Lemon Poppy Seed Scones

I am always up for a good scone. Some of my favorites include: strawberry, blueberry, raspberry, and cranberry orange. I also love these Lemon Poppy Seed Scones. Lemon is always a good idea! This scone recipe is really simple, so if you haven’t m…

I am always up for a good scone. Some of my favorites include: strawberry, blueberry, raspberry, and cranberry orange. I also love these Lemon Poppy Seed Scones. Lemon is always a good idea! This scone recipe is really simple, so if you haven’t made scones before, don’t be afraid. They come together in no time…

Madeleine Kamman’s White Chocolate-Chartreuse Bavarian

I don’t remember the first time I made this dessert, but I certainly remember being wowed by its flavors, and the creator of it, Madeleine Kamman. (Who I’ll get to in a minute…) I’d been making it for years and it’s a wonderful way to use white chocolate, which pairs remarkably well with dark chocolate, but also goes nicely with everything from berries and lemon,…

I don’t remember the first time I made this dessert, but I certainly remember being wowed by its flavors, and the creator of it, Madeleine Kamman. (Who I’ll get to in a minute…) I’d been making it for years and it’s a wonderful way to use white chocolate, which pairs remarkably well with dark chocolate, but also goes nicely with everything from berries and lemon, and caramelizes beautifully, which can be used in cakes, sorbets, and ice cream. (I learned how to make it at the Valrhona Chocolate School, and it’s become so popular that the company now sells it by the bar.)

What can’t white chocolate do?

Well, it can’t replace chocolate because it’s not chocolate. Milk chocolate technically isn’t chocolate; it’s chocolate with milk added. On a similar note, I’ve only had Home Fries served to me at diners, not at home. And I’m still perplexed that we call it Banana Bread, because some people have told me that Cornbread, if made with a few teaspoons of sugar, isn’t bread, it’s cake. Yes, some insist that white chocolate “…isn’t chocolate!” but herb tea, as it’s commonly called in the U.S., has no tea in it. So if you’ve ever sipped a cup of “chamomile tea” (or even if you haven’t), you are welcome to enjoy white chocolate!

Continue Reading Madeleine Kamman’s White Chocolate-Chartreuse Bavarian...

Cranberry Orange Scones

Cranberry and orange are a match made in heaven, especially during the holiday season. I love making cranberry orange bread, muffins, and Cranberry Orange Scones. These bakery style Cranberry Orange Scones are such a treat! The scones are soft, tender,…

Cranberry and orange are a match made in heaven, especially during the holiday season. I love making cranberry orange bread, muffins, and Cranberry Orange Scones. These bakery style Cranberry Orange Scones are such a treat! The scones are soft, tender, and dotted with juicy dried cranberries. There is a hint of orange zest in the…

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Biscoff Pumpkin Pie

I am normally not a huge pumpkin pie person, unless it is our Salted Caramel Pumpkin Pie. That one is the BEST! I always savor every bite. Well, there is a new pumpkin pie in town that has stole my heart…this Biscoff Pumpkin Pie. You HAVE to try …

I am normally not a huge pumpkin pie person, unless it is our Salted Caramel Pumpkin Pie. That one is the BEST! I always savor every bite. Well, there is a new pumpkin pie in town that has stole my heart…this Biscoff Pumpkin Pie. You HAVE to try it. It is creamy, dreamy, and divine!…

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Ranch Drop Biscuits

Add ranch seasoning to your biscuit dough for an extra punch of flavor! These Ranch Drop Biscuits are the perfect side for a bowl of soup.

The post Ranch Drop Biscuits appeared first on Budget Bytes.

If you haven’t heard, it’s soup season. ;) And what’s better to go with a warm and cozy bowl of soup than a warm and tender drop biscuit? Drop biscuits are incredibly easy and you can change up the flavors to go with your meal. This week I used my homemade ranch seasoning to make a really simple ranch-flavored drop biscuit. They’re a little tangy, a little herby, and absolutely delicious! I know you’re going to love them, so make sure to put these Ranch Drop Biscuits on your menu.

