What to Do With Crunchy, Sweet & Spicy Peppers

It’s the season of overflowing market bags, heavy CSA boxes, and gardens run amok. Alexandra Stafford of Alexandra Cooks is showing us how to store, prep, and make the most of the bounty, without wasting a scrap.
Today: How to store…

It's the season of overflowing market bags, heavy CSA boxes, and gardens run amok. Alexandra Stafford of Alexandra Cooks is showing us how to store, prep, and make the most of the bounty, without wasting a scrap.

Today: How to store, prep, and make the most of the season's pepper crop, whether you have just a handful or you picked so many you should be called Peter Piper. Start with Yotam Ottolenghi's marinated pepper salad.

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6 Knife Mistakes We’re Never, Ever Making Again

We’re teaming up with Shun Cutlery to celebrate the launch of their brand-new Premier Grey Knife Collection, which has all the slicers and dicers you need to tackle any kitchen task. Here, we’re sharing the knife mistakes we’ve made—and learned from—ov…

We’re teaming up with Shun Cutlery to celebrate the launch of their brand-new Premier Grey Knife Collection, which has all the slicers and dicers you need to tackle any kitchen task. Here, we’re sharing the knife mistakes we’ve made—and learned from—over the years, so you can keep your own blades in tip-top shape.


My cramped galley kitchen is filled to the brim with all sorts of cookware, tools, storage containers, pantry goods, and gadgets. Some of those things I reach for on the daily (nonstick skillet and electric kettle: check and check), while a couple I’m ashamed to say I’ve used just a handful of times. (Vegetable spiralizer, it was fun while it lasted.)

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What Is Durum Wheat (& How the Heck Do You Bake With It)

The Perfect Loaf is a column from software engineer-turned-bread expert (and Food52’s Resident Bread Baker), Maurizio Leo. Maurizio is here to show us all things naturally leavened, enriched, yeast-risen, you name it—basically, every vehicle to slather…

The Perfect Loaf is a column from software engineer-turned-bread expert (and Food52's Resident Bread Baker), Maurizio Leo. Maurizio is here to show us all things naturally leavened, enriched, yeast-risen, you name it—basically, every vehicle to slather on a lot of butter. Today, how to turn high-protein durum flour into a golden loaf of bread.


If you’re a fresh pasta-maker, chances are high you’re familiar with durum wheat. Though the species is most commonly used to make pasta, it’s also an excellent choice to incorporate into bread. It’s a hard wheat—hence the name durum, which is Latin for “hard,”—and is so-called because of the strength of the durum berry itself, requiring significant force to mill. The grain has a high protein percentage, but the gluten quality in durum flour doesn’t have the same gas-trapping characteristics as traditional wheat. This means when using even finely-milled durum flour. The resulting bread will have a tighter, more cake-like crumb, or internal structure, somewhat akin to a loaf of whole wheat bread (as opposed to a super-light loaf with large inner holes, like a country loaf). Though there are visual and textural differences to a loaf of bread made durum wheat, there’s no compromise made: The color, aroma, and flavors from durum are all quite striking when used in bread, yielding a more rustic loaf but nonetheless delicious.

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7 Decor DIYs That Will Instantly Refresh Your Home

For many, the first couple of months of a new year are synonymous with resolutions: saving money, spending more time with friends and family, scoring that promotion etc. 2021 is shaping up to be a bit different. Hunkered down and (still) social distanc…

For many, the first couple of months of a new year are synonymous with resolutions: saving money, spending more time with friends and family, scoring that promotion etc. 2021 is shaping up to be a bit different. Hunkered down and (still) social distancing, many homeowners and renters say this year is about getting their hands dirty—and keeping their minds occupied—by focusing on the four walls around them.

Beau Ciolino and his fiancé Matthew Armato are no exception. Since moving into their New Orleans, LA Victorian a year ago, the couple has been decorating against the grain—and sharing the process with the followers of their popular Instagram and blog Probably This. Their latest über modern addition? A DIY fluted table made from PVC pipe and birch plywood that’s been drenched in limewash to help it resemble stone.

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DIY Sachets for Sweet-Smelling Sock Drawers

As we’re sure you well know, the months of February and March can easily stretch into what feels like a never-ending winter, especially when warm, teasing days poke through just to be dashed by a forecast of snow the next. One way to make them fe…

As we’re sure you well know, the months of February and March can easily stretch into what feels like a never-ending winter, especially when warm, teasing days poke through just to be dashed by a forecast of snow the next. One way to make them feel instantly less bleak? A breezy little assembly-line craft, and one that’ll (physically) warm your cold, winter hands.

These sweet-smelling handmade sachets are just the thing to spruce up your unmentionables drawer and air out stuffy closets—smaller ones are kind of like boxes of baking soda in their ability to stave off stale odors lingering in last season’s clothes. Not only that, but larger versions can be popped in the microwave for about a minute and act as the world’s best-smelling heating pad for your snow-shovel backache. Come summer, these little guys can also be stashed in the freezer to relieve the back of your neck from sweltering temps, as well as provide gentle cold relief to strained muscles. 

