Strawberry Basil Focaccia Bread.

Hello new favorite summer bread! It’s strawberry focaccia and I am all about it. And the first strawberry recipe of the season is out of the gate! Okay so I might have, like, ten strawberry recipes for you this year. I CAN’T HELP IT. They’ve been my favorite fruit for as long as I’ve been […]

The post Strawberry Basil Focaccia Bread. appeared first on How Sweet Eats.

Hello new favorite summer bread! It’s strawberry focaccia and I am all about it.

strawberry basil focaccia

And the first strawberry recipe of the season is out of the gate!

sliced strawberries

Okay so I might have, like, ten strawberry recipes for you this year. I CAN’T HELP IT.

They’ve been my favorite fruit for as long as I’ve been eating fruit. 

Strawberry has also always been my go-to flavor. We’re talking artificial flavors, of course. While both of my brothers worshipped at the altar of anything cherry, I was strawberry all the way. Cherry tasted like cough syrup and I just couldn’t do it.

Sure, that’s changed and now I do like cherry. BUT I LOVE STRAWBERRY. Forever and ever. Amen.

sliced strawberries close up

And I 100% am the person who leaves behind all of the grape popsicles. Never could get into grape.

focaccia with caramelized onions and strawberries

This year, I have been living for savory strawberry recipes. Yes, I have two sweet ones to share with you too (one is actually from last year… it’s a long story, haha), but I’ve been craving savory recipes where strawberries are just part of the bunch. Where they add a hint of sweetness.

Sort of like this strawberry pizza that may have freaked you out.

And like this focaccia!

strawberry basil focaccia

Okay – they might add more than a hint of sweetness. But it’s in a really good way. The focaccia bread is still chewy and salty – oh and especially those crispy, crunchy edges?! Live for them.

I threw a ton of basil on top. I was already hooked on the idea of strawberry basil focaccia. Then I googled strawberry focaccia to make sure it wasn’t completely over done. And I saw saveur had added caramelized onions to a strawberry focaccia, knew I’d love it since I did it on pizza, so I had to add caramelized onions to my strawberry focaccia!

strawberry basil focaccia

Yes, the obsession with this bread is still going. Last year I made a grilled focaccia and I still dream about that. Honestly might make it this weekend because it’s incredible. And of course – pretzel focaccia! I don’t even want to think about it because it’s unreal. 

I’m excited to add this one to the bunch. It’s chewy, salty, sweet and has the most refreshing bite from the herbs. Serve it as an appetizer, a snack, a side dish at dinner… whatever you like!

strawberry basil focaccia

Strawberry Focaccia

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Strawberry Basil Focaccia

This strawberry focaccia bread is the perfect sweet and savory combo. Caramelized onions, strawberries, basil and flaky salt!
Course Side Dish
Cuisine American
Prep Time 2 hours 40 minutes
Cook Time 20 minutes
Total Time 3 hours
Servings 8 to 10 people
Author How Sweet Eats

Ingredients

  • 1 3/4 cups warm water
  • 2 1/4 teaspoons active dry yeast
  • 1 tablespoon honey
  • 5 cups all-purpose flour plus more for your workspace
  • 1 tablespoon kosher salt plus more for sprinkling
  • 1 cup extra virgin olive oil
  • 2 tablespoons unsalted butter
  • 1 large sweet onion, thinly sliced
  • salt and black pepper
  • 2 tablespoons balsamic vinegar
  • 1 ½ cups sliced strawberries
  • flaked salt, for sprinkling
  • 1 big handful of basil leaves, thinly sliced or torn