Side view of a stack of ranch drop biscuits on a plate

What Are Drop Biscuits?

Drop biscuits are a really simple type of quickbread with a free-form dough that is just dropped by the spoonful onto a baking sheet rather than being rolled and cut like a traditional biscuit. They have a wonderfully rustic shape that creates tons of nooks and crannies in the top, perfect for brushing with butter.

This particular drop biscuit recipe is even easier because we use heavy cream in place of butter, so there is no need to use a pastry cutter or to do the tedious work of cutting butter into the flour. You just stir, scoop, drop, and bake!

Can I Substitute the Heavy Cream?

Heavy cream is vital to this recipe because the high-fat content of the cream is what replaces the butter that is traditionally used in biscuits. The fat is what keeps the biscuit soft and tender. Without it, your biscuits will be dense and rubbery. Labels can vary from brand to brand, so just look for cream labeled heavy cream, whipping cream, or heavy whipping cream. Any of those types of cream will have an adequate amount of fat to make the biscuits work well.

Use Homemade or Store-Bought Ranch Seasoning

This recipe works great with either a store-bought packet of ranch seasoning or a batch of homemade ranch seasoning. You can use whatever is most convenient for you!

What Else Can I Add?

As mentioned above, you can add all sorts of delicious flavors to drop biscuits. If you want to add even more to these Ranch Drop Biscuits you could stir some fresh sliced green onions or shredded cheddar cheese to the dough (add with the dry ingredients).

Baked ranch drop biscuits on a baking sheet
side view of ranch drop biscuits on a plate

Ranch Drop Biscuits

Add ranch seasoning to your biscuit dough for an extra punch of flavor! These Ranch Drop Biscuits are the perfect side for a bowl of soup.
Total Cost $2.54 recipe / $0.21 each
Prep Time 15 minutes
Cook Time 18 minutes
Total Time 33 minutes
Servings 12 biscuits
Calories 244kcal
Author Beth – Budget Bytes

Ingredients

Homemade Ranch Seasoning*

  • 2 Tbsp buttermilk powder $0.15
  • 1/2 tsp dried parsley $0.05
  • 1/4 tsp dried dill $0.03
  • 1/4 tsp onion powder $0.02
  • 1/8 tsp garlic powder $0.02
  • 1/4 tsp lemon pepper $0.02
  • 1/8 tsp freshly cracked black pepper $0.02

Biscuits

  • 2.25 cups all-purpose flour $0.35
  • 1 tsp salt $0.05
  • 1 Tbsp baking powder $0.06
  • 1 tsp sugar $0.02
  • 1 pint heavy cream $1.55
  • 2 Tbsp butter (for topping, optional) $0.20

Instructions

  • Preheat the oven to 400ºF. In a small bowl, combine the ingredients for the ranch seasoning (buttermilk powder, parsley, dill, onion powder, garlic powder, lemon pepper, black pepper). Set one teaspoon of the ranch seasoning aside to mix with melted butter and brush over the finished biscuits.
  • In a large bowl, combine the flour, sugar, salt, baking powder, and the remaining ranch seasoning (if you do not plan to brush melted butter over your baked biscuits, just us all of the ranch seasoning in the biscuit batter). Make sure the dry ingredients are evenly combined.
  • Add the heavy cream to the dry ingredients and stir until a sticky batter forms. Make sure no dry flour is left on the bottom of the bowl.
  • Spoon the batter onto a parchment lined baking sheet in about ¼ cup dollops. The batter does not need to be shaped or smoothed in any way. You should get about 12 biscuits.
  • Bake the biscuits for about 18 minutes, or until they are puffed and golden brown on top.
  • After baking, melt the butter in a small dish, then stir in the reserved ranch seasoning. Brush the ranch butter over the top of the biscuits just before serving.

