Team Cilantro: These 21 Herby-Green Recipes Are for You

Once upon a time, in 2012, I returned home from my first year of college and got a summer job working at a fast food burrito chain. So began my education in the enormous passions of teams Pro-Cilantro and Anti-Cilantro.
They are equally ardent, an…

Once upon a time, in 2012, I returned home from my first year of college and got a summer job working at a fast food burrito chain. So began my education in the enormous passions of teams Pro-Cilantro and Anti-Cilantro.

They are equally ardent, and the herb is one of extremes: Some customers would ask for extra cilantro to be added to their burritos; some would immediately recoil at the sight of the leaves. It's either the world's best herb or...it tastes like feet.

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What to Plant If You’ve Never Grown Anything

Here’s the short answer: Herbs! Even if you’ve never planted anything, but dream of picking fresh produce from your kitchen window sill, a mini plot of herbs is a very good place to give gardening a whirl. It’s low-cost and low-risk: all you need are a…

Here's the short answer: Herbs! Even if you've never planted anything, but dream of picking fresh produce from your kitchen window sill, a mini plot of herbs is a very good place to give gardening a whirl. It's low-cost and low-risk: all you need are a couple of pots to grow in, a bag of soil, and a sunny window. (You already have the will.) Herbs also tend to be compact, quick-to-grow, and useful—which makes them a very good place to start. Plus, think about it: at the end of this, there could be (homegrown) mint-laced summery mojito with your name on it.

Photo by Ty Mecham

Here's what you'll need:

  • Figure out how many herbs you'd like to grow (our suggestion is to begin with 2-3), and get a pot for each. The thing to remember is size: Your pot should be at least two inches wider than the seedling you place in it. If you're starting with seeds, you'll want the pot to be at least six inches wider.
  • Dishes to sit under those pots—you'll want to avoid water stains running all down your sill.
  • A seed starting tray or old ice cube tray (more on that in a bit).
  • Soil and a small amount of pebbles or gravel.
  • Seeds or seedlings (which are baby plants, just a couple of inches tall).

Seeds vs. seedlings:

Seeds

  • Pros: They're extremely rewarding—you get to see the little guy grow from a tiny seed into something you can actually use for cooking. Starting with seeds also gives you a wider selection of herb varieties to grow, and it's less expensive, especially if you're growing many plants. The most common herbs to grow from seed are annual herbs such as basil and dill, however, you can totally get more adventurous with what you pick.
  • Cons: You'll need to be a little patient: It can take a few weeks for a seed to grow into a seedling and then to grow into a plant large enough to harvest.
  • What to try: Basil, mint, dill, and parsley. They'll all grow fairly quickly and easily from seeds, and need similar things—moist soil and lots of sun.

    Seedlings

  • Pros: You already have a plant to start picking from—and now you just have to keep it alive.
  • Cons: They can be more expensive, and you might have to buy multiples in larger trays to get the amount that you want.
  • What to try: You have a lot of freedom here: Herbs that are harder to start from seed or simply take longer to sprout and grow (like woody ones, such as rosemary and thyme) are especially good to buy as seedlings, because the hard work has already gone into sprouting them.
Photo by James Ransom

How to plant:

Many herbs reach high and wide, and naturally those will do best in the ground, but there are plenty that will do just as well in a pot, given the right conditions. First order of business? Fill the pots with a thin layer of gravel. Then:

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How I Turned My One-Bedroom Apartment into an Indoor Garden

After seeing what magic could sprout from sticking scallions in a cup of water (hint: more scallions), I caught the growing bug. Hard.

This is not particularly new—I do have upwards of 20 houseplants and even had a brief stint as an exotic plant caret…

After seeing what magic could sprout from sticking scallions in a cup of water (hint: more scallions), I caught the growing bug. Hard.

This is not particularly new—I do have upwards of 20 houseplants and even had a brief stint as an exotic plant caretaker where I sung tended to boutique succulents all day. It’s just that, well, I’ve never birthed a plant from seed before.

