This Food-Inspired Apparel Brand Lets You Wear Your Snacks on Your Sleeve

This article is part of an interview series called Ladies Who (Wear) Lunch, an exploration of the intersection of food and fashion.

I’m a sucker for food puns. But I’m not the only one. Read More >>

This article is part of an interview series called Ladies Who (Wear) Lunch, an exploration of the intersection of food and fashion.

I’m a sucker for food puns. But I’m not the only one.

Read More >>

Why This Veteran Food Editor Is Breaking Into Indie Publishing

There’s nothing casual about making a magazine. I know this because up until a few years ago, I was eating, sleeping, and breathing print media as the editor of not one but two publications, Culture Cheese Magazine (my then-full-time job) and GRLSQUASH…

There’s nothing casual about making a magazine. I know this because up until a few years ago, I was eating, sleeping, and breathing print media as the editor of not one but two publications, Culture Cheese Magazine (my then-full-time job) and GRLSQUASH, my now-defunct self-funded indie mag side project. Between sticking to strict printer deadlines, managing a seemingly endless sea of freelancers, proofing until you want to cry (and inevitably missing at least a handful of typos), and somehow financing the whole endeavor—selling ads? Crowd-funding? Asking for donations?—print can feel, well, grueling. But it’s also so damn rewarding.

Once you’ve fallen in love with print it’s tough to fall out of love, which is probably why Dana Cowin is back in the publishing game, this time bolder (and broader) than ever. After a decades-long career as editor-in-chief of Food & Wine that ended in 2015, Cowin has turned to indie publishing. Speaking Broadly encapsulates her eponymous Heritage Radio Network show within its colorful, inspiring pages featuring the likes of Black Food Folks co-founder Colleen Vincent, writer and cookbook author Reem Kassis, chef Nini Nguyen, and more of the food and beverage world’s finest.

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Susan Korn Wants You To Have Your Cake & Wear It Too

This article is part of an interview series called Ladies Who (Wear) Lunch, an exploration of the intersection of food and fashion.

According to family legend, my first real word was appetizer (just ask my mom!), so it’s only fitting that food would…

This article is part of an interview series called Ladies Who (Wear) Lunch, an exploration of the intersection of food and fashion.


According to family legend, my first real word was appetizer (just ask my mom!), so it’s only fitting that food would follow me throughout my life. Folding napkins for my mom’s catering company in our family dining room as a kid evolved into part-time restaurant jobs in college, which led to a few failed food blog attempts, and eventually landed me in a graduate program founded by the original glamazon master chef herself, Julia Child, that then launched my career in food media. I don’t remember ever wanting a career in food, but looking back it seems this path was pretty inevitable.

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The Internet’s Favorite Grandpa Gardener Is Now An Author Too

In 2019, Gerald Stratford made a Twitter account to connect with other gardeners. One afternoon in 2020, he had his partner, Elizabeth, snap a few iPhone photos of Stratford proudly holding a massive bucket of potatoes he’d recently harvested from his …

In 2019, Gerald Stratford made a Twitter account to connect with other gardeners. One afternoon in 2020, he had his partner, Elizabeth, snap a few iPhone photos of Stratford proudly holding a massive bucket of potatoes he’d recently harvested from his plot in Oxfordshire, U.K. “Nothing special,” he thought, but hoped his 94 followers would enjoy the images.

Suddenly, the phone started buzzing uncontrollably. “I thought something was wrong [but] didn't know at the time how to mute it,” Stratford recalled. He hid his phone and eventually called Elizabeth’s son, Steven, to help him out. They soon discovered there was no problem with his phone: “You've gone viral with your sprouts, Gerald!” Steven explained.

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Salad Freaks Unite—Our Cookbook Is Finally Here

Too often, salads are the “sad” meal option: limp lettuce, tasteless dressing, underripe vegetables. And sometimes they’re those giant fast-casual salads, buckets of kale chopped within an inch of its life, topped with a scoop of quinoa, barely mor…



Too often, salads are the “sad” meal option: limp lettuce, tasteless dressing, underripe vegetables. And sometimes they’re those giant fast-casual salads, buckets of kale chopped within an inch of its life, topped with a scoop of quinoa, barely more appealing than the former. Jess Damuck, a food stylist and recipe developer, is out to change our perception of salad. Her new cookbook, Salad Freak: Recipes to Feed a Healthy Obsession, is all about, as she writes in the introduction, salad becoming “something of its own art form.” She explains that, in many ways, anything can be a salad. There are recipes to make a salad for any meal of the day, as something to accompany other dishes, or to be the main event—and even some that are sort of secret salads, like Caesar Salad Pizza, Yellow Gazpacho, and Carrot & Saffron Socca. “A salad can be a side dish, but it shouldn’t get stuck being an afterthought,” Damuck writes. “I eat salads first thing in the morning too—whether it’s a big bowl of citrus or thick, juicy slices of tomato—why not?”