Instructions

  • In a bowl, stir together the water, yeast and honey. Let it sit for 10 to 15 minutes until foamy.
  • In the bowl of your stand mixer, add the flour, 1 tablespoon of salt, 1/2 cup of olive oil and the yeast mixture. Stir, using the dough hook, until the mixture comes together. Knead it on medium-low speed for 5 to 6 minutes. If it's super sticky, sprinkle in a bit of extra flour. You want it to be silky!
  • Put the dough in an oiled bowl and cover it. Place it in a warm spot and let it rise for 1 hour, or until it's doubled in size.
  • After it's doubled, place the remaining oil in a 15 1/2 x 10 inch jelly roll sheet pan. Place the dough in the sheet pan and turn it over to cover it in the oil once, then press and spread it until it fits in the pan (or almost fits in the pan. it's going to rise again!). While doing this, press to make finger marks in the dough so it looks like traditional focaccia. Cover the sheet pan and place the dough back in a warm place to rise for another hour.
  • While it’s doing the second rise, heat a large skillet over medium-low heat and add the butter. Stir in the onions with a pinch of salt. Cook for 10 minutes, stirring often, until softened. Stir in the balsamic vinegar. Cook for another 10 to 15 minutes, until caramely.
  • Preheat the oven to 425 degrees F. Uncover the pan and cover the bread with the caramelized onions and thinly sliced strawberries. Sprinkle with a pinch of flaked salt. Drizzle with olive oil. Bake the bread for 15 to 20 minutes, until it's golden and toasty. Remove from the oven and let it cool. Top with fresh sliced basil and cut into pieces. Serve!
  • You can make this ahead of time and slice right before serving. You can reheat in a low temp oven (like 250) for a few minutes before eating.

Notes

caramelized onion idea from saveur

strawberry basil focaccia

It’s like savory dessert focaccia!

The post Strawberry Basil Focaccia Bread. appeared first on How Sweet Eats.

Sourdough Focaccia (no-knead)

As an obsession with sourdough bread has occurred, my attention has turned to alternative uses for my starter, other than boules. It turns out that sourdough focaccia is my new favourite go-to bread to make! It’s got a very similar dough method to my standard boule but it’s ready the same day the dough is made and it’s a lot easier to shape/bake (no banneton, no shaping, no dutch oven needed!). All you need is a bowl, a baking tray and a HOT oven! I am also notoriously bad at slicing bread boules (TOO crusty and also very prone to becoming slanted when I cut them!) so focaccia is my bestie now – it’s very easy to slice into chubby, bubbly hunks. You can split a square of it in half and toast (and eat as you would sliced bread) or just serve in all its glory as a chunk on the side of your dinner! It goes very well with all types of anti-pasti type toppings (chopped tomatoes with balsamic, artichoke hearts, fresh mozzarella, pesto, hummus etc) so makes for a very simple and satisfying dinner. To Fold or Not to Fold? I’ve tested the recipe quite a few […]

The post Sourdough Focaccia (no-knead) appeared first on Izy Hossack – Top With Cinnamon.

a closeup image of baked sourdough focaccia

As an obsession with sourdough bread has occurred, my attention has turned to alternative uses for my starter, other than boules. It turns out that sourdough focaccia is my new favourite go-to bread to make! It’s got a very similar dough method to my standard boule but it’s ready the same day the dough is made and it’s a lot easier to shape/bake (no banneton, no shaping, no dutch oven needed!). All you need is a bowl, a baking tray and a HOT oven!

sourdough focaccia dough in a baking tray on a counter
holding a slice of sourdough focaccia

I am also notoriously bad at slicing bread boules (TOO crusty and also very prone to becoming slanted when I cut them!) so focaccia is my bestie now – it’s very easy to slice into chubby, bubbly hunks. You can split a square of it in half and toast (and eat as you would sliced bread) or just serve in all its glory as a chunk on the side of your dinner! It goes very well with all types of anti-pasti type toppings (chopped tomatoes with balsamic, artichoke hearts, fresh mozzarella, pesto, hummus etc) so makes for a very simple and satisfying dinner.

To Fold or Not to Fold?

I’ve tested the recipe quite a few times now and so have tried various techniques out on the dough. I compared a version where I performed coil folds every 30 mins for 4 hours (the ‘bulk rise’), with a version where I just left the dough to do its thing (no ‘kneading’) for 4 hours. What surprised me was that both versions turned out extremely well! The no-knead version had less of an open crumb (i.e. fewer large air holes) and was more prone to settling into the tray. Whereas the folded version held its rounded shape a bit more (so spread less in the tin) and had larger air holes. So overall, you can do EITHER method and you’ll get delicious results, it just depends on if you have time to do the folds or not (and depends on if you really want that open crumb).

Overnight Fridge-Rest or Same Day Bake?