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The Best Ways to Use a Plethora of Parsley

There are so many great conversations on the Hotline—it’s hard to choose a favorite. But we’ll be doing it, once a week, to spread the wealth of our community’s knowledge—and to keep the conversation going.
Today: Parsley is a great he…

There are so many great conversations on the Hotline—it's hard to choose a favorite. But we'll be doing it, once a week, to spread the wealth of our community's knowledge—and to keep the conversation going.

Today: Parsley is a great herb to have in the kitchen—but what do you do with bunches and bunches of it (or even just a single bunch you bought for a recipe, but don't know what else to make with it)? One community member even found themselves with 10 pounds of the stuff; this might not be exactly the situation you're in, but we've got enough parsley recipe ideas below to prepare you just in case. 

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Our Favorite Skillet Seared Steak with Fries and Honey Dijon Aioli!

Steak frites! Steak frites! I hope you don’t have plans set in stone tonight because this should definitely be your Valentine’s Day meal! Perfectly seared steak… crispy, crunchy air fryer fries. HELLO. It’s a dream! The steak – it is so good.  If I’m making actual steaks, I almost always do filets because I’m weird […]

The post Our Favorite Skillet Seared Steak with Fries and Honey Dijon Aioli! appeared first on How Sweet Eats.

Steak frites! Steak frites!

This is our favorite steak frites! Seared skillet steak and crispy fries made in the air fryer, topped with truffle salt, parmesan and herbs!

I hope you don’t have plans set in stone tonight because this should definitely be your Valentine’s Day meal!

Perfectly seared steak… crispy, crunchy air fryer fries. HELLO. It’s a dream!

strip steaks

The steak – it is so good.  If I’m making actual steaks, I almost always do filets because I’m weird about texture, and love the tenderness of them. I don’t like getting any bites of fat or gristle. 

But I also make flank steak often, if we’re doing something like tacos or serving it as fajitas or just with chimichurri

Here, we’re doing strip steaks! My favorite way to prepare these is to sear them in a cast iron skillet in butter. I know that everyone talks about sous vide and reverse searing, but I just always find myself going back to this method. For me, it’s foolproof and easy and just works. It’s also fast. 

It results in super flavorful steak and it’s pretty easy to achieve the doneness level that you’re looking for. Especially after you get used to doing it!

searing steaks

This is how dark my kitchen is. So dark! It’s even the middle of the day in this photo. Whomp whomp.

crispy air fryer fries

This meal. Oh it is SUCH a treat.

I don’t make it often but it’s just SO good when I do. And we all love it, even the kids.

This is our favorite steak frites! Seared skillet steak and crispy fries made in the air fryer, topped with truffle salt, parmesan and herbs!

Okay, the fries!

We are doing air fryer fries today. I love them in the air fryer and a bunch if you have asked for the recipe, so here’s what I do. I’ve been making air fryer fries for years now, ever since I did a recipe for crate and barrel when air fryers first came out. Unlike my dislike for the instant pot, I actually do like the air fryer and think it has a time and a place! 

Fries being one of the places. All of the time. 

crispy air fryer fries with parmesan herb truffle salt

So! 

I do still soak my fries – anywhere from 30 minutes to an hour. I make sure they are totally dry, then I do give them a spritz of olive oil. Place them in a single layer in the air fryer and let those babies air fry!

This is our favorite steak frites! Seared skillet steak and crispy fries made in the air fryer, topped with truffle salt, parmesan and herbs!

Once they come out, sprinkle with salt and they will be SO GOOD. So crispy and crunchy and like actual fries. The key for me is to cut the potatoes as small/thinly as I can, because this way they get extra crisp.

And do not fear! If you don’t have an air fryer or you just don’t feel like dragging it out, I have other fry options here on the blog. Right here you can find my perfect oven fries and right here you can find some legit fried fries

We really enjoy all of these options, it just depends on the mood I’m in, how messy my kitchen is, what else I’m cooking and how much work I feel like doing. You know?!

This is our favorite steak frites! Seared skillet steak and crispy fries made in the air fryer, topped with truffle salt, parmesan and herbs!

Now doesn’t this just look like something we all deserve today? YES.

This is our favorite steak frites! Seared skillet steak and crispy fries made in the air fryer, topped with truffle salt, parmesan and herbs!