Notes

*You can use one packet of store-bought ranch seasoning in place of the seasoning ingredients listed in the recipe.

Nutrition

Serving: 1biscuit | Calories: 244kcal | Carbohydrates: 20g | Protein: 4g | Fat: 17g | Sodium: 337mg | Fiber: 1g
Drop biscuits on a round plate, garnished with parsley

How to Make Ranch Drop Biscuits – Step by Step Photos

Ranch seasoning in a bowl

Preheat the oven to 400ºF. If you’re using homemade ranch seasoning, combine the ingredients for the seasoning in a bowl (2 Tbsp buttermilk powder, ½ tsp dried parsley, ¼ tsp dried dill, ¼ tsp onion powder, ⅛ tsp garlic powder, ¼ tsp lemon pepper, ⅛ tsp black pepper). Whether using a homemade ranch seasoning or store-bought, set aside 1 tsp of the seasoning to combine with melted butter to be brushed over the biscuits after baking.

drop biscuit dry ingredients in a bowl

Combine 2.25 cups all-purpose flour, 1 tsp sugar, 1 tsp salt, 1 Tbsp baking powder, and the remaining ranch seasoning in a bowl. Stir until very well combined. If you don’t plan to brush melted butter over the biscuits after baking, you can just add all of the ranch seasoning at this time.

heavy cream being poured into the dry ingredients

Add one pint of heavy cream into the bowl of dry ingredients.

drop biscuit dough

Stir the heavy cream into the dry ingredients until it forms a shaggy ball of dough. It might be very sticky and that’s okay.

portioned biscuits on the baking sheet

Scoop and drop the dough into 12 portions onto a parchment-lined baking sheet (about ¼ cup each). If they’re a little uneven in shape or size, just pinch some off of one and press it onto another. The free-form shape makes them very forgiving! The more texture the better.

baked drop biscuits on a baking sheet

Bake the ranch drop biscuits in the preheated 400ºF for about 18 minutes, or until they’re puffed up and golden brown on the edges.

melted butter with ranch seasoning

Melt 2 Tbsp butter and then stir in the reserved teaspoon of ranch seasoning.

ranch butter being brushed over drop biscuits

Brush the ranch butter over the biscuits just before serving!

side view of ranch drop biscuits on a plate

I garnished with a little chopped parsley for the photos, but it’s not needed for flavor. :)

Love Drop Biscuits? Try These Other Flavors

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Pumpkin Scones

I love a GOOD scone. Strawberry, blueberry, chocolate chip, and peach scones are a few of my favorites, they are all so delicious. But during the fall months, I am all about Pumpkin Scones. The pumpkin scones are soft, moist, and spiced with the perfec…

I love a GOOD scone. Strawberry, blueberry, chocolate chip, and peach scones are a few of my favorites, they are all so delicious. But during the fall months, I am all about Pumpkin Scones. The pumpkin scones are soft, moist, and spiced with the perfect mixture of cinnamon, nutmeg, ginger, and cloves. The scones also…

The post Pumpkin Scones appeared first on Two Peas & Their Pod.

One Pot Creamy Mushroom Pasta

This creamy mushroom pasta is a rich, umami-filled delight that cooks quickly and easily in one pot. The perfect dinner for busy nights.

The post One Pot Creamy Mushroom Pasta appeared first on Budget Bytes.

Where are all of my one-pot pasta lovers at? This one is for you! This One Pot Creamy Mushroom Pasta is a super-rich, umami-filled delight that is, as always, easily prepared in one pot. It’s the perfect comfort at the end of a long tiring work day. And don’t forget to make a little garlic bread to serve on the side. ;)

A fork twirling creamy mushroom pasta on a plate

What Kind of Mushrooms to Use

I like baby bella mushrooms for this pasta because they are not too expensive and they have a nice deep color that adds a lot to the plate. You can use white button mushrooms if needed, but they do have a slightly more mild flavor. You could also use full-sized portobello mushrooms, just slice them into smaller pieces before sautéing.

