Giant Chipotle Baked Beans

A riff on Laurence Jossel’s famous NOPA beans – plump, creamy beans baked in a bright, chunky chipotle tomato sauce, topped with crunchy breadcrumbs, plenty of oozy queso fresco, and an emerald drizzle of cilantro pesto.

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Food & Wine magazine’s Emily Kaiser wrote an article in November of 2008 that highlighted two of my favorite things: Steve Sando’s Rancho Gordo heirloom beans, and a bean recipe from NOPA – a restaurant that was just a short walk from my front door for many years. I’ve enjoyed Laurence Jossel’s beans countless times, both at the restaurant and by making them in my own kitchen. I even brought them to Thanksgiving one year. Imagine plump, creamy beans baked in a bright, chunky tomato sauce, topped with crunchy breadcrumbs, plenty of tangy crumbled feta, and an emerald drizzle of oregano-parsley pesto. I love his original recipe, but the last time I made them I decided to add a few of my own twists. I did a subtly smoky chipotle-version of the tomato sauce, a cilantro drizzle, kale, whole grain bread crumbs, and queso fresco cheese. I’m including the recipe down below.
Chipotle Baked Beans

Make Ahead Magic

One of the great things about this recipe is that you can do many of the components ahead of time. You can boil the dried beans, make the pesto, make the tomato sauce, and toast the breadcrumbs. None of which are exceedingly difficult. You can then assemble the components in a flash, and into the oven it goes. Perfect for when you have friends over.
Chipotle Baked Beans

Can I Use Canned Beans?

I’m sure someone is going to ask, so I’ll answer ahead of time – how about substituting canned beans? Ok – here’s the deal – in my experience canned beans lack the structure that beans cooked from scratch have. The canned guys tend to break and go to mush far more quickly. In this recipe they will likely work, but won’t hold up as well. The flavor will be fine, but the texture will be a different beast. If you go this route, don’t skimp on the bread crumbs.
Chipotle Baked Beans
Give these beans a try (either version!), they are outrageously good. The shot above is the recipe in progress, before baking. And the photo below is the beans prior to soaking. They’re huge. You’re looking for beans the size of your thumb prior to soaking for this recipe. I make some suggestion for different types in the recipe below.
Chipotle Baked Beans

Also! There are no shortage of bean recipes on this site. The ones I make most often are these homemade refried beans, and if you’ve never cooked beans from dried, no problem! This post will show you how to cook beans that are simple and amazing.

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Lemon Ricotta Pancakes

These lemon ricotta pancakes are tender, lemon-flecked, golden-edged beauties. The ricotta batter is bolstered with a bit of almond flour and enriched with olive oil.

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If we go camping together, you’re going to get pancakes. The bigger question is what type? I’ve been on a ricotta pancake kick lately, and decided to pack everything needed to make these Lemon Ricotta Pancakes on our road trip down the California coast last week. I tend to go through different pancake, waffle, crepe phases, but for the moment I’m all in here. These pancakes are tender, lemon-flecked, golden-edged beauties. The ricotta batter is bolstered with a bit of almond flour and enriched with olive oil. They are pancakes so delicious and pillowy tender it’s easy for two people to crush the whole stack.Lemon Ricotta Pancakes
There are a couple things that can make these pancakes even better – toppings and setting. If you can enjoy them outside, perhaps at a picnic table – go for it. I love an outdoor breakfast and was happy to enjoy a string of them last week. We beach-camped in Pismo, then Santa Barbara (finally visited Lotusland!), and then a couple nights in Malibu – outdoor meals everyday. I’ll post a few pics below 🙂
Lemon Ricotta Pancakes

Lemon Ricotta Pancake Toppings

I have a few suggested toppings here. I often like to make a break with maple syrup for these pancakes. Don’t get me wrong, maple syrup is good here, I just really like a ricotta-honey combo. These pancakes are incredibly good generously drizzled with saffron honey. I infuse a few threads of saffron in 1 teaspoon of almond extract, and then stir that into 1/3 cup of honey. I also brought a strong pink cinnamon honey along on the trip made by whisking ground Vietnamese cinnamon, cayenne powder, pitaya powder, vanilla extract and a few other ingredients to taste in some local honey.
Items on a Picnic Table with Green Plaid Tablecloth

Level-up Your Butter

Alternately, you can play around with compound butters. Whenever we go on a road-trip or camping I tend to bring stacks of frozen things. Thin stacks. Sauces, pestos, curry pastes and the like, frozen flat in baggies. I always bring a compound butter or two. Usually one sweet, for pancakes, biscuits, oatmeal, etc. And one savory – to toss with noodles, and veggies, quick pasta dishes, and that sort of thing. I like a salted butter mashed up with lots of lemon zest and brown sugar with the Lemon Ricotta Pancakes. Or butter mashed up with a splash of honey and some crushed freeze-dried berries.
Lemon Ricotta Pancakes

What if I don’t have Ricotta?

