How to Use Up the Rest of a Can of Sweetened Condensed Milk

My mornings these days start off with a cup of freshly brewed coffee and a scoop of thick sweetened condensed milk. I skip the cream and sugar all together, since sweetened condensed milk—milk that’s been concentrated and heavily sweetened; its viscosi…

My mornings these days start off with a cup of freshly brewed coffee and a scoop of thick sweetened condensed milk. I skip the cream and sugar all together, since sweetened condensed milk—milk that's been concentrated and heavily sweetened; its viscosity is like molasses or honey and it moves just as slowly—gives creaminess and sweetness in one product.

My mother always had a can in the pantry at any given time. It was a staple in our home. We baked with it, sweetened Jamaican cornmeal porridge with it, and my mother used it in her tea. Once I've opened a can, I store the remaining milk (poured out of the can) in an airtight container in the refrigerator for up to a week. (And if you want to met it yourself, Stephanie Le has a simple recipe for making a batch of sweetened condensed milk of your own.)

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Fresh Tarragon and Its 9 Best Uses

Every week we get Down & Dirty, in which we break down our favorite unique seasonal fruits, vegetables, and more.
Today: All this month we’ll be stocking up on fresh herbs to get our spring fix. Next up, tarragon. Read More >>

Every week we get Down & Dirty, in which we break down our favorite unique seasonal fruits, vegetables, and more.

Today: All this month we'll be stocking up on fresh herbs to get our spring fix. Next up, tarragon.

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11 Great Corn Syrup Substitutes (in Case You Don’t Have it on Hand)

In the U.S., at least, corn syrup is ubiquitous. We mix it into our marshmallows and pour it over our pancakes; we sip it in our sodas and cook it into our caramels. In its high-fructose form, the average American has consumed more than 40 pounds a yea…

In the U.S., at least, corn syrup is ubiquitous. We mix it into our marshmallows and pour it over our pancakes; we sip it in our sodas and cook it into our caramels. In its high-fructose form, the average American has consumed more than 40 pounds a year over the past decade. Light and dark corn syrups, the versions typically used by home cooks, can be found in nearly every supermarket and bodega in the country.

And yet, here you are, in search of a substitute. Maybe it’s for health reasons. Maybe you don’t feel like walking to the store. Maybe you’ve slipped into an alternate reality where Gottlieb Kirchhoff seriously miscalculated the sulfuric acid concentration before taking a sip of his new syrup, and didn’t survive to share his results. If you’ve never heard of Gottlieb Kirchhoff, then that must be it.

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16 Red Cabbage Recipes That Are Anything but Boring

I have my husband’s grandmother Violet to thank for introducing me to my favorite holiday side dish: Danish red cabbage, which is a mix of vinegar, sugar, lots of butter, a jar of red currant jelly, and two heads of chopped red cabbage. I’ve neve…

I have my husband's grandmother Violet to thank for introducing me to my favorite holiday side dish: Danish red cabbage, which is a mix of vinegar, sugar, lots of butter, a jar of red currant jelly, and two heads of chopped red cabbage. I’ve never seen Violet make it, but I’ve heard that when she does, she tends to it all day, dipping a fork into her Dutch oven often to taste and adjust and season. Apparently, no one in the family makes it as well as Violet.

Every year in the weeks leading up to Thanksgiving, I look forward to pulling out her handwritten recipe card and attempting to replicate this old family standby. I love it so much, in fact, that I associate red cabbage with only this dish. And as soon as the holidays pass, I don't want to think about any other cabbage preparation besides this one, the following fall.

So when heads of red cabbage (also called purple cabbage) show up in my CSA box, I struggle to put them to use, often shoving them in the vegetable bin where they sit for weeks until I shred them into a basic slaw or simply roast them in wedges. Both are preparations that always leave me wanting.

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Is Mortadella the Best Cold Cut? (Is That Even a Question?)

Mortadella is having a moment.

As a cured meat obsessive, I’ve always vaguely known about it—mainly as an element of certain sandwiches, like the muffuletta. But it wasn’t until recently that I started encountering it almost every time I went out to e…

Mortadella is having a moment.

As a cured meat obsessive, I’ve always vaguely known about it—mainly as an element of certain sandwiches, like the muffuletta. But it wasn’t until recently that I started encountering it almost every time I went out to eat.