Salad Freak is organized by the seasons: As those who’ve eaten chopped tomatoes from a salad bar in December (so, everyone?) will know, produce typically tastes best during the time of year it grows naturally. Sure, winter isn’t necessarily the best time to make a fruit salad with strawberries, just as a roasted kabocha squash salad in mid-June isn’t ideal; but chicories and citrus in January, or fresh peas in peak spring? Yes, please!

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Cheech Marin Loves Snacks, Noodles & Decriminalizing Cannabis

In The Green Scene, there’s no such thing as a silly question about cannabis. What’s the difference between THC and CBD? How the heck do I make edibles at home? What home design advice can dispensaries teach me? Kick back—we have the answers.

The go…

In The Green Scene, there's no such thing as a silly question about cannabis. What's the difference between THC and CBD? How the heck do I make edibles at home? What home design advice can dispensaries teach me? Kick back—we have the answers.


The good news is that Cheech Marin is awake. “Kind of. Sort of,” the comedy legend says, logging in over Zoom at his home on the west coast. The only bad news is—well actually, there’s no bad news to speak of for the next 40 minutes, because I’m talking with the Cheech Marin: the school bus driver, the guy who stands outside the club in Dusk Till Dawn and goes over the, um, entertainment inside; the Cheech in Cheech and Chong, the guys who mainstreamed good, fun stoner vibes into the bloodstream of America over 50 years ago.

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Katie Kimmel’s Food Art Is Forever Fun

Two hours north of Los Angeles, nestled in the Mojave desert, artist Katie Kimmel makes her magic—most of which involves food. Kimmel has generated something of a cult a following for her charmingly quirky anthropomorphic ceramic snacks and mortadella …

Two hours north of Los Angeles, nestled in the Mojave desert, artist Katie Kimmel makes her magic—most of which involves food. Kimmel has generated something of a cult a following for her charmingly quirky anthropomorphic ceramic snacks and mortadella pool float, and of course, her brightly-colored t-shirts emblazoned with bangers like “Lentil Soup,” “Mozzarella Sticks,” and “I Ate Everything and It Was Good.”

Kimmel’s latest drop of food-themed clothing, which comes out December 8—perfect timing for any December holiday gift-procrastinators—is part of her recycled collection, where Kimmel places her iconic food phrases on thrifted pieces. We caught up with Kimmel to chat about food, art, and food art.

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Sweet Potato Shakshuka

This is an untraditional but delicious take on Shakshuka with a sweet potato base and crunchy roasted sweet potato skin on top. The recipe is from the new book Shelf Love from Ottolenghi Test Kitchen.

This is an untraditional but delicious take on Shakshuka with a sweet potato base and crunchy roasted sweet potato skin on top. The recipe is from the new book Shelf Love from Ottolenghi Test Kitchen.

A New Cookbook With Old Recipes—Thanks to 70 Grandmas

A 92-year-old South African who can hold a plank while recounting the time Margaret Thatcher enjoyed her piroshkis, a 66-year-old American who’s been developing a top-secret BBQ sauce recipe for 20 years, and a 71-year-old Colombian who became a psycho…

A 92-year-old South African who can hold a plank while recounting the time Margaret Thatcher enjoyed her piroshkis, a 66-year-old American who’s been developing a top-secret BBQ sauce recipe for 20 years, and a 71-year-old Colombian who became a psychoanalyst after daily talks over chicken, corn, and potato soup with her landlady. These are just a few of the stories in Anastasia Miari and Iska Lupton’s Grand Dishes, a new cookbook spanning three continents, 10 countries, and 70 grandmothers.

Miari, a journalist, and Lupton, a food stylist, began Grand Dishes as a crowdfunded side project to document their own grandmothers’ recipes. Soon, they found themselves on a four-year journey around the world, learning recipes and conversing with women in French, Spanish, Greek, and Italian, plus some gesticulating and giggling in Russian. Through it all, the two learned each woman’s secret ingredient to a hearty meal and happy life. Mirai and Lupton talked with us about food as a mode of storytelling, the importance of highlighting older women, and what it means to cook with context.

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Is There Anything Triple-Cream Cheese Can’t Do?

Every month, Melina Hammer, Food52’s very own Hudson Valley correspondent, is serving up all the bounty that upstate New York has to offer.

I have long loved triple-cream cheeses. They contain at least 75 percent fat, and are typically young. They a…

Every month, Melina Hammer, Food52's very own Hudson Valley correspondent, is serving up all the bounty that upstate New York has to offer.


I have long loved triple-cream cheeses. They contain at least 75 percent fat, and are typically young. They are also supremely spreadable. Mascarpone is an example of a fresh triple-cream, whereas Brillat-Savarin, Explorateur, and St. André are soft-ripened. Think of this sort of cheese as an extra luxurious, extra creamy Brie—velvety, decadent, and easy to combine with savory or sweet pairings. France has historically cornered the market on triple-cream cheeses (they originated there in the 19th century), but today there are several wonderful ones made in the United States. So when I discovered a triple-cream being produced right in my own region, I had to learn more. Meet Four Fat Fowl, an award-winning creamery—then get cooking. (This interview has been edited and condensed for length and clarity.)

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