Once the dough has had its 4 hours of bulk rising and is plopped into the tray, you can let it prove at room temp and bake the same day OR you can leave it in the fridge overnight. Again, this can be a preference due to timing but also comes down to flavour. If you prefer a more sour-tasting bread, chilling the dough overnight really helps those flavours develop. If you don’t care so much for that flavour and want the bread TODAY, no fridge-rest needed.

unbaked sourdough focaccia dough with rosemery

One set of Coil Folds

One ‘set’ of coil folds

Sourdough Focaccia (No-Knead)

Sourdough Focaccia (No-Knead)

Yield: a 9 x 13-inch focaccia
Prep Time: 6 hours 30 minutes
Cook Time: 25 minutes
Total Time: 6 hours 55 minutes

Ingredients

  • 400g (1 1/2 cups plus 2 tbsp) lukewarm water
  • 1 tbsp granulated sugar
  • 500g (4 cups) white bread flour (strong flour)(see notes for substitutes)
  • 100g (1/2 cup) recently fed sourdough starter (100% hydration)
  • 1 tsp (7g) fine table salt
  • 80ml (1/3 cup) extra virgin olive oil

Instructions

Make the dough:

  1. Combine 385g of the water (i.e. all but 1 tablespoon of the water) and all of the sugar in a large bowl. Mix to combine.
  2. Add the bread flour and mix to form a lumpy dough. Cover (I like to use a bin bag placed over the bowl and clipped at the side, or a shower cap) and leave to rest for 30 minutes.
  3. After 30 minutes, spread the starter over the dough in the bowl. Dimple it in and mix the dough as well as you can in the bowl. I find using my hand, shaped like a claw, with a kind of scooping motion towards the edge of the bowl helpful for this. Once mixed, sprinkle the salt and the reserved 15g (1 tbsp) of water over and mix this in in a similar fashion.

For No-knead bulk rise:

  1. Cover and leave at room temperature for another 4 hours until doubled in size and bubbly (this timing will depend on the weather; my room temp. is generally 22-24°C. Better to go by the increase in volume rather than the suggested time).

OR For Folded bulk rise:

  1. Cover and leave for another 30 minutes at room temperature. After 30 minutes wet your hands and perform a set of coil folds on the dough: coil folding (see video above the recipe card for help) is done by gently lifting the dough up with both (wet) hands cupped underneath, then letting the 'North' edge fold under the dough as you place it back into the bowl. Rotate the bowl 180 degrees so the 'South' edge is now facing 'north'. Lift the dough up again in the same way and let the 'south' edge fold under the dough as you place it back down. Rotate the bowl 90-degrees and then repeat the lifting & lowering for the 'west' and 'east' edges of the dough. This is one 'set' of coil folds.
  2. Cover the dough and leave for another 3.5 hours, performing a set of coil folds every 30 minutes, and covering the dough each time while it rests. The first few coil folds you perform you can be a bit more firm with the dough but as you progress to the later coil folds, try to be gentler so as not to disturb the air in the dough too much.
  3. Straight after your final coil fold, move onto the next step.


Shape:

  1. Drizzle half of the olive oil into a 9 x 13-inch baking tray or roasting dish (I prefer one with high sides but a rimmed baking sheet works). Gently tip the bowl over the tray and coax the dough out as carefully as possible - it should mostly fall out from its own weight. Oil your hands and flip the dough over so that both sides are now covered with a light layer of oil. Use wetted fingertips to very very gently coax the dough into a slight oval shape, trying not to deflate the dough or stretch it too much. It will spread out more as it rises so don't worry about making it reach the edges of the tray.


To Bake the same day:

  1. Leave uncovered in a warm place for 2-5 hours until very puffy - almost doubled in volume - and bubbly. Again this will depend on the temp of your room so will be quicker in warmer months.
  2. When ready to bake, preheat the oven to 220°C fan (430°F) / 240°C non-fan (460°F).
  3. Drizzle the remaining olive oil over the dough and use your fingertips to press down into the dough all over, making deep dimples for the oil to pool in. Sprinkle with some flakey salt, add any other toppings like rosemary sprigs, and bake for 20-25 minutes, rotating the tray halfway through the baking time to ensure an even bake. It should be golden all over with some more well-browned patches.


OR To Bake tomorrow:

  1. Chill the dough overnight (10-12 hours). An hour before you want to bake it, remove from the fridge and leave at room temp to warm up a bit.
  2. When ready to bake, preheat the oven to 220°C fan (430°F) / 240°C non-fan (460°F).
  3. Drizzle the remaining olive oil over the dough and use your fingertips to press down into the dough all over, making deep dimples for the oil to pool in. Sprinkle with some flakey salt, add any other toppings like rosemary sprigs, and bake for 20-25 minutes, rotating the tray halfway through the baking time to ensure an even bake. It should be golden all over with some more well-browned patches.