Can I Substitute the Heavy Cream?

I use heavy cream in this recipe which creates a super-rich and luscious sauce for the pasta. Because it’s so thick, it also helps the Parmesan to melt into the sauce without clumping. Milk, which has a much higher water content, will produce a thinner sauce and you may have difficulty getting the Parmesan to melt in instead of clumping. One way I’ve gotten around this in the past is to use a combination of milk and cream cheese. The cream cheese both emulsifies the Parmesan and thickens the sauce (see how the technique is used in Creamy Sun-Dried Tomato Pasta).

What Else Can I Add?

This creamy mushroom pasta is kind of a simple pleasure, but you can add more if you’re craving something more complex. Try adding in a few handfuls of fresh spinach toward the end for a little color. You could also top the pasta with some grilled chicken for a little more oomph.

What Kind of Pot to Use

I used a 3-quart deep skillet for this pasta, but you can use any pot or Dutch oven that has a wide bottom and a lid. Make sure to use a burner on your stovetop that is similar in size to the bottom of your pot or skillet to ensure even heating.

TIPS FOR COOKING ONE POT PASTAS:

Getting one pot pasta just right can take some practice, so if you find you’re having trouble, here are a few tips:

  • Stir every few minutes to keep the pasta from sticking to the bottom of the pot. Replace the lid each time to prevent excessive evaporation.
  • Make sure the pasta is simmering the whole time. If the liquid is not simmering, the pasta will not cook. The temperature setting needed to maintain a simmer can vary depending on your stove top and cookware.
  • Use heavy cookware. Skillets and pots that are thin on the bottom don’t heat evenly and do not yield good results with one pot pastas because some areas of the pot will be simmering, while other areas are not.
  • Keep the lid in place at all times when not stirring. This holds in the steam and helps the pasta cook more evenly.
  • Watch the pasta. One pot pastas are a little like riding a bike. You have to observe and adjust as you go. If the liquid is almost all absorbed before the pasta is tender, add a little more water. If the pasta is almost tender, but there is still a lot of liquid, allow it to simmer without a lid for the last couple of minutes.
pasta twirled around tongs in the skillet
Close up of pasta being twirled around the tongs in the skillet

One Pot Creamy Mushroom Pasta

This creamy mushroom pasta is a rich, umami-filled delight that cooks quickly and easily in one pot. The perfect dinner for busy nights.
Total Cost $3.74 recipe / $0.94 serving
Prep Time 10 minutes
Cook Time 20 minutes
Total Time 30 minutes
Servings 4
Calories 388kcal
Author Beth – Budget Bytes

Ingredients

  • 4 cloves garlic $0.32
  • 8 oz. baby bella mushrooms $1.49
  • 2 Tbsp butter $0.20
  • 1/8 tsp salt $0.01
  • 1/8 tsp freshly cracked pepper $0.02
  • 8 oz. fettuccine $0.67
  • 2.5 cups vegetable broth $0.33
  • 1/3 cup heavy cream $0.26
  • 1/4 cup grated Parmesan $0.44

Instructions

  • Mince the garlic and slice the mushrooms.
  • Add the butter and garlic to a deep skillet and sauté over medium heat for one minute. Add the sliced mushrooms, salt, and pepper, and continue to sauté until the mushrooms have softened, all of their moisture has evaporated from the skillet, and the edges are beginning to brown.
  • Add the fettuccine to the skillet along with the vegetable broth and stir to combine. It's okay if the broth doesn't fully submerge the pasta.
  • Place a lid on the skillet, turn the heat up to medium-high, and allow the broth to come up to a boil. When it reaches a boil, give the pasta a quick stir, replace the lid, then turn the heat down to medium-low.
  • Continue to let the pasta simmer in the broth for about 10 minutes, stirring occasionally (always replacing the lid), or until the pasta is tender. There should be a little saucy liquid left in the bottom of the skillet.
  • Add the heavy cream to the skillet and stir to combine. Turn the heat off then add the Parmesan and continue to stir the pasta until the Parmesan is melted. Give the pasta a taste and add salt or pepper if needed. Serve immediately.

