I Found Inner Peace Playing a Video Game About Growing Rice

As someone who is both a food editor and lifelong video game enthusiast, I’ve predictably played a ton of food-themed games. Over the last year, games have kept me excellent company, serving as a satisfying and consistent way to pass what I’ll refer to…

As someone who is both a food editor and lifelong video game enthusiast, I've predictably played a ton of food-themed games. Over the last year, games have kept me excellent company, serving as a satisfying and consistent way to pass what I'll refer to as "time." I revisited the food-centric games I previously loved, like Stardew Valley, Overcooked, the eerily realistic Cooking Simulator, and every last Cooking Mama. I've cooked my way through Zelda: Breath of the Wild, Final Fantasy XV (whose food imagery is stunning), and World of Warcraft. But when I popped recent release Sakuna: Of Rice & Ruin into my Switch a few months ago, I felt genuinely connected to the food I was interacting with on the screen for the first time.

In this farming, friend-feeding, and enemy-pummeling role-playing game, rice is king, and you happen to live on a paddy. Oh, and you've never grown rice before. Additionally, you're a harvest goddess coming down from quite the hot mess of a sake bender (see: "& Ruin"), so the stakes are pretty high.

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Will Regenerative Agriculture Change How We Grocery Shop?

Look for the word “regenerative” at your local grocery store. Chances are, you’ll spot it on boxes of mac and cheese, cartons of milks, or even bags of chips. Regenerative agriculture, also called carbon farming, has become the latest darling of everyo…

Look for the word "regenerative" at your local grocery store. Chances are, you'll spot it on boxes of mac and cheese, cartons of milks, or even bags of chips. Regenerative agriculture, also called carbon farming, has become the latest darling of everyone from food companies to universities to politicians. But what is regenerative agriculture? How do products made with these practices differ from others, and can buying them help consumers fight the climate crisis? Here's what you need to know about this farming philosophy.

What Is Regenerative Agriculture?

Ask 10 different people to define regenerative agriculture, and you'll get 10 different answers. There is no one single definition, although several organizations are currently working to establish formal guidelines.

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It’s Not Too Late to Start a Vegetable Garden—Blue Hill Shows Us How

You might have a scallion, shooting out of its bulb, sitting in your windowsill. Or a stalk of romaine, stretching up and away from its leafy base, waiting to be plucked. The coronavirus pandemic and widespread stay at home orders saw our ideas about k…

You might have a scallion, shooting out of its bulb, sitting in your windowsill. Or a stalk of romaine, stretching up and away from its leafy base, waiting to be plucked. The coronavirus pandemic and widespread stay at home orders saw our ideas about kitchens, and our practices of feeding ourselves take new shape, much of it couched in self-sufficiency. As we eke into the fifth month spent relatively homebound, the team at Blue Hill at Stone Barns is developing an even more comprehensive way to grow at home.

When COVID-19 hit, like many restaurants across the country, Blue Hill at Stone Barns was forced to let go of a majority of their employees. Located an hour north of New York City, the restaurant and the farmland upon which it sits were suddenly, uncharacteristically empty. Chef Dan Barber and Jack Algiere, the Stone Barns farm director, considered their now-jobless cooks, starting with a guiding inquiry: “What would it look like if out-of-work cooks around the world dug in and built a garden?” Thus, the The Kitchen Farming Project, was born: An online curriculum for first-time gardeners wanting to plant, harvest, and cook all their own food at home.

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Farmworkers Are Essential, but Their Rights Don’t Reflect That

From the windows of my apartment in Brooklyn, I’ve been watching the odd things—a person in a full hazmat suit walking their dog—but also the constant things.

A huge FreshDirect delivery truck pulls up on my block at least once per day, and food deliv…

From the windows of my apartment in Brooklyn, I’ve been watching the odd things—a person in a full hazmat suit walking their dog—but also the constant things.

A huge FreshDirect delivery truck pulls up on my block at least once per day, and food delivery workers—hustling on foot, moped, or bicycle—continue to provide my and countless other neighborhoods in New York with their desired meals, despite the danger of coming into contact with so many households.

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This Company Lets You Rent Chickens. Here’s What That Means for Our Food System.

What happens to food before it hits a supermarket shelf? This seemingly simple question has an exceedingly nuanced answer, with many of those nuances nearly invisible to the consumer—from the economic barriers smaller farmers face, to the inhumane cond…

What happens to food before it hits a supermarket shelf? This seemingly simple question has an exceedingly nuanced answer, with many of those nuances nearly invisible to the consumer—from the economic barriers smaller farmers face, to the inhumane conditions of factory farms. Made uneasy by this disconnect, more and more consumers are seeking a renewed connection to their food sources, or hoping to educate their children about where food comes from.

In the past decade, one particularly unconventional solution has emerged: chicken renting. Businesses deliver chickens (and a coop) to clients for a month or summer, then take them back for the winter.

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The ABCs of Good Food: A Is for Access

What’s the difference between cage-free, pastured, and humane eggs? And why do they cost eight dollars at the farmers’ market, but a dollar at the supermarket? What does “organic” really mean? The ABCs of Good Food will attempt to answer these question…

What's the difference between cage-free, pastured, and humane eggs? And why do they cost eight dollars at the farmers' market, but a dollar at the supermarket? What does "organic" really mean? The ABCs of Good Food will attempt to answer these questions—and ask some new ones—one letter at a time.


What Is Food Access?

Access to food refers to our ability to source good, quality food—food that's filling and adequate for our individual needs. For many, this means it's fresh and minimally processed, and good for the community and planet.

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