Quick Pickled Red Onions

Tart, tangy, and fantastically fuchsia, these pickled red onions are quick and easy and stored in the fridge, no canning required! Pickled red onions are the perfect garnish for just about anything, from tacos to burgers to grilled chicken and more. They add bright flavor and a kick of acid to any dish they embellish. […]

The post Quick Pickled Red Onions first appeared on Love and Olive Oil.

Tart, tangy, and fantastically fuchsia, these pickled red onions are quick and easy and stored in the fridge, no canning required!

Pickled red onions are the perfect garnish for just about anything, from tacos to burgers to grilled chicken and more. They add bright flavor and a kick of acid to any dish they embellish.

Two jars of pickled red onions in glass jars on a marble background

Technically, I’ve posted quick pickled red onion recipes before, but always as a part of another recipe (like these pulled pork tacos or these loaded nachos).

But the thing is, this recipe is so easy and so versatile, it really deserves a post of its own.

Two lidded glass mason jars filled with Quick Pickled Red Onions

This is a very basic recipe, with little more than salt, sugar, peppercorns and vinegar.

Consider this a foundation for flavor, if you will. It’s perfect as is, but if you’re feeling frisky can mix it up with some fresh garlic cloves, maybe a sliced red chili or pepper flakes for a bit of spice, mustard seeds or some fresh herbs, even. Or maybe add a spoonful of gochujang for a kimchi-like twist.

You can also mix and match vinegars here. I like to use half white vinegar and half cider vinegar, but red wine vinegar would be lovely as would a little bit of champagne, rice vinegar or even a small splash of balsamic (though you would muddy the gorgeous garnet hue of the onions with that last one.)

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Homemade Everything Crackers

Ultra thin and crispy crackers topped with a homemade everything bagel seasoning blend that’ll have your tastebuds demanding more. Homemade crackers are the ultimate snack, and these ultra-crispy, everything bagel-inspired delights are no exception. Top them with a smear of cream cheese and a dollop of pepper jelly or a slice of smoked salmon for […]

The post Homemade Everything Crackers first appeared on Love and Olive Oil.

Ultra thin and crispy crackers topped with a homemade everything bagel seasoning blend that’ll have your tastebuds demanding more.

Homemade crackers are the ultimate snack, and these ultra-crispy, everything bagel-inspired delights are no exception. Top them with a smear of cream cheese and a dollop of pepper jelly or a slice of smoked salmon for a truly delectable combination!

Broken pieces of Homemade Everything Crackers with small bowl of everything spice.

With this year’s bread baking boom it’s no surprise that my most popular recipe of the year was these homemade sourdough crackers. I regularly get tagged in Instagram posts and stories when folks make the crackers, using all manner of creative seasoning combinations. (Also, can I just say that seeing folks making my recipes is by far the best part of this job, it makes me smile every time!!)

I’ve been wanting to do a non-sourdough version of these crackers for some time now. If you think about it, sourdough starter is just equal parts flour and water, so converting the recipe is just a matter of some simple math.

You’ll definitely notice a difference in flavor if you compared the sourdough vs non-sourdough crackers directly. The sourdough ones taste distinctly like wheat thins to me (weird, but true), regular crackers rely more on the seasoning and mix-ins for flavor. Still, they’re no less delicious.

Stack of unbroken Everything crackers on a wire rack

These homemade crackers are ridiculously simple, made with little more than flour, water, and olive oil (I also added a bit of honey to give them that subtle bagel-like sweetness, barley malt syrup would be lovely as well). After a brief respite, they are then rolled super thin (pasta roller FTW), topped with a generous layer of everything bagel seasoning, and baked to crispy perfection.

If you did want to use some leftover sourdough discard, simply replace and equal amount of flour and water with your 100% hydration starter (for example, if you have 100g of starter, replace 50g of flour and 50g of water). And yes, a digital scale makes all this math so much easier (in case you’re stymied by the weird flour measurements in the recipe, just use a scale please).

You can ultimately season the crackers with whatever spices you like (I used herbs de provence in the original recipe, za’atar is also a popular option a lot of folks rave about). Here I oped to go for everything, mixing up my own everything bagel blend.

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Weight vs Volume Measurements in Baking and the Best Way to Measure Flour

When it comes to baking, accuracy in your measurements is critical to a recipe’s success, and the single most accurate way to measure your ingredients is by weight. I’ve received a few questions lately on some of my more popular cake recipes that seem to imply some confusion about weight versus volume measurements, specifically when […]

When it comes to baking, accuracy in your measurements is critical to a recipe’s success, and the single most accurate way to measure your ingredients is by weight.

I’ve received a few questions lately on some of my more popular cake recipes that seem to imply some confusion about weight versus volume measurements, specifically when it comes to measuring dry ingredients like flour. I figured I’d do a bit more in-depth explanation in a post, to hopefully clear up any confusion.

Scooping flour out of a glass canister

American bakers grew up using cups, where a cup of water is equal to a cup of flour and so forth. We also had it drilled into our brains that a cup is 8 ounces and a pint is a pound the world round (a pint being two cups or 16 fluid ounces).

But I’m here to say that a pint is NOT always a pound and a cup is NOT always 8 ounces—it depends on what you’re measuring.

Now before you start arguing, let me explain!

Weight versus Volume

Volume is a measure of the amount of space something takes up. Things like cups of flour, gallons of milk, cubic feet of helium… these are all volume measurements.

Weight is a measurement of an object’s heaviness. Grams of salt, pounds of sugar, kilograms of apples… these are measurements of weight.

Ok. So, that makes sense, right? Volume and weight are measuring two entirely different things.

You’ve heard the old riddle: Which weighs more: a pound of feathers or a pound of lead?

Trick question: they both weigh a pound! BUT the lead is going to have a much smaller volume since it is more dense than the feathers, so it will look like a smaller amount of material.

When we’re talking about baking, the differences might not be quite as apparent as feathers and lead, but the same is true of flour and water: one is much less dense than the other (in this case the flour is the feathers and the water is the lead). So a pound of flour is going to take up more space, or volume, than an equivalent pound of water.

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