That’s okay! Do you have cottage cheese? You can swap that in for the ricotta. I suspect you could even swap in full-fat Greek yogurt, but I haven’t tested that version yet.
Lotusland
A few shots of Lotusland here, and the Mailbu Hindu Temple as well. Both highlights of our trip.
Malibu Hindu Temple

Ricotta Pancake Variations

There are a lot of ways to switch up this recipe with whatever citrus, spices, and seeds you have.

  • Lemon Poppyseed Ricotta Pancakes: Sprinkle a tablespoon of poppy seeds across the batter before folding in the whipped egg whites.
  • Lemon Olive Oil: Replace the olive oil with lemon olive oil for an added lemon boost.
  • Orange Ricotta Pancakes: Substitute the zest of one orange for the lemon zest.
  • Market Lime Ricotta Pancakes: I have a market lime tree on my patio and these pancakes are amazing with the zest of two makrut limes in place of the lemon zest.

Lotusland
I hope you love these ricotta pancakes as much as I do! There are more pancake recipes around in the the archives as well. Here’s where to go if you’re looking for more of a classic pancake recipe, if you’re looking for a good vegan pancake recipe, these blueberry beet pancakes sound wild, but are beautiful and delicious. And all things pancake are better with this blackberry saffron honey, a berry version of the saffron honey  I mentioned up above.

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Ten Best Bean Recipes

A round-up of the best bean recipes on my site. I’ve cooked a lot of beans over the years, and these recipes are ones I often circle back to.

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Wayne and I (and Polly!) have been camping our way down the California coast this week. It has been lots of shimmering ocean vistas, moody morning fog followed by glorious afternoon sunshine, French press coffee at picnic benches, and visits to two places I’ve wanted to see for a long time: Ganna Walska Lotusland & the Malibu Hindu Temple. I hope to have some pics and a new recipe to share soon! In the meantime, I thought a round-up of the best bean recipes in the archives might be helpful. I’ve cooked a lot of beans over the years, and these recipes are ones I often circle back to. Enjoy!

How to Cook Beans

How to Cook Beans that are Tender, Creamy & Nearly Perfect:

The best way I know to cook beans, and the one I always return to. A version of the much-loved Tuscan bean recipe – fagioli al fiasco. Traditionally, beans were baked overnight in a Chianti bottle placed near the embers of that night’s fire. While not exactly authentic (no fire here), I do a riff on the general idea, using a low-temperature oven and enamel-lined pot. Get the recipe.

Homemade Refried Beans

Homemade Refried Beans:

If you’ve only ever had refried beans from a can, this should be the next recipe you cook. Homemade refried beans are a game-changer. Use just the right amount of olive oil to cook well-minced onions along with the beans and plenty of their broth. Smoked paprika adds a hint of smoky depth you can’t quite put a finger on, my secret ingredient is a finishing splash of freshly squeezed lemon juice. I think it’s the element that helps keep the beans from seeming too heavy, and the acidity counters the starchiness of the beans. Get the recipe.

Giant Chipotle White Beans

Giant Chipotle White Beans:

A riff on Laurence Jossel’s fantastic NOPA beans – plump, creamy beans baked in a bright, chunky chipotle tomato sauce, topped with crunchy breadcrumbs, plenty of oozy queso fresco, and an emerald drizzle of cilantro pesto. Get the recipe.

Fire Broth Noodle Soup

Fire Broth Noodle Soup:

Soup of the year in our house. It’s loaded with good things like beans, greens, and pasta and the broth is spicy and invigorating with lots of pepper, garlic, ginger, and chiles. Get the recipe.

Fire Broth Noodle Soup

Mung Bean Hummus:

To get the smoothest, creamiest hummus using chickpeas, you have to peel them. For creamy hummus, without the extra effort, I use mung beans instead. They work beautifully. Top the hummus with shallot oil, fresh chives, and za’atar. Get the recipe.

