazing Jaipur photos).

Pumpkin and Rice Soup Recipe

The head-to-toe shot of us up above might be my favorite shot ever of the two of us together.

Pumpkin and Rice Soup Recipe

An out of focus shot of the camera from the front. All eyes on Krishna. There’s no shutter, so to expose the frame, the red foil lens cap is moved to the side for a second or so. Part of what I loved about the whole experience was how unfussy, and non-technical it was. This guy had a good lens on a box set on a tripod that looked like a few sticks of driftwood bound together. And his photos are beautiful in a way you’ll never get with a new camera. Completely inspiring. 

Pumpkin and Rice Soup Recipe
Anyway! I have much more to share with you, in the meantime enjoy the soup. Trick it out with the good toppings, and I’m almost positive it’ll become a staple for you this fall/winter – or, at least, I hope so. xo -hPumpkin and Rice Soup Recipe

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Spaghetti with No-Cook Sauce

A tangle of spaghetti, olives, nuts, vegetables, and torn mozzarella in a no-cook, lemon-zested tomato sauce. A recipe for a hot night when tomato season is at its peak.

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You can tell by the streak of tomato recipes here lately, I’m in the thick of it. And today is no exception. I made this for dinner last night, and if you have a box of spaghetti and some good tomatoes you’re half way there. What you see is a tangle of spaghetti, olives, nuts, vegetables, and torn mozzarella in a no-cook, lemon-zested tomato sauce. It’s bright, summery, colorful food, easy to adapt based on what you have on hand. The key? Make it on an extra hot night when tomato season is at its maximum. And don’t even mess around if your tomatoes aren’t on point.

Spaghetti with No-Cook Sauce

So Many Variations!

This is a quintessential pantry meal. I added olives, pine nuts, and a bit of cheese to the base ingredients of spaghetti and tomatoes, but you can experiment with endless other directions. I love the pine nut component here, but toasted almonds, walnuts, hazelnuts, or cashew would all be great. You could do a spicy version by adding a dollop of harissa to the sauce, or some chile flakes, or a tablespoon of toasted sesame chile oil. On the vegetable front, you see string beans pictured (because that’s whats coming out of my garden right now), but load up on anything from broccoli and cauliflower florets, or asparagus – basically, any quick cooking veg that you can throw in the pasta water at the last minute.

Tomatoes from the Garden

The Spaghetti

Use your favorite spaghetti noodle here. I love a traditional spaghetti noodle, don’t get me wrong, but one of the big surprises to me over the past few years is how good some of the whole grain and pulse-based pastas are. There is a wide range of brands around, so you’ll need to experiment. My advice on this front is to “date around” until you find a few brands and shapes you like. For day to day pasta eating when you compare nutritional labels, the noodles made with more whole ingredients can deliver significantly more vitamins, minerals, fiber, protein and the like. So it’s worth it to play around.
Spaghetti with No-Cook Sauce
If you’re looking for more tomato-centric recipes — I posted this tomato tart recently. Try a fresh version of this tomato sauce. Make this favorite salsa. Or add them into a summery coleslaw. If you’re just looking for summery favorites, try this Grilled Zucchini & Bread Salad, this Pasta with Smashed Zucchini Cream, or this Zucchini Bread. Enjoy!

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A Favorite Rice Noodle Stir Fry to Make with Whatever Green Veg you Have

A favorite noodle-based stir fry with silky rice noodles, bright and crunchy broccoli, toasted cashews, quick-marinated crumbled tofu, and pan-seared onions tossed in a feisty chile-boosted soy sauce.

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If you messaged me this week after I posted a badly lit photo of an exceptionally tasty stir fry on Instagram, this is 100% for you!  It’s the kind of stir fry I pull together often, a catch-all of things needing to be used up. You’ve got silky rice noodles, bright and crunchy broccoli, toasted cashews, quick-marinated crumbled tofu, and pan-seared onions tossed in a feisty chile-boosted soy sauce. I added mushrooms the second time I made it (for these photos), but you don’t have to. I used broccoli, but you can use asparagus, shredded brussels sprouts or kale. I’ll talk more about that down below. I definitely tend to do that thing you’re not supposed to do here – overload the pan- but it’s the kind of one-pan meal I love. Enjoy!