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16 Stellar Ways to Use Radicchio

How often have you been at the farmers market and, unsure of what exactly that beautiful vegetable you’re looking at is called, mumbled “I’ll have one of those” under your breath while pointing at the object of your desire? Let’s agree to stop doing th…

How often have you been at the farmers market and, unsure of what exactly that beautiful vegetable you're looking at is called, mumbled "I'll have one of those" under your breath while pointing at the object of your desire? Let's agree to stop doing that. Head out to the market this weekend and confidently ask for the ruh-DEE-key-oh.

What Is Radicchio?

Radicchio is a type of chicory (as is puntarelle) and—along with artichokes, burdock, and Jerusalem artichokes—a member of the sunflower family. Endive, another member of the family, is very closely related to chicories (they’re all in the Cichorium genus), and they can be confusingly named depending on where you live in the world; what we think of as endive is known elsewhere as chicory.

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From Walnut to Avocado, Here Are 6 Specialty Oils to Add to Your Pantry

We’ve teamed up with La Tourangelle—makers of artisan oils, salad dressings, and cooking sprays—to show you all the wonderful ways you can use their specialty oils (think: roasted walnut oil, avocado oil, toasted sesame oil, and more) at home.

Take …

We've teamed up with La Tourangelle—makers of artisan oils, salad dressings, and cooking sprays—to show you all the wonderful ways you can use their specialty oils (think: roasted walnut oil, avocado oil, toasted sesame oil, and more) at home.


Take a look inside your pantry. What do you see? Olive oil, certainly. Vegetable oil? Check. Always stocked in the most basic of cupboards, these two kitchen workhorses will help you make just about any dish.

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19 Sweet-as-Heck Substitutes for Brown Sugar

Perhaps I am not the best person to go to for advice about sugar. After all, I didn’t know it existed until I was about six. As a kid, I was always the first one to leave the birthday party with my mom. We left, you see, so I wouldn’t discover the cake…

Perhaps I am not the best person to go to for advice about sugar. After all, I didn’t know it existed until I was about six. As a kid, I was always the first one to leave the birthday party with my mom. We left, you see, so I wouldn’t discover the cake. Weaving through the front gardens of my kindergarten friends’ oversize Berkeley homes, my mother would pick the candy from the goodie bag and, with righteous conviction, toss it into the potted plants.

You can imagine my surprise when, around the time my friends found out about Santa, I discovered I’d been suckered into celebrating my own birthdays with “birthday soup” and had lost a few pounds of perfectly good candy to somebody’s flowerpot. The good news is that while my friends were totally decompensating as their entire theological framework went up the chimney, I was eating cake.

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The Beguiling Aroma of Pandan

Vanilla might be the most pervasive dessert flavor in Western cultures, but in Southeast Asia, where I live, there’s another ingredient that trumps vanilla in its ubiquity and in being, well, just as basic as vanilla. I’m talking about pandan.
Pandan—…

Vanilla might be the most pervasive dessert flavor in Western cultures, but in Southeast Asia, where I live, there’s another ingredient that trumps vanilla in its ubiquity and in being, well, just as basic as vanilla. I’m talking about pandan.

Pandan—the more common term for pandanus amaryllifolius, a species of screwpine shrub—is a plant with long, slender leaves. Imagine the languid leaf segments of a palm tree bundled up into a waist-high shrub—that’s what pandan looks like. It’s sometimes referred to as “Asian vanilla,” and though pandan is as popular in this region of the world as vanilla is in the rest, the similarities between the two end there.

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10 Surefire Substitutes for All-Purpose Flour

We were just as surprised as you were when, in the middle of an apocalyptic global pandemic, everybody decided it was time to bake bread. Now walking down the baking aisle of the local supermarket can be like staring into the void, with regular old, ru…

We were just as surprised as you were when, in the middle of an apocalyptic global pandemic, everybody decided it was time to bake bread. Now walking down the baking aisle of the local supermarket can be like staring into the void, with regular old, run-of-the-mill all-purpose flour nowhere to be found. But fear not. There are plenty of alternatives to all-purpose, and we’ll walk you through the best of them. Before we get started, a bit about all-purpose flour, and why it can be tricky to imitate.


What Is All-Purpose Flour & When Should I Use It?

If Goldilocks’s porridge was made from wheat, it was made from all-purpose. A blend of soft and hard wheat, ground and refined to remove the flavorful germ and bran, AP is not too flavorful and not too fine, not too strong and not too weak (at around 9–12 percent protein, it’s just right). As such, it doesn’t overpower or clash with other flavors. It makes light cakes and pastry that would be rubbery and tough with excessive gluten development, as well as crusty breads that require gluten development for structure.

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