Steak Frites

Seared Steak with Truffle Herb Fries

This is our favorite steak frites! Seared skillet steak and crispy fries made in the air fryer, topped with truffle salt, parmesan and herbs!

seared steak

  • 2 strip steaks
  • kosher salt
  • freshly cracked black pepper
  • 3 to 4 tablespoons unsalted butter

truffle herb fries in the air fryer

  • 2 to 3 russet potatoes, (thinly sliced)
  • olive oil for spritzing/brushing
  • 1 teaspoon truffle salt
  • 2 tablespoons chopped fresh parsley
  • 2 tablespoons freshly grated parmesan cheese

honey dijon aioli

  • ⅓ cup mayonnaise
  • 1 garlic clove, (minced)
  • 1 tablespoon dijon mustard
  • 2 teaspoons honey

seared steak

  1. Make sure your steaks sit out at room temperature for about 30 minutes.
  2. Heat a cast iron skillet over medium-high heat – you want it hot! Season the steaks on both sides with the salt and pepper.
  3. Add 2 tablespoons of butter to the hot skillet. It will sizzle and smoke and once it’s all melted, add in the steaks. Cook for 3 minute, until deeply golden, then flip and cook for 3 minutes more. Add in the remaining butter. Once it melts, spoon it over top of the steaks for another 1 to 2 minutes. I like to cook the steaks to about 140-145 degrees (almost medium doneness or medium well). Remove the steaks and let them rest for 10 to 15 minutes before slicing.

truffle herb fries in the air fryer

  1. Place the sliced potatoes in a large bowl and cover with cold water. Let the potatoes sit in the water for 30 to 60 minutes. Remove the potatoes and place them on kitchen towels – you want them completely dry! Pat them as dry as you can!
  2. Preheat your air fryer to 375 degrees F. Place the potatoes on a baking sheet and spray or brush with olive oil. Place the fries in a single layer in your air fryer (you might have to do 2 batches!). Cook for 12 minutes, then gently flip the fries and cook for 5 to 6 minutes more.
  3. Stir together the parsley and parmesan cheese. When the fries are done, place them on a plate or a sheet of parchment paper and sprinkle all over with the truffle salt immediately. Sprinkle with the herbs and parmesan mixture. Serve with the aioli.

    If you do 2 batches, or if the fries are done before the steak, you can stick these in a 200 degree F oven until ready to eat!

honey dijon aioli

  1. Whisk ingredients together until combined.

This is our favorite steak frites! Seared skillet steak and crispy fries made in the air fryer, topped with truffle salt, parmesan and herbs!

The happiest.

The post Our Favorite Skillet Seared Steak with Fries and Honey Dijon Aioli! appeared first on How Sweet Eats.

The Best Thyme Substitutes for All Your Dishes, Savory & Sweet

Have you ever heard that folk ballad, “Scarborough Fair”? You know, the one that lists a bunch of herbs in the middle of every verse: parsley, sage, rosemary, and thyme? Though it was popularized in the 1960s by singer-songwriter duo, Simon & Garfu…

Have you ever heard that folk ballad, "Scarborough Fair"? You know, the one that lists a bunch of herbs in the middle of every verse: parsley, sage, rosemary, and thyme? Though it was popularized in the 1960s by singer-songwriter duo, Simon & Garfunkel, the song has roots in Medieval England; it's named after a big open-air market that took place in Scarborough, a town outside of Yorkshire, in Northern England. At the fair, all sorts of merchants, farmers, entertainers, and visitors would gather for food, drink, revelry, and, yes, stocking up on herbs.

Back then, herbs were prized for their numerous purported medicinal and healing powers: parsley, for settling the stomach and curing toothaches; sage, to treat epilepsy, liver failure, and fevers; rosemary, for everything from cleaning teeth to warding off evil spirits. Thyme, the most powerful of them all, was long associated with courage, bravery, and strength on the battlefield; it was known to be an antidote to poison, a preventer of the plague, and a lot more.

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Honeycrisp Galette with Cheddar Crust and Thyme Butter.