A Fave Rice Noodle Stir Fry Recipe
A couple things before we get to the recipe. If you make a lot of stir fries, consider investing in a wok. The cast iron wok I bought with Grace Young from The Wok Shop in San Francisco years ago is one of my prized cooking vessels (this is the one). It’s the kind Cantonese home cooks swear by to impart the coveted taste of wok hay. I’m not saying I’m there yet, but I aspire. And if you don’t have a wok, don’t let it deter you – grab your largest skillet and use it for your stir fry.
A Fave Rice Noodle Stir Fry with Whatever Green Veg you Have on Hand

A Few Stir Fry Variations

I’ll put most of this in headnotes of the recipe as well.

Green Vegetables: I’m writing this recipe up using broccoli as the green vegetable here, but you have lots of other options. Use an equivalent amount of asparagus (1 1/2-inch segments), or 4-5 big handfuls of , chopped kale, pre-cooked artichoke hearts are fair game, or peas, (or pea shoots!). You see where I’m heading? This is all really adaptable based on what you have on hand.

Make it a Little Creamy: A splash of coconut milk toward the end is nice.

Citrus is Good: One of my favorite finishing touches here is to throw something citrusy in at the end. I have a market lime tree on the patio, so I often sliver a couple leaves razor thin and add them at the end. Lemon zest, Meyer lemon zest, and/or orange zest is equally welcome here. Totally not necessary, but it really is a nice touch.

A Fave Rice Noodle Stir Fry Recipe

Boil versus Soaking the Noodles

I’m having you boil the noodles here to get them just the right amount of tender. It’s what I did to get dinner on the table quickly the other night, and works great. The common alternative is to soak them, but there is such a wide range of noodles out there, and I’m sure you’ll all use quite a range of them, so I think boiling them is the safest bet for consistency across the board. Depending on the noodles, sometimes the soak technique doesn’t work, and you end up boiling them anyway.

Recipe Journal Entry of a Stir Fry with Handwriting and Photo
Here’s the photo I posted taped in my recipe journal along with notes about how to make it after dinner the other night. I do this when I want to remember something I liked so I can make it again at some point. You can see the size of the noodles I used (left-hand page), and I also like to leave “next time” notes to myself (down in the corner) – ways to tweak, flavors or ingredients to add or explore, etc. Enjoy!

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Homemade Refried Beans

If you’ve only ever had refried beans from a can, this should be the next recipe you cook. Homemade refried beans are a game-changer. Use just the right amount of olive oil to cook well-minced onions along with the beans and plenty of their broth. Smoked paprika adds a hint of smoky depth you can’t quite put a finger on, my secret ingredient is a finishing splash of freshly squeezed lemon juice. I think it’s the element that helps keep the beans from seeming too heavy, and the acidity counters the starchiness of the beans.

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If you’ve only had refried beans from a can, this should be the next recipe you cook. Homemade refried beans are a game-changer. They’re simple to make and having them on hand makes it simple to throw together meals for days. Think tacos, tostadas, chilaquiles, and next-level bean dips. There are a lot of opinions about how to make refried beans. I’ll just say this: when I’m home alone, and there’s no one else to share a meal with, this is how I cook them. This version is so incredibly good that I usually just enjoy them by the spoonful. But it’s also so simple that I didn’t think to share the recipe here until a number of you asked when you saw me cooking in one of my Stories recently. So here we go!
Homemade Refried Beans Recipe