Heirloom Bean and Mushroom “Carnitas” Casserole

Heirloom Bean and Mushroom “Carnitas” Casserole:

A favorite Rancho Gordo heirloom bean casserole recipe. The smell of garlic and herbs baking alongside the beans, simmering tomatoes, and mushrooms will bring neighbors in off the sidewalk. Get the recipe.

Carrot, Dill & White Bean Salad

Carrot, Dill & White Bean Salad:

Warm, coin-shaped slices of pan-fried carrots, white beans, and herbs tossed with a tangy-sweet lemon shallot dressing. It tastes good the day you make it, even better the day after. Get the recipe.

Ribollita

Ribollita – The Tuscan Stew you Should be Eating Regularly:

Ribollita, a beautifully thick Tuscan stew made with dark greens, lots of beans, vegetables, olive oil, and thickened with day-old bread. One of my favorites. Get the recipe.

How to Cook Beans

Dried Fava Soup with Mint and Guajillo Chiles:

Easily one of the best, most interesting soups I’ve cooked in years. Adapted from a recipe in Rick Bayless’s Mexican Kitchen – a dried fava bean and roasted tomato base topped with a fascinating cider-kissed tangy/sweet quick-pickled chile topping. Get the recipe.

Pan-fried Corona Beans & Kale

Pan-fried Corona Beans & Kale:

Love these – white beans pan-fried until they’re golden, with kale, Parmesan, lemon, walnuts, and nutmeg. Get the recipe.

And a little bonus! The lead photo image is these beautiful Giant Lemon Fennel Beans. Enjoy!

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A Tasty Frittata

The tastiest, super adaptable frittata recipe. Made with potatoes, onions, and eggs drizzled with a cilantro chile sauce.

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I make a lot of frittatas. They fill your belly, allow you to put neglected ingredients in your refrigerator to good use, and deliver a one-pan meal that is nutritious and filling. Breakfast, lunch, dinner – if you’ve got a six-pack of eggs on hand, a simple, satisfying meal is never more than a few minutes away.
“Frittata Recipe

Frittata Inspiration

This particular frittata recipe was inspired by a few things – a small bag of little potatoes I picked up at the market, and some delicious vegetables that came courtesy of a nutrient-packed mystery box I picked up regularly from Mariquita Farm when I lived in San Francisco. That’s what great about knowing how to cook a great frittata. You can switch it up using all sorts of different ingredients. And they’re great for breakfast, brunch, lunch, or dinner. 

The Special Sauce

I’ll let you in on a little secret, the magic touch in this particular frittata is the vibrant cilantro chile sauce I drizzle over the top of it. Drizzle the sauce over the eggs just before the frittata goes into the oven, then layer the potatoes and onions on top of the sauce – everything melds together into a color-flecked pan of deliciousness. The pumpkin seeds add just the right amount of crust – playing off the creaminess of the eggs and goat cheese. The cilantro sauce would also be delicious on Lori’s Skillet Smashed Potatoes or these oven fries.
“Frittata in a Cast Iron Pan

What is the Best Frittata Pan?

The main thing to think about when choosing a frittata pan is making sure it is oven-safe. I always reach for my well-seasoned cast iron pan. A lot of people like to use non-stick pans any time they cook eggs, and that is fine. For this recipe just be sure whatever you choose can handle a few minutes in a very hot oven. I love finishing my frittatas in the oven because they puff up, the eggs set up nicely, and the whole frittata comes together beautifully.

“Favorite Frittata Recipe with a Wedge Cut Out

Favorite Frittata Variations

I switch up my frittatas a thousand different ways. Some favorite ways: add a big dollop of green or red curry paste to the whisked eggs. Sriracha is also fair game. You can switch up the cheese, or nuts, or top them with just about any pre-cooked vegetables. I love broccoli, or asparagus, or mix chopped kale into the egg mixture.

Give this a try! Other favorite egg recipes include: deviled eggs, egg salad sandwich, this skinny omelette, and pickled turmeric eggs. If you’re looking for more brunchy breakfast recipes don’t miss this healthy granola, or the best waffle recipe, these homemade cinnamon rolls, classic pancakes, tofu scramble, Herb Cream Cheese Scrambled Eggs, and the baked oatmeal is always popular!

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Carrot, Dill & White Bean Salad

Warm, coin-shaped slices of pan-fried carrots, white beans, and herbs tossed with a tangy-sweet lemon shallot dressing. It tastes good the day you make it, even better the day after.