Nutrition

Serving: 1serving | Calories: 388kcal | Carbohydrates: 47g | Protein: 13g | Fat: 17g | Sodium: 829mg | Fiber: 2g
Overhead view of creamy mushroom pasta on a plate with a fork

How to Make One Pot Creamy Mushroom Pasta – Step by Step Photos

Sliced mushrooms on a cutting board

Mince four cloves of garlic and slice 8 oz. baby bella mushrooms.

Garlic and butter in the skillet

Add the garlic and butter to your skillet or pot and sauté over medium heat for about one minute.

Sautéed mushrooms in the skillet

Add the mushrooms to the skillet along with a pinch of salt and pepper. Continue to sauté until the mushrooms have released all of their liquid, it has evaporated from the bottom of the skillet, and the mushrooms begin to turn golden brown on the edges.

fettuccine in the skillet, broth being poured in

Add 8 oz. fettuccine to the skillet along with 2.5 cups of vegetable broth. Stir to combine. It’s okay if the pasta is not fully submerged. Place a lid on the pot, turn the heat up to medium-high, and allow the broth to come up to a boil.

Cooked Pasta being pulled to the side with a pasta spoon

When the broth reaches a full boil, give the pasta a quick stir to loosen any noodles that may have stuck to the bottom. Replace the lid, turn the heat down to low, or just above low, so that the broth maintains a simmer. Simmer the noodles, stirring occasionally and replacing the lid each time, until the pasta is tender. There should be a small amount of gravy-like broth on the bottom of the skillet.

heavy cream being poured into the skillet

Add ⅓ cup heavy cream to the pasta and stir to combine.

Parmesan being sprinkled over the pasta

Turn the heat under the skillet off. Add ¼ cup grated Parmesan to the pasta and toss to combine. The residual heat from the pasta should begin to melt the Parmesan.

Finished one pot creamy mushroom pasta in the skillet

Give the pasta a taste and adjust the salt or pepper to your liking. I usually like to add a little freshly cracked black pepper on top for a little pop!

Pasta being twirled around tongs in the skillet

Try These Other Creamy One Pot Pasta Recipes

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Whipped White Russian

A quick recipe and everything you need to know for how to make a White Russian! This classic cocktail combines vodka, Kahlua and cream. We whipped some of the cream and added it to the top for a whipped White Russian. It’s a fantastic cocktail an…

A quick recipe and everything you need to know for how to make a White Russian! This classic cocktail combines vodka, Kahlua and cream. We whipped some of the cream and added it to the top for a whipped White Russian. It’s a fantastic cocktail and simple to make. Made popular by the 90’s cult […]

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Chocolate Hazelnut Tart

I’m back on the wagon of tackling the recipes in the bulging files of recipes that I’ve been collecting and hanging on to for the past thirty years. Many pre-date the internet and were from food magazines (made of paper) that I subscribed to. A surprising number of the savory recipes have the words “adobo” or “chipotle,” and “pork” in the title, so if I ever…

I’m back on the wagon of tackling the recipes in the bulging files of recipes that I’ve been collecting and hanging on to for the past thirty years. Many pre-date the internet and were from food magazines (made of paper) that I subscribed to. A surprising number of the savory recipes have the words “adobo” or “chipotle,” and “pork” in the title, so if I ever want to write a book of well-seasoned pork recipes, I’ve got plenty of inspiration.

This one is from Gourmet magazine way back in 2004, a few years before they ceased publishing. I knew people in the test kitchen at Gourmet and they thoroughly tested their recipes, so you know they’re going to work. Gourmet was “modernized” under its last editor, Ruth Reichl, but the test kitchen remained a constant; she knew the value of a solid recipe and good testers. She also knew the appeal of a great photo and Romulo Yanes, who recently passed away, created many of the great images that Gourmet was known for.