My Refried Bean Technique

The way I cook refried beans is quite straight-forward, although I do have a couple somewhat unconventional moves that I stand by. I like my beans with depth and flavor, while still maintaining some brightness and lightness. I use just the right amount of olive oil to cook well-minced onions along with the beans and plenty of their broth. Smoked paprika adds a hint of smoky depth you can’t quite put a finger on, while keeping things vegetarian. My secret ingredient is a finishing splash of freshly squeezed lemon juice. I think it’s the element that helps keep the beans from seeming too heavy, and the acidity counters the starchiness of the beans. Don’t skimp on the lemon juice.
Pinto Beans in a Clay Pot

Good Beans Matter

I feel like a bit of a broken record. You hear this from me every time I feature a bean recipe. Try to purchase dried beans from a source that has good turnover. You don’t want to buy a bag of dusty, sad beans that has been on the shelf too long. Bulk sections of grocery stores often move through their beans and pulses quickly, or keep your eyes peeled for dried beans at your local farmers markets, co-ops, and the like. Or, search around for heirloom beans online – there are so many wonderful beautiful varietals. I use pinto beans here, but you can certainly explore other types of beans – black beans, cranberry beans, etc. Play around!
Homemade Refried Beans Recipe

Mash Before Cooking

One last thing I’ll mention before we get to the recipe. A lot of people like to mash their beans at the end of the cooking process, but I usually do it at the beginning. It’s less messy this way, you aren’t working over a hot burner, and I find it easier to get the the consistency just right. I’ll mention it down below, a potato masher is great for this. Any mashing tool: a pestle in a bowl, a big fork, whatever can smash beans. A few pulses with a hand blender can also work, but I like the consistency you get from doing it by hand, and there’s no extra appliance to wash.

I hope you try these! They really are one of my favorite simple culinary pleasures. And if you’re on the lookout for other bean inspiration I’ve done this post about how to cook beans that are tender, creamy and nearly perfect using an easy, lower temperature long cooking method. Enjoy!

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Pasta with Creamy Crushed Walnut Sauce

Toasted walnuts pounded with garlic into a creamy sauce make this pasta easy and exceptional. If you have dried pasta, a few cloves of garlic, walnuts, and black pepper you can make this. The other ingredients – lemon zest, a bit of grated cheese, a finishing cascade of breadcrumbs and herbs are encouraged, but not essential.

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This is the best thing I’ve cooked with the least amount of effort in the past month. Most of my lazy lunches never make it to the site, but this pasta is an exception. If you have a favorite dried pasta, a few cloves of garlic, walnuts, and black pepper you can make it too. The other ingredients – lemon zest, a bit of grated cheese, a finishing cascade of breadcrumbs and herbs are encouraged, but not essential. It’s the kind of meal that checks the box when you’re in the mood for creamy pasta, but no cream is needed. You get rich, nutty, walnut sauce from pounding garlic and toasted walnuts into a paste and thinning with a good amount of salted pasta water. Peak comfort food.

Pasta with Creamy Crushed Walnut Sauce

What type of pasta to use?

I vote for short pasta here, preferably something whole grain and somewhat rustic. The pasta you see pictured is emmer reginetti. I grabbed it on a whim the first time I cooked this and it worked beautifully for this recipe. The way the ruffles catch just the right amount of creamy walnuts is a thing of beauty. That said, play around with different pastas, and experiment with shapes you love. Fusilli might be great, or even little shells.

Pasta with Creamy Crushed Walnut Sauce

Variations:

Experiment with other nuts: You might be able to do a nice alternative version of the walnut sauce with toasted almonds, or toasted pecans instead. Or a blend of whatever nuts you have available. I’ve been doing 100% walnuts but suspect using other nuts would be great. The key is seasoning well – salt, pepper, and a bit of lemon juice. Take your time getting this part right.

Add some green! Throw a bunch of broccoli florets or asparagus in to the pasta pot at the last minute to add a veg component to this without getting another pot dirty. We were out of both (yikes) or you would have seen one of them make an appearance here.