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I bought a single bunch of bushy-topped carrots the other day. At first glance it was a good looking cluster – bright orange in color with vibrant greens still attached. But it was on second glance that I noticed the tiny carrots nestled beside their larger brothers and sisters. Some of the smallest carrots were no thicker than a knitting needle, not much longer than my pinky finger. I snacked on those after a quick rinse. The bigger guys I put to work in this skillet-tossed, herb-flecked white bean salad.
Carrot, Dill & White Bean Salad Recipe

A Simple Skillet Bean Salad

This recipe isn’t complicated. Warm, coin-shaped slices of golden, pan-fried carrots, white beans and chopped herbs are tossed with a tangy-sweet lemon shallot dressing. It tastes good the day you make it, even better the day after. And although it’s certainly not as pretty, in my opinion, it might taste best on day three as the shallots infused the beans and the lemon mellowed.

Carrots and beans in a cast iron skillet

The Details

  • Carrots: When shopping for carrots, look for young carrots with their greens still attached. This is one way you can get a good sense of whether the bunch is fresh or not. Can you use standard grocery store carrots? Sure! Look for bunches with smaller carrots if possible. Or if those aren’t available, trim your carrot coins into half moons.
  • Beans: On the bean front, I tend to cook the beans from scratch. I like a creamy, smallish white bean for this salad. Alubia beans,  Peruano beans, and cannellini beans have all worked great. And yes! You can use well-drained canned white beans if you want to throw this together on a whim.
  • Herbs: I starting making this bean salad with dill. I like how dill is always a bit unexpected, and it works beautifully to cut the creaminess of the white beans, while maintaining an ability to stand up to the shallots and lemon juice. Basil is a nice alternative if you’re out of dill. Cilantro is great. I mean it’s hard to go wrong with your herb component. Use what you have.

Baby carrots and white beans

Make a Meal of It

This recipe has now been in our repertoire for a few years. One of my favorite things to do is make a double batch. It can hang out in the refrigerator for a couple days, no problem, and makes a great side to many meals. That said, I often turn it into a favorite dinner. Tossing the bean salad with any short pasta like penne, radiatore, or rigatoni and a bit of goat cheese is fantastic. To get a bolt of green into in the mix I often add broccoli florets, or asparagus segments to the pasta water at the last minute. Re-season with salt and lemon juice if needed.

Carrot, Dill & White Bean Salad in a Pink Bowl border=

Variations

There are so many different ways to re-mix this bean salad. Once you have the base of skillet beans and carrots, playing around with the dressing can take it in dramatically different directions. For example, you can skip the lemony-shallot dressing and use a thinned out pesto instead. The crushed walnut sauce I use here is another option.  I’ve also done a roasted red pepper puree thinned out with olive oil and boosted with cayenne for another twist.

Rachel D. mentioned in the comments, “…I added fava beans that I found at the UN Plaza farmers market (I thought fava season was over but I guess not!) and some preserved lemon. Also added less than the 2 tb sugar and it was sweet enough.” Love this idea.

Carrot, Dill & White Bean Salad on a Table with Two Glasses

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TLT Sandwich

A vegetarian TLT sandwich inspired by the classic BLT sandwich. This version includes chipotle-marinated tempeh alongside oven-roasted cherry tomatoes, a bit of shredded lettuce, and a generous avocado slather on a thin slice (or two) of great bread.

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At this point in time, no other sandwich I make is more requested. Instead of a classic BLT sandwich, I make a TLT – tempeh, lettuce, and tomato. Not an original concept, but my secret is this…every component needs to be over-the-top flavorful. Roasted Tomatoes for TLT Sandwich
My version features chipotle-marinated tempeh alongside oven-roasted cherry tomatoes, a bit of shredded lettuce and a generous slather of avocado on a thin slice (or two) of great bread. For anyone looking for a hearty, substantial, satisfying, nutritious, and meatless lunch – it’s hard to beat .
Side View of Epic TLT Sandwich
You’ll need to plan ahead a bit to marinate the tempeh and roast the tomatoes, but I promise it’s well worth the effort, and if you make extra you’ll have sandwiches for the week. Tempeh is easy to find in most Whole Foods Markets or natural food stores – here’s a link to another favorite tempeh recipe in case you are interested in other ways of using it.
Side View of Epic TLT Sandwich

I enjoy this TLT sandwich on a big, ultra-thin slice of whole wheat walnut bread – toasted until crisp. You can go the traditional sandwich route, or enjoy it open-faced. And now I’m thinking that miniature versions of these might be great bite-sized party food? 