This apple cheddar galette is giving me LIFE.  Yessss I know I’m going over the top with apples. But can you blame me? The best of the best are in season and to make them into almost-pie is the first step. If you have a copy of my first book, Seriously Delish, then you know […]

The post Honeycrisp Galette with Cheddar Crust and Thyme Butter. appeared first on How Sweet Eats.

This apple cheddar galette is giving me LIFE. 

This apple cheddar galette is made with honeycrisp apples, set in a cheddar herb crust and brushed with thyme butter! So delicious and perfect for fall.

Yessss I know I’m going over the top with apples. But can you blame me?

The best of the best are in season and to make them into almost-pie is the first step.

unbaked apple galette

If you have a copy of my first book, Seriously Delish, then you know that I have a white cheddar apple cobbler in there. Or crumble! Maybe it’s a crumble.

Whatever it is, it’s fantastic and it’s one of the first recipes that got my family on board with the whole apple + cheddar combo.

I know that a lot of you have enjoyed the combo for ages. That there hasn’t been an apple pie slice served without cheddar cheese. But not here! 

This apple cheddar galette is made with honeycrisp apples, set in a cheddar herb crust and brushed with thyme butter! So delicious and perfect for fall.

At least, not in that way. Apples have always been one of my favorite snacks so it wasn’t unusual for me to have an apple AND cheddar on a plate as a snack, but never eaten together. You know?

Well. If you haven’t tried the combo, you must.

It’s everything!

This apple cheddar galette is made with honeycrisp apples, set in a cheddar herb crust and brushed with thyme butter! So delicious and perfect for fall.

I used my regular galette crust (why do I feel like the queen of galettes? I googled howsweeteats + galettes and I have so many! Because pie is terrifying?) and went with this cheddar version. I first shared it this past summer when I made tomato pie (it’s life changing, for real) and it’s a dreamy, cheesy crust! 

This apple cheddar galette is made with honeycrisp apples, set in a cheddar herb crust and brushed with thyme butter! So delicious and perfect for fall.

But! My favorite part of this whole thing might be the thyme butter. Brush just a touch of it on the apples once the whole thing comes out of the oven and you will be in heaven. It’s so decadent and buttery and indulgent and delicious. While still being a slightly lighter fruit dessert!

Before you tell me I’m crazy, I’m not saying this is LIGHT, but it’s not as decadent as a huge slice of double chocolate cake or something. Right?

I mean, it’s made with fruit… SO. 

https://www.howsweeteats.com/2015/07/summer-chicken-pot-pie-crostata-with-herbed-crust/

Anyhoo, you know I love a galette because it’s quicker and easier than pie. There is no stress over perfection – you just fold it into a “rustic” shape and then serve it on a fancy tray or plate from “Pottery Barn” (read: Home Goods or TJ Maxx) for that whole rustic vibe. 

And it feels fancy! 

https://www.howsweeteats.com/2015/07/summer-chicken-pot-pie-crostata-with-herbed-crust/

Seriously tastes like the best slice of fall you’ve ever had.

https://www.howsweeteats.com/2015/07/summer-chicken-pot-pie-crostata-with-herbed-crust/

Apple Cheddar Galette with Thyme Butter

Apple Cheddar Galette

This apple cheddar galette is made with honeycrisp apples, set in a cheddar herb crust and brushed with thyme butter! So delicious and perfect for fall.

crust

  • 4 cups sifted all-purpose flour
  • 1 tablespoon sugar
  • 3 teaspoons salt
  • ¼ teaspoon dried thyme
  • 1 large egg, (lightly beaten)
  • 1 teaspoon white vinegar
  • 1/2 cup ice cold water
  • 1 cup cold unsalted butter, (cut into pieces)
  • 2/3 cup finely grated sharp cheddar cheese
  • for brushing: 1 egg + a few drops of water, (beaten together)
  • coarse sugar mixed with a pinch of dried thyme, (for sprinkling)

filling

  • 2 large honeycrisp apples, (thinly sliced)
  • 1 1/2 tablespoons cornstarch
  • 1 1/2 tablespoons sugar
  • 1/4 teaspoon ground cinnamon
  • 1/4 teaspoon ground ginger
  • 1/4 teaspoon salt