Many questioned why Condé Nast killed Gourmet but not Bon Appétit, but the subscription numbers were more favorable for the latter, which didn’t end well, and is now undergoing another revamp. I, for one, am happy that there hasn’t been that much turnover here at the blog, but I should probably shake things up here at some point, too.

Continue Reading Chocolate Hazelnut Tart...

Easy Lemon Cream Pie

This sweet and creamy cloud-like lemon cream pie is an easy summer dessert that can be made completely no-bake, if needed.

The post Easy Lemon Cream Pie appeared first on Budget Bytes.

I set out this week to make some no-churn lemon ice cream, but at the last minute, I was like, “I really don’t want to wait for it to freeze…” so I made it into a pie instead. The filling for this super easy Lemon Cream Pie is the same simple combo as no-churn ice cream: sweetened condensed milk + heavy whipping cream + whatever flavors or add-ins you want. It creates a sweet and creamy cloud-like mixture that I could just eat up with a spoon (or in a pie crust 😄).

This simple pie has so many options, so make sure you keep reading to find out a couple of quick ways you can change it up and make it your own.

Overhead view of a lemon cream pie on black tile with lemons on the side

Pie Crust Options

Graham Cracker Crust – I made a simple pie crust out of vanilla wafers to play on the whole vanilla-lemon theme of the pie, but you can easily use the exact same method with graham crackers instead.

No-Bake – I baked my crust for a brief 10 minutes to make it more solid, but baking is not 100% necessary. You can make the pie completely no-bake if needed, the crust will just be a little more crumbly.

Store-Bought – To make this pie faster and easier, you can use any type of store-bought crust that you like. If it’s a traditional pie crust, you’ll want to pre-bake and cool it before adding the lemon-cream filling. For graham cracker crusts, just fill and refrigerate!

What Kind of Dish to Use

This recipe fills a standard 9-inch pie plate. BUT you can also make this into lemon cream squares by using an 8×8 or 9×9-inch square baking dish instead. If using a square dish, I suggest only pressing the crust into the bottom and not up the sides as you would with a pie plate.

Side view of a slice of lemon cream pie being lifted from the pie plate

Freezer-Friendly

As I mentioned in the introduction, the filling for this pie is actually exactly the same as no-churn ice cream. For that reason, this lemon cream pie is very freezer-friendly. You can eat it frozen, like an ice cream pie, or just store your leftover slices in the freezer (for a couple of months). If you do plan to consume your pie frozen, I suggest skipping the baking step for the crust below because it will be easier to cut when frozen if the crust isn’t quite as solid.

Do I Need to Use Fresh Lemons?

I consider fresh lemons to be mandatory for this recipe, not because of the juice but because of the zest. A lot of the lemon flavor in this pie comes from the zest itself. Without the zest the pie will be nice and tart from the juice but without a vibrant lemon flavor.

Can I Use Prepared Whipped Topping?

Yes, if you don’t want to whip your own heavy cream (it really only takes three minutes with a hand mixer), you can use 2 cups of store-bought whipped topping. But homemade will always taste better. 😉

a piece of lemon cream pie on a plate with a fork on the plate
Overhead view of a sliced lemon cream pie with lemons on the sides

Easy Lemon Cream Pie

This sweet and creamy cloud-like lemon cream pie is an easy summer dessert that can be made completely no-bake, if needed.
Total Cost $4.26 recipe / $0.53 serving
Prep Time 20 minutes
Cook Time 10 minutes
Refrigerate Time 2 hours
Servings 8 slices
Calories 462kcal
Author Beth – Budget Bytes

Ingredients

Pie Crust*

  • 1.5 cups crushed vanilla wafers $0.83
  • 6 Tbsp butter, melted $0.54
  • 2 Tbsp sugar $0.04