Leftovers! Make a quick pasta & bean stew if you have leftovers. Combine the walnut-y pasta with some white beans in a saucepan. Add good tasting broth, heat, season, and add a bit of grated cheese to bring it all together. A handful of well-chopped kale wouldn’t be unwelcome.
Pasta with Creamy Crushed Walnut Sauce

More Pasta!

If you need more pasta inspiration try this Pasta with Etruscan Sauce, or my favorite go-to tomato sauce (for pasta & pizzas), Curried Tomato Tortellini Soup, or Pasta with Smashed Zucchini Cream (in summer). A fun project is making homemade gnocchi, but if that’s a bit too ambitious try this Last-Minute Lasagna recipe, Orzo Super Salad, or family-favorite stuffed shells. There’s also a huge archive of pasta recipes and dinner ideas!

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Ten Freezer-Friendly Pantry Soups

Pantry soups forever. A collection of favorite soups and stews that rely on pantry staples like beans, grains, rice, canned tomatoes, and the like – ingredients you might have in your cupboard.

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Hi everyone. Not surprisingly, I’m getting a lot of requests for pantry soup recipes right now. I made a couple myself this week (a red cabbage version of ribollita, and a simple farro & bean soup), and it’s the kind of cooking I love most. I hope you’ll find some inspiration in this collection of favorite soups and stews that rely on pantry staples like beans, grains, rice, canned tomatoes, and the like – ingredients you might have in your cupboard. Keep in mind, many of them are very adaptable, meaning that I encourage you to make substitutes if you don’t have an ingredient or two! I’ll give some easy swap suggestions in the list below. And if you aren’t sure if a substitution will work or not, please message me on Instagram – I’m more than happy to help you come up with a plan.

Chickpea & Rice Soup with Garlic Chile Oil

1. Chickpea & Rice Soup with Garlic Chile Oil – A chunky rice soup, studded with lots of chickpeas, flecked with kale, and drizzled with a vibrant garlic-chile oil. It has peanuts, and a dusting of turmeric. It freezes beautifully, and you can experiment with a range of toppings.

Ribollita

2. RibollitaThis classic Tuscan stew is such a great way to get everything you need to use in your kitchen into one delicious pot – day (or two)-old bread, carrots that are no logger snappy, leafy greens, etc. I had a cabbage that needed a purpose the other night – chopped it, and into the pot it went. Use beans from your pantry stash, canned tomatoes, and a medley of vegetables. It’s also a great way to eat the rainbow, and get a wide range of healthful ingredients into your bowl.

Green Lentil Soup with Curried Brown Butter

3. Green Lentil Soup with Curried Brown ButterGreen lentils (or split peas), topped with a curried brown butter drizzle. This version calls for cubes of pan-fried paneer on top, but you could skip that and just do a bit of grated cheese. Or! You can certainly explore a vegan version – infuse some olive oil or coconut oil with spices, and brown some tofu in place of paneer. A different beast, but also really good.

Curried Tomato Tortellini Soup

4. Curried Tomato Tortellini SoupA fortifying lentil and tomato-based stew, dotted with plump, tender dumplings, spiked with a range of spices, and boosted with plenty of spinach. It’s so delicious, and simple, week-night friendly, and great for leftovers. Also, no shame in using frozen spinach, here. It cuts the already minimal prep time here down to near nothing.

Spicy Taco Soup Recipe

5. Spicy Taco SoupYou can make this one in an Instant Pot, but you don’t have to. It’s pretty much just a dump & stir situation consisting of a hearty melding of beans, corn, taco spices, and quinoa. Frozen corn is fine. I bring the creaminess and crunch factor in via the toppings – toasted pepitas for the later, ripe avocado or guacamole, and a dollop of yogurt for the creamy.