If you’re game for more tempeh inspiration, don’t miss out on these tempeh recipes. And be sure to pay special attention to this Spicy Tempeh Crumble Bowl, and this Tempeh Taco Salad

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Garlic Lime Lettuce Wraps

Ginger and garlic tempeh rice, folded into lime-spiked lettuce wraps with lots of herbs, cucumber, and carrots. A one-pan meal that comes together in no time!

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Lettuce wraps are a fave around here (and a nice change from taco night). This has become a favorite weeknight meal. Ginger and garlic tempeh rice, folded into lime-spiked lettuce wraps with lots of herbs, cucumber, and carrots. It’s a one-pan meal that comes together in no time!

Garlic Lime Lettuce Wraps

A couple of tips related to this recipe. If you find a tempeh brand you like, buy it in multiples. It freezes really well. Also, I like to make these lettuce wraps with brown rice that I’ve blended with other grains – like a little bit of millet, and quinoa. But, brown jasmine rice on it’s own is also A+! Experiment with toppings – a sprinkling of toasted nuts, or even a dollop of guacamole is always good.

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Skinny Omelette

Eggs cooked crepe-thin and stuffed. A delicious and lighter alternative to heavy, cheese-stuffed omelette recipes – great for lunch and brunch.

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It has been four years since I started featuring recipes on this site. In all that time I’ve never featured an omelette recipe. Broadly speaking, I like the idea of omelettes, but they typically aren’t very exciting. Not that they couldn’t be! When I reflect on the past ten omelettes I’ve encountered, more times than not they have been bulging envelopes of egg oozing steady rivers of melted cheese. They are nearly always served with a side of greasy home-fries. All great for tempering a mild hangover, not so great for everyday eats. So instead of complaining, I offer you my omelette recipe makeover.
Favorite Omelette Recipe

The Skinny Omelette

In my mind an omelette is a beaten egg (or eggs) gently cooked in a pan and sometimes stuffed with good stuff. As I started rethinking the way I wanted to approach my omelette-making, I opted to keep the beating, cooking, and stuffing intact. I played with a few other variables instead. Deciding to cook the eggs extra thin – almost crepe thin – was key. I also opted for rolling instead of folding. This ended up being a great call because the omelette then lends itself to a lovely (and functional) diagonal cut, you can see a cross-section of the ingredients. One more pro-tip – try to avoid over-stuffing them. You’re looking for a nice egg to filling ratio. Keeping it all relatively light.

So, what you see above is what I whipped up for breakfast this morning. I was in and out of the kitchen (with photo!) in less than twelve minutes, counters cleaned, dishes done. And for those of you who are gluten-intolerant or can’t have gluten, it just dawned on me that these could be considered gluten-free crepes.

Creative Omelette Variations

For this omelette I used my favorite pesto, a small handful of herbs and greens, and crumbled goat cheese in addition to the omelette-egg base. But don’t let that limit you. There are a million ways you can remix this omelette recipe. You can add spices, seasonings, tiny grains, herbs, curry pastes, and infusions to the eggs before cooking. You can play around with different spreads, cheeses, mashed beans, tangy yogurt, salsa and/or avocados as filling. If you like Thai flavors, use Thai ingredients. If you like Japanese flavors, integrate those ingredients. The potential combinations are fun, delicious, and endless.

There are some great egg and omelette suggestions in the comments. Check them out! Marichan says, “…my mother puts dashi, shoyu and a touch of sugar in her omelette. I think those three flavors and the texture of the eggs are what I love. Sometimes she rolls the omelette into a long rectangle using the square egg pan. That’s yummy but I really love the thin, crepe like omelette. Sometimes she will stuff them with chirashizushi (sushi rice with various vegetables mixed in) or put it over Japanese style fried rice.“

Carol also highlights this feisty combination: sun-dried tomatoes, spinach, little blocks of feta cheese and a dollop of homemade harissa.

If you’re on the lookout for other egg recipes my other favorites include: deviled eggs, egg salad sandwich, these special herby cream cheese scrambled eggs, this frittata, and pickled turmeric eggs.

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Grillable Tofu Burgers

Seasoned with a good amount of cumin, cayenne and mustard, these are hearty, filling, easy to make, dump-everything-in-the-food processor grillable tofu burgers.