Lemon Cream Filling

  • 1 14oz. can sweetened condensed milk $1.25
  • 3 lemons $1.54
  • 1 tsp vanilla extract $0.28
  • 1 cup heavy whipping cream $0.78

Instructions

  • Preheat the oven to 350ºF. Use a food processor or rolling pin to crush the vanilla wafers into very fine, even crumbs. Add the melted butter and sugar and stir until everything is very well combined.
  • Press the butter crumb mixture into a 9-inch pie plate and use a flat bottomed glass to compress the mixture until solid. Bake the crust for 10 minutes in the preheated oven. After baking, transfer the crust to the refrigerator to cool.
  • Zest and juice the lemons. You'll need ½ cup lemon juice and 1 Tbsp zest. Slice any leftover unjuiced portions of the lemon to use as garnishes.
  • Add the sweetened condensed milk to a bowl along with the lemon juice, lemon zest, and vanilla extract. Whisk until everything is well combined.
  • In a separate bowl, whip 1 cup heavy whipping cream until it forms stiff peaks.
  • Add ¼ of the lemon and sweetened condensed milk mixture to the whipped cream and gently fold until combined. Repeat with ¼ of the lemon mixture at a time until all of it has been folded into the whipped cream.
  • Pour the lemon cream filling into the cooled pie crust and refrigerate until completely chilled (about two hours). Slice into 8 pieces and serve.

Notes

*For a softer crust, just press the filling into the pie plate without baking. You can use either vanilla wafers OR graham crackers for this pie crust. You can use any prepared store-bought crust in place of the crust recipe listed here. 

Nutrition

Serving: 1slice | Calories: 462kcal | Carbohydrates: 49g | Protein: 6g | Fat: 28g | Sodium: 244mg | Fiber: 1g
Overhead view of a sliced lemon cream pie with lemons on the sides

How to Make Lemon Cream Pie – Step by Step Photos

Vanilla wafer crust ingredients in the food processor

Preheat the oven to 350ºF. You’ll need 1.5 cups of vanilla wafer (or graham cracker) crumbs for the crust. Use either a food processor or a rolling pin to crush the wafers, making sure the crumb is very fine and even. Add 2 Tbsp sugar and 6 Tbsp melted butter.

vanilla wafer crust mixed in the food processor

Stir (or pulse in the food processor) until the butter, sugar, and crumbs are well combined.

Vanilla wafer crust being pressed into the pie plate with a glass

Press the crumb mixture into a 9-inch pie plate and use a flat bottomed glass to really compress the mixture. Bake the crust in the preheated oven for 10 minutes (this helps solidify the crust), then transfer to the refrigerator to cool.

Zested and juiced lemons

Next, zest and juice the lemons. You’ll need ½ cup lemon juice and about 1 Tbsp zest. That’s about 2-3 lemons worth of juice and 1 lemon worth of zest. If you have any leftover lemon that hasn’t been juiced, you can slice it and use it as a garnish for the pie.

sweetened condensed milk with lemon in a bowl with a whisk

Add one 14oz. can of sweetened condensed milk to a bowl and whisk in ½ cup lemon juice, 1 Tbsp lemon zest, and 1 tsp vanilla extract.

Folding condensed milk and whipped cream together

Whip 1 cup of heavy whipping cream until it forms stiff peaks. Add ¼ of the lemon and sweetened condensed milk mixture to the whipped cream and gently fold until combined. Repeat adding ¼ of the lemon mixture at a time, until all of it has been folded into the whipped cream. If you need help with the folding technique, here is a video tutorial on how to fold ingredients together.

finished lemon cream filling

After all of the lemon mixture has been folded into the whipped cream, it should still be very light, fluffy, and creamy.

Filling poured into the pie crust

Pour the lemon cream filling into the pie crust (I had some extra zest so I added that on top, too). Refrigerate until it’s completely chilled (about 2 hours). You can also freeze it if you want it to be more solid.

Side view of a slice of lemon cream pie with a fork

Slice the pie into eight pieces and then serve.

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