Lively Up Yourself Lentil Soup

6. Lively Up Yourself Lentil SoupA simple yet satisfying lentil soup where the tang of tomatoes plays off the earthiness of lentils, with a fragrant bolt of saffron yogurt as the closer. It has been up on my site for years, and I’ve been meaning to reshoot the photos for nearly as long. A lot of you have cooked this, and have left some great adaptations in the comments – I’ve pulled a few favorites into the main post.

Vegetarian Split Pea Soup

7. Vegetarian Split Pea SoupA delicious, healthy, textured soup made from an impossibly short list of ingredients. Seriously, just five! Simply green split peas and onions cooked until tender, partially pureed, seasoned and flared out with toppings.

Coconut Red Lentil Soup

8. Coconut Red Lentil SoupBased on an Ayurvedic dal recipe in the Esalen Cookbook, I love this recipe so much. It’s worth trying even if you don’t have the exact spices. Just wing it a bit! No ghee or coconut oil, use olive oil. No ginger? Try some garlic instead.

Simple Farro & Bean Soup

9. Simple Farro & Bean SoupThe sort of hearty, timeless, comforting soup that helps in times like these. I made it earlier this week and felt a bit better because of it. There’s chopping to do, which keeps the hands busy and mind focused. The foundation ingredients are flexible and straight from the pantry – grains, canned tomatoes, beans. And if you have a lot of produce that needs to be used, a soup like this is perfect – eat some, freeze some. The ultimate pantry soup.

Richard Olney's Garlic Soup

10. Richard Olney’s Garlic SoupThe ultimate comfort soup. Creamy and full-bodied without the use of cream, it is made by simmering a dozen or so cloves of garlic in water with a few herbs, then thickening the broth with a mixture of egg and shredded cheese. It’s hard to beat a big ladleful poured over crusty, day-old walnut baguette with a finishing slick of olive oil.

And if none of these pantry soups seems to hit the spot for you, here’s an entire section of soup recipes. Or, here’s a round-up of blender soups. Or a collection of amazing vegetable broths. xx, -h

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Bryant Terry’s Amazing Green Rice

A very special green rice. A blender of green juice made from kale, spinach, and a creamy stock is cooked with onions, garlic, green pepper, and long-grain rice. It all cooks together into an intensely green and fragrant pot of fluffy grains.

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Hi all, I hope everyone is hanging in there during all of this uncertainty. I’ve been trying to stay off my phone and focus instead on doing things that are positive and productive close to home. There’s a lot of cooking and baking going on and I wanted to share this gem of a recipe. It’s an amazing green rice from Bryant Terry’s new book, Vegetable Kingdom. If you’ve got some greens on hand, and some rice, you must, must, must make it. It really is so good. A blender of green juice made from kale, spinach, and a creamy stock is cooked with onions, garlic, green pepper, and long-grain rice. It all cooks together into an intensely green and fragrant pot of fluffy grains.

Bryant Terry's Amazing Green Rice

Give it a Try, Really!

Let me just also say, I know some of you are shy about cooking rice.  Even if you think you’re no good at cooking it, push those thoughts aside and give this recipe a try. It’s worth a go. Because even if you don’t nail your rice perfectly, close enough is good enough here, and you can make adjustment based on your experience the next time around! Also, consider doubling the recipe while you’re at it, its a great way to up your greens consumption. I’m going to list the ways I’ve been using this green rice for leftovers below.
Bryant Terry's Amazing Green Rice

Green Rice Leftover Ideas

There are so many(!) things you can do with leftover green rice. Here are a few to consider.

Fried rice: Cook day-old rice in a skillet with extra garlic, a bit of chopped up omelette, a bit of tofu, maybe add a handful of broccoli?

Onigiri: Shape the green rice into chubby triangles and pan-fry until crusted and golden. You can even tuck a bit of tofu or a few edamame into the center for added surprise.

Green Burrito with Guacamole: Do a version of this quinoa burrito, but use this green rice in place of the quinoa.

Green Rice Soup: Make a green version of this rice soup (I actually made this for dinner last night) – basically thin the rice out to desired consistency with stock or water, season, and go from there with toppings, etc.