Tip: Allow to cool before removing from the tray, slicing and eating. If you find the dough is stuck to your tray, use a metal spatula or offset cake spatula to coax it away from the tray (It should be quite a flexible loaf so don't worry if it bends a bit as you do this).

Notes

Substituting flours: you can use up to 250g of wholemeal bread flour in place of white bread flour in this recipe, if you'd like. You can also use plain white flour (all purpose flour) in the loaf, it just won't be as chewy & open-crumbed.

Recently fed starter = your starter should be bubbly and pass the float test.

Have you made this recipe?
I’d love to see how it went! Tag me on instagram @izyhossack and hashtag it #topwithcinnamon so I can have a look & reshare in my stories!

The post Sourdough Focaccia (no-knead) appeared first on Izy Hossack - Top With Cinnamon.

Sesame Pretzel Focaccia with Dijon Beer Cheese.

This pretzel focaccia is seriously changing my life! This bread. Oh my WORD. It’s like a soft pretzel but a million times better.  The sesame pretzelness of this focaccia reminds me so much of my favorite pretzel croissant from City Bakery (which sadly closed! wah!), which was perfectly flakey and also had a few sesame […]

The post Sesame Pretzel Focaccia with Dijon Beer Cheese. appeared first on How Sweet Eats.

This pretzel focaccia is seriously changing my life!

This sesame pretzel focaccia bread is amazing! Almost like a soft pretzel with crispy edges. Serve with a delicious dijon beer cheese.

This bread. Oh my WORD. It’s like a soft pretzel but a million times better. 

pretzel focaccia dough

The sesame pretzelness of this focaccia reminds me so much of my favorite pretzel croissant from City Bakery (which sadly closed! wah!), which was perfectly flakey and also had a few sesame seeds on top. 

There is a (very!) faux version in The Pretty Dish, using puff pastry and it does the trick if you want to make one. 

But now! Now we have this.

OH MY GOSH. 

This sesame pretzel focaccia bread is amazing! Almost like a soft pretzel with crispy edges. Serve with a delicious dijon beer cheese.

This is so unbelievably delicious. You make a focaccia bread as you normally would and then do the whole baking soda + water thing by brushing it on top of the dough. It creates the pretzel-ish top and flavor that we so crave and love. 

This sesame pretzel focaccia bread is amazing! Almost like a soft pretzel with crispy edges. Serve with a delicious dijon beer cheese.

And of course! The beer cheese! Dijon beer cheese to be exact.

I’ve made tons of beer cheese things on the blog over the years. It’s no secret that I love basically ANYTHING beer cheese.

Making this dip for the focaccia is out of this world. It’s rich and creamy and a bit tangy and so decadent. The pretzel focaccia doesn’t NEED a dip, but it’s deliciousness is definitely enhanced by this one. 

When you get a soft pretzel and you have to choose between mustard and cheese dip, I can NEVER choose. I always want both.

So I made both. Into one! 

This sesame pretzel focaccia bread is amazing! Almost like a soft pretzel with crispy edges. Serve with a delicious dijon beer cheese.

Cheese and mustard and probably two of my favorite things in the whole world, so combining them into a dip is just UNREAL. The taste is fantastic. It almost reminds me of a croque monsier in a weird way since it has mustard and cheese sauce. And that’s always a good thing!

I’m not sure I can even fully report how much Eddie loves the focaccia. You know how they say there are two types of people – those who like to eat in moderation and those who prefer to splurge all in one day? Eddie is the latter and usually saves indulgent treats for the weekends. But as I tested this recipe during the week, he couldn’t stop eating the bread and was freaking out over just how GOOD it is. The temptation was strong. 

This sesame pretzel focaccia bread is amazing! Almost like a soft pretzel with crispy edges. Serve with a delicious dijon beer cheese.

Even though I’m not a serious bread person (I could take it or leave it, aside from a good piece of sourdough), serving this in the focaccia sticks is my desired way to eat. But I did see suggestions to use it to make a sandwich and that just sounds fabulous. I admit that I didn’t even try it, because it disappears like crazy every time I make it. 

I hope the same happens for you!

This sesame pretzel focaccia bread is amazing! Almost like a soft pretzel with crispy edges. Serve with a delicious dijon beer cheese.