salted thyme butter

  • 3 tablespoons unsalted butter
  • 1 tablespoon fresh thyme leaves
  • pinch of salt
  1. Add the flour, sugar, thyme and salt to a food processor and pulse just until combined. In a small bowl, whisk mix together the egg, vinegar and water. Add the cold butter pieces and cheddar into the food processor and pulse until small coarse crumbs remain. Sprinkle the water/egg mixture over the flour and pulse again until the dough comes together.
  2. Remove the dough with your hands and wrap it in plastic wrap. This dough makes enough for 2 galette crusts, so you can either separate it into 2 sections now, or separate it after it’s refrigerated. Refrigerate the dough for 30 minutes. (The other dough can be thrown in the fridge for a few months!)
  3. After 30 minutes, preheat the oven to 400 degrees F.

filling

  1. Add the sliced apples to a bowl. Sprinkle the apples with cornstarch, sugar, cinnamon, ground ginger and salt. Toss the apples well and let them sit for 10 minutes.
  2. Remove one of the crusts from the fridge. (The other is good for another week or so, or it can be frozen.) Roll one of the pie crusts into a… “rustic” shape – no shape necessary really – until it is about 1/4 inch thick. Place the dough on a parchment-lined baking sheet.
  3. Layer the apples in the center leaving a 2-inch+ border of crust. Once the apples are layered, fold the crust over top of the apples. Brush the crust with the beaten egg wash. Sprinkle any of the exposed crust with coarse sugar. Bake the galette until the crust is golden, about 40 to 45 minutes.
  4. Before serving, brush the apples with the thyme butter.

thyme butter

  1. Place the butter and thyme in a saucepan. Heat over low heat until the butter melts, then let it sit for 10 minutes. Sprinkle in the pinch of salt and stir.

https://www.howsweeteats.com/2015/07/summer-chicken-pot-pie-crostata-with-herbed-crust/

Those little triangles of love though!

The post Honeycrisp Galette with Cheddar Crust and Thyme Butter. appeared first on How Sweet Eats.

31 Perfect Gifts for Your Favorite Plant Mom (Or Dad)

There are people who love plants and people who love plants. The former will put a houseplant or two on their Christmas list; the latter will capture every shimmy of their telegraph plant on time-lapse; think nothing of having 100 plants in a studio ap…

There are people who love plants and people who love plants. The former will put a houseplant or two on their Christmas list; the latter will capture every shimmy of their telegraph plant on time-lapse; think nothing of having 100 plants in a studio apartment; and skip Thanksgiving because who leaves their Fiddle Leaf Fig alone for a minute?!

They are also known to fill their homes with plant and garden-themed objects and ephemera. As such, they’re the easiest, and the most fun, to shop for. Not unlike cat ladies. (Cat mamas will be thrilled with anything with unnecessary whiskers on it.)

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This ‘Magic Green Sauce’ Earns Its Name, Thanks to a Few Tricks

Carla Lalli Music has a lot of tricks up her sleeves. (Which are often sensibly short, colorful, and brandishing enthusiastically over a burbling pot of something buttery—as you’ll know, if you’re one of the millions who love to watch her skillfully ex…

Carla Lalli Music has a lot of tricks up her sleeves. (Which are often sensibly short, colorful, and brandishing enthusiastically over a burbling pot of something buttery—as you’ll know, if you’re one of the millions who love to watch her skillfully execute recipes on the internet.)

But my favorite of Music’s tricks to date comes not in the form of a garlic-slicing demo on YouTube, or from last month’s Bon Appétit, where she’s Food Director—it’s tucked onto one of the later pages of her new cookbook Where Cooking Begins, in the recipe for Magic Green Sauce.

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How to Make Vegetable Stock Without a Recipe

We love recipes—but do we always use them? Of course not. Because once you realize you don’t always need a recipe, you’ll make your favorite dishes a lot more often. Here, we show you how to make soups and stews more flavorful with what…

We love recipes—but do we always use them? Of course not. Because once you realize you don't always need a recipe, you'll make your favorite dishes a lot more often. Here, we show you how to make soups and stews more flavorful with whatever vegetable scraps you have on hand—or the cheapest produce at the market.

If you're not already making your own vegetable stock, you should start now.

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