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How to Make Creamy, Dreamy Almond Milk

There are some food that I will never attempt to DIY: cereal, yogurt, my favorite seedy sourdough (sadly, my starter died of neglect months ago.) Still, there are other grocery list staples that I will never buy again. Fluffy hummus, crunchy, steaming …

There are some food that I will never attempt to DIY: cereal, yogurt, my favorite seedy sourdough (sadly, my starter died of neglect months ago.) Still, there are other grocery list staples that I will never buy again. Fluffy hummus, crunchy, steaming English muffins, and almond milk that’s creamier—and way more flavorful—than my go-to tetra pack. But not all homemade almond milk is created equal. It can be gritty, bitter, or watery if made wrong. As a lifelong lactose intolerant, I’ve garnered my fair share of tips for the absolute best almond milk at home. Follow these steps and you may never want to go back to the store-bought stuff.

Back to Basics

Let’s start with the basics: the nuts themselves. You must start with skin-on, raw, unsalted almonds. But I already have a bulk bag of salted, roasted almonds from Costco! I know, I know, but save those for snacking. To get a subtly sweet, ultra-creamy final product, raw nuts are paramount. Soaking roasted nuts brings out their bitterness, and because they’re drier to begin with, they yield a gritty milk. (Soaking nuts also won’t remove any flavors, so unless you want Thai chili- or salt & vinegar-flavored almond milk, use unseasoned almonds.) Another reminder: Nuts are full of oil and can go rancid at room temperature; unsurprisingly, rancid almonds will make sour almond milk. Before you put the effort in, do yourself a favor and taste one to ensure the nuts are fresh, especially if they've been in your pantry for a while.

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A 5-Minute Art Project to Bookmark for the Weekend

Follow the Pattern is a brand new column from furniture maker and upholstery expert (and Home52’s Resident Design Wiz), Nicole Crowder. Nicole is here to show us how to breathe new life into old furniture, reuse and repurpose materials, take chances wi…

Follow the Pattern is a brand new column from furniture maker and upholstery expert (and Home52's Resident Design Wiz), Nicole Crowder. Nicole is here to show us how to breathe new life into old furniture, reuse and repurpose materials, take chances with color and pattern—and develop a signature aesthetic. Today, she guides us through a relaxing, anyone-can-do-it block print DIY with so many possibilities.


Like many of you, I love a bold, colorful art print in my home. Art has a striking impact on so much of your home—from mood to dimensions to energy—and for me, the larger the canvas, the better.

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How to Transform Any (Yes, Any!) Entryway Using Just Paint

With help from our sponsor Behr—makers of high-quality paints in every shade—we’re sharing color-filled paint projects anyone can pull off, whether you’re a first-time DIY-er or a seasoned pro. Here, we’re showing you how to transform any entryway into…

With help from our sponsor Behr—makers of high-quality paints in every shade—we're sharing color-filled paint projects anyone can pull off, whether you're a first-time DIY-er or a seasoned pro. Here, we're showing you how to transform any entryway into a beautiful-meets-functional space using BEHR ULTRA® SCUFF DEFENSE™ Interior Extra Durable Flat Paint.


I once heard that if you intend to stay in your home for longer than a year, you should paint it to suit your taste. As someone who’s done nearly everything within the realm of rental possibility (removable wallpaper, peel & stick floor tiles, countless things nailed and drilled), I’ve learned that painting walls is actually the easiest project among them—and has the biggest impact, as well.

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What Is Marzipan? Plus, How to Make it From Scratch

Marzipan, the almond-based confection with roots in the Middle East, Latin America, and all over Europe, deserves a better reputation. The average home baker in the United States probably doesn’t consider it to be their favorite flavor, let alone worth…

Marzipan, the almond-based confection with roots in the Middle East, Latin America, and all over Europe, deserves a better reputation. The average home baker in the United States probably doesn’t consider it to be their favorite flavor, let alone worthy of a permanent spot in their pantry.

But Chef Stephen L. Durfee, professor of baking and pastry at the Culinary Institute of America, is happy to make the case for both points—and restore the good name of marzipan overall.

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The 30-Second Trick to Upgrade Any Place Setting

If there is one element that can transform your tablescape, it is the deceptively subtle multipurpose linen napkin. Even if you use the same dishes and flatware at every gathering, if you change up your napkins or even play with varied napkin folds, an…

If there is one element that can transform your tablescape, it is the deceptively subtle multipurpose linen napkin. Even if you use the same dishes and flatware at every gathering, if you change up your napkins or even play with varied napkin folds, any gathering can be transformed into an elegant and special occasion.

One basic tip on harnessing the versatile power of the napkin: have a few different color options in your linen closet, so you can vary shades to complement the food, florals, setting and occasion. You can hand-fold a napkin in a variety of ways and use a diverse range of materials to tie or shape linens, such as ribbons, floral elements, and napkin rings.

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