Pretzel Focaccia with Dijon Beer Cheese

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Pretzel Focaccia with Dijon Beer Cheese

This sesame pretzel focaccia bread is amazing! Almost like a soft pretzel with crispy edges. Serve with a delicious dijon beer cheese.
Course bread
Cuisine American
Prep Time 3 hours
Cook Time 25 minutes
Total Time 3 hours 25 minutes
Servings 8 people
Author How Sweet Eats

Ingredients

  • 6 cups all-purpose flour
  • 1 tablespoon kosher salt
  • 1 packet (2 ¼ teaspoons) active dry yeast
  • 3 cups warm water
  • 6 tablespoons melted butter
  • 2 tablespoons canola or vegetable oil
  • 2 tablespoons baking soda
  • ½ cup boiling water
  • flakey sea salt, for topping
  • sesame seeds, for topping

Dijon Beer Cheese

  • 2 tablespoons unsalted butter
  • 2 tablespoons flour
  • 1 cup beer
  • 2 tablespoons dijon mustard
  • 12 ounces freshly grated gouda
  • 2 tablespoons fresh chives

Instructions

  • Stir the flour, salt and yeast together in a large bowl. Slowly add in the warm water while stirring constantly until a dough forms. It will be sticky! Once the lumps are gone and the dough is combined, cover it and place in a warm spot to rise for 1 to 2 hours.
  • Brush an 18x13 inch sheet pan with 2 tablespoons of the melted butter. Drizzle on the oil and brush it all over the pan too. Turn the dough out onto the pan and press it out with your hands until it covers the sheet pan.
  • Place the baking soda in a large bowl. Bring ½ cup water to a boil (I use an electric tea kettle for this) and pour it over the baking soda. It will get foamy - this is why you want to use a bigger bowl that you’d expect.
  • Brush the mixture (you won’t use all of it - reserve it to use later) on the top of the dough. Then place the sheet pan in a warm place and let it rise again for an hour. It will be a little bubbly too.
  • Preheat the oven to 475 degrees F. Brush the top of the dough again with the baking soda mixture. Bake the bread for 10 minutes. Remove the pan and brush it with the remaining melted butter. Sprinkle with the flaked salt and sesame seeds. Return the pan to the oven and bake for another 10 to 15 minutes, until the top is golden brown (like a soft pretzel!) and the edges are a bit crisp.
  • Let the bread cool slightly (you can make the beer cheese while it cools!) before slicing it. Serve!

Dijon Beer Cheese

  • To make the beer cheese sauce, heat a small saucepan over medium heat and add butter. Once sizzling, whisk in flour and stir for 1 to 2 minutes until golden and fragrant and bubbly. Stir in beer, whisking well to combine.
  • Reduce heat to low and add cheese, stirring until totally melted and smooth. Whisk in the dijon. Serve immediately with a sprinkling of chives.

Notes

slightly adapted from bon appetit and real simple

This sesame pretzel focaccia bread is amazing! Almost like a soft pretzel with crispy edges. Serve with a delicious dijon beer cheese.

Puhlease make this your weekend plan.

The post Sesame Pretzel Focaccia with Dijon Beer Cheese. appeared first on How Sweet Eats.

Stuffed Fig Focaccia Bread.

This is how we make the best fig focaccia bread! Remember earlier this year when I made that caramelized onion focaccia?! It’s one of my favorite recipes of this year because it’s JUST SO GOOD. And I’ve been dying to make something else similar. See? That’s what happens to me. It’s how so many of […]

The post Stuffed Fig Focaccia Bread. appeared first on How Sweet Eats.

This is how we make the best fig focaccia bread!

This stuffed fig focaccia bread is such an amazing way to use figs! Golden, toasty, salted focaccia studded with fig jewels. It's delicious and pretty!

Remember earlier this year when I made that caramelized onion focaccia?! It’s one of my favorite recipes of this year because it’s JUST SO GOOD.

And I’ve been dying to make something else similar.

See? That’s what happens to me. It’s how so many of my recipes are born. I make something… and I love it. And I decide that because I love it so much, I should try to recreate it in another form.

Honestly, it barely works out. Usually the thing I make/do is never as good as the original that I love the most.

But! In this case?

WE HAVE A WINNER.

fresh figs

Figs on focaccia bread. If you’re a freak for alliteration like I am, enjoy. 