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Wayne calls this the “1996 Veggie Burger.” It’s basically an old-school hippie burger. I love them for a few reasons. First, they’re grill-able. Second, they’re made from ingredients I understand – organic tofu, seeds, nuts, eggs, spices, and breadcrumbs. And third, they’re endlessly adaptable by switching up the spices & your burger toppings.
A Grillable Tofu Burger Recipe

The Recipe

On the cooking front, I’ve been cleaning out some drawers. Primarily going through old magazine clippings (which is part of the reason I’ve been featuring more magazine inspired recipes than usual). I’ve been finding lots of gems, and these tofu burgers jumped out at me. I’ve adapted them from a reader contributed recipe that ran in the October 2004 issue of Sunset Magazine. The recipe was sent to Sunset by Jeremy Wolf of San Francisco, and I enjoyed them so much! They were impossibly easy to make, relying on the “throw everything in the food processor” technique, and called for a quirky mix of ingredients ranging from tofu, seeds, and nuts, to mustard, cumin, and mushrooms. In the years since, I’ve done a lot of variations, and I’ll talk through a few of them below.

I will say, I suspect you’ll be tempted to tweak the seasonings, and you should! But here’s my advice. Don’t skimp on the cumin or mustard, you need some assertive flavors to kick in – keep in mind you’re dealing with ground tofu and eggs as a burger base. Whatever you do think bold!

Ingredients in Food Processor for Tofu Burgers

Tofu Burgers – How To Cook Them

One of the great things about these is you can cook them a number of ways. You can use a skillet, you can grill them, or you can bake them. The main thing you need to do is blend the mixture to a smooth-ish consistency. Then firmly shape and press the mixture into firm patties. I call for the firmest tofu you can find (extra-firm), but each tofu brand has a different quantity of water in it. If your mixture is too wet, simply blend in more breadcrumbs 1/4 cup at a time, and go from there. The mixture also firms up as it sits, so keep that in mind. You can let it rest for 10 minutes or so before shaping if you have the time.
A Grillable Tofu Burger Recipe

Tofu Burger Variations

A number of people have attempted to make these without the egg. I haven’t tested that version yet, but here’s are a few notes from the comments. From Lisa,”For the vegan, I reserved part of the batch before adding eggs, and put in a tablespoon of almond butter as a binder, plus a little extra breadcrumbs.” Jacqui says,”…although I was out of eggs, so I used 2 T of chia seeds mixed with 6 T of water as a replacement. Worked great!”

For a gluten-free option Lisa commented with this brilliance, “I make something similar to these and use masa harina instead of breadcrumbs for a gluten-free option… it definitely gives it a “southwestern” twist, and is SO delicious.”

Cooking Tips

If you’re nervous about the patties falling through grill grates, Judith says,”…my husband was in charge of the grill, started out on aluminum foil, we thought they might fall through the grates, he ended up putting them right on the grates (they firmed up while cooking on the foil for a bit) and they were wonderful!”

Enjoy!!

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Caramelized Brussels Sprouts and Apples with Tofu

A Brussels sprout recipe for people who think they might not like them. Shredded Brussels sprout ribbons, apples, garlic, pine nuts, and tofu in a skillet with a hint of maple syrup.

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I bought a three-foot stretch of Brussels sprouts the other morning at the farmers’ market. For those of you who’ve never encountered the spectacle of Brussels sprouts still on the stalk, it is something to behold. A thick, stick-straight center stalk is punctuated by tight, green Brussels sprout pom-poms. It looks fantastically prehistoric. And while it doesn’t fit very nicely in my market basket, once I get it home the sprouts will keep nicely this way – seemingly longer than off the stalk.
Brussels Sprouts on Stalk
I buy sprouts on the stalk whenever I can, and typically get three or four sprout-centric meals out of each, breaking off the buds as needed. In this case I combined shredded Brussels sprout ribbons, apples, garlic, pine nuts, (and tofu if you like) in a skillet with a hint of maple syrup.
Caramelized Brussels Sprouts and Apples with Tofu
I know not all are Brussels sprout fans, but based on some of the emails you’ve passed along to me, this golden-crusted Brussels sprout recipe seems to be a well-received gateway recipe for people who thought they didn’t like Brussels sprouts, but really do. You could start there, and then make the jump to this recipe if you’re at all apprehensive. Or, I highlight a few other ideas down below….

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