Green Rice Cakes: Whisk an egg or two into the rice (1 for each cup of rice), shape into patties and pan-fry into rice cakes.

Whole Grain Green Rice: Do a version using brown basmati or brown jasmine rice. Up the liquid, and cooking time a bit based on the rice you’re using, and package instructions.
Bryant Terry author of Vegetable Kingdom

Topping Ideas

It’s all about the crunch here. Toasted nuts, crispy shallots, toasted nori, citrus zest, sesame seeds, crumbled kale chips.
Bryant Terry author of Vegetable Kingdom
More ways to find Bryant! On Instagram, his site, on Twitter.

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Really Great Vegan Ramen

Today we’re going to tackle great vegan ramen. Vegetarian or vegan ramen can absolutely be as good as its meat-based counterparts. You introduce your favorite noodles to a rich, miso-scallion nut-milk broth. Add a blitz of seasonal toppings, and spicy turmeric oil to finish.

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Today we’re going to tackle vegan ramen. Slurping noodles from a big bowl of feisty, aromatic broth is hard to beat, and I wanted to share how great ramen bowls can come together relatively easily, year round. Ramen is incredibly versatile, and I play fast and loose with the concept overall. You have the ability to adapt the noodles, the tare (seasoning), the broth base, and the toppings. I’ll talk through a bunch of the ways you can play around below. The goal here is to give you a great jumping off point. This approach allows you to wing it on a weeknight based on what you have on hand.

A Really Great Vegan Ramen Recipe (and Four Seasons of Ideas)

What Makes a Great Vegetarian or Vegan Ramen?

If I’m eating out, and a vegetarian or vegan ramen is on the menu, I’ll order it. I’ve had some incredible versions, but broadly speaking they can be very salty, and quite oily. This version is not that. In fact, part of what I love about making ramen at home is that you can season your broth to be just how you like it. You can really personalize it. This version delivers a rich miso-scallion nut milk broth. You introduce your favorite noodles, a blitz of seasonal toppings, and spicy turmeric oil to finish.

A Really Great Vegan Ramen Recipe (and Four Seasons of Ideas)

How to Choose Your Noodles

There are many different noodles you can use here. Seek out fresh udon or ramen noodles, or keep a variety of dried noodles on hand for last-minute ramen. Soba noodles work great. I’ve also been using some of the whole-grain noodles, and they’re pretty good. The one in the photograph is a millet & brown rice ramen.

What is Miso Tare?

Think of this as the seasoning paste for your ramen broth. I’ve included a base recipe here, but please(!) use it as a jumping off point. It’s fine to adapt with other chopped herbs and spices as well. My main advice here – make a big batch of the miso tare and keep it on hand. I keep some in the refrigerator, and the bulk portioned out in the freezer. This is the secret to quick weeknight ramen. If you’re avoiding soy, use a chickpea miso.

The Importance of Great Broth

You want to get the broth right. My favorite broth base for this is a blend of homemade cashew milk & almond milk. It has beautiful body and flavor, and grips the noodles nicely. That said, there are plenty of nights when I’m feeling lazy, and I just grab for whatever almond milk is in the refrigerator. Still delicious.

The Secret Turmeric Weapon

This is another component you can keep on hand. Both in the refrigerator and/or freezer. If you have everything else needed to make a ramen bowl, but don’t have the spice oil – cheat with a dollop of something spicy from the condiments in your refrigerator, or stir some crushed chile flakes into a bit of oil over gentle heat, and use that as a finishing drizzle, or to toss the raw veggies.

Keep your Vegan Ramen Seasonal

The ramen you see pictured is a late-summer version, but part of the fun here is adapting through the year. Toss quick-cooking vegetables like broccoli, asparagus, and cauliflower into the noodle water for the last minute, and drain everything together. No need to get an extra pot going.

If you like this recipe, be sure to browse all these other favorite soup recipes as well!

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