Not only does this focaccia bread have tons of fresh rosemary and garlic and lots of sliced figs, it also has prosciutto wrapped blue cheese stuffed figs.

YES.

Let me say that again. Prosciutto wrapped. Blue cheese stuffed. FIGS.

The prosciutto wrapped blue cheese stuffed figs aren’t a crazy phenomenon here. I’ve made a similar version before for my summer cheese plate (you still have time to make that happen, FYI!) and they are always a favorite appetizer when fig season rolls around.

But putting said prosciutto wrapped blue cheese stuffed figs ON something? Or IN something?

I mean, that’s a mouthful. Literally. 

focaccia dough

So I did it. And it works! 

The key is to just make a few of the stuffed figs. Kind of “stud” your bread with the figs. That means that now, it’s prosciutto wrapped blue cheese stuffed fig studded focaccia.

Aren’t you so glad I didn’t name the entire recipe that above?

Once baked, the stuffed figs work their magic in the bread. The prosciutto that is exposed crisps up, as expected. The inside of the fig and blue cheese gets a little jammy, almost like you spread actual fig jam on the bread. 

Speaking of that, you could totally spread fig jam on the bread if you wanted. I wouldn’t turn it down. 

fig focaccia dough

This is an appetizer. Or a pizza. Or a side dish. It’s actually whatever you want it to be. Where does it fit into your life?

For me, it fits right in with a late summer greens salad. So good.

For Eddie, it’s basically a starter to a larger meal. Shocking, right?

This stuffed fig focaccia bread is such an amazing way to use figs! Golden, toasty, salted focaccia studded with fig jewels. It's delicious and pretty!

Stuffed Fig Focaccia Bread

Stuffed Fig Focaccia Bread

This stuffed fig focaccia bread is such an amazing way to use figs! Golden, toasty, salted focaccia studded with fig jewels. It’s delicious and pretty!

  • 1 3/4 cups warm water
  • 2 1/4 teaspoons active dry yeast
  • 1 tablespoon honey
  • 5 cups all-purpose flour, (plus more for your workspace)
  • 2 teaspoons garlic powder
  • 2 teaspoons kosher salt
  • 1 cup extra virgin olive oil
  • 6 whole fresh figs, (sliced)
  • 6 whole fresh figs
  • 2 to 3 ounces blue cheese, (plus more for sprinkling)
  • 3 slices prosciutto
  • 4 tablespoons chopped fresh rosemary, (plus more for garnish)
  • pinch of flaked sea salt
  1. In a bowl, stir together the water, yeast and honey. Let it sit for 10 to 15 minutes until foamy.
  2. In the bowl of your stand mixer, add the flour, 1 tablespoon of salt, 1/2 cup of olive oil and the yeast mixture. Stir, using the dough hook, until the mixture comes together. Knead it on medium-low speed for 5 to 6 minutes. If it’s super sticky, sprinkle in a bit of extra flour. You want it to be silky!
  3. Put the dough in an oiled bowl and cover it. Place it in a warm spot and let it rise for 1 hour, or until it’s doubled in size.
  4. After it’s doubled, place the remaining oil in a 15 1/2 x 10 inch jelly roll sheet pan. Place the dough in the sheet pan and turn it over to cover it in the oil once, then press and spread it until it fits in the pan (or almost fits in the pan. it’s going to rise again!). While doing this, press to make finger marks in the dough so it looks like traditional focaccia. Cover the sheet pan and place the dough back in a warm place to rise for another hour.
  5. Preheat the oven to 425 degrees Slice the fresh figs. To stuff the whole figs, take each fig and slice and “x” in the bottom center to create a little opening. Press about 1/2 an ounce of goat cheese inside the center of the fig. Wrap each fig with half a slice of prosciutto.prosciutto is crispy on the outside.
  6. Press the slice figs and the stuffed figs into the focaccia bread dough. Sprinkle with fresh rosemary and flaked salt. Bake the focaccia for 20 to 25 minutes, or until golden on top and crunchy on the edges. Let cool slightly before slicing!

This stuffed fig focaccia bread is such an amazing way to use figs! Golden, toasty, salted focaccia studded with fig jewels. It's delicious and pretty!

This is a ridic amount of flavor. Because figs. And cheese!

The post Stuffed Fig Focaccia Bread. appeared first on How Sweet Eats.