Sourdough Pumpkin Bread (Vegan)

Having recently revived my sourdough starter, my collection of sourdough discard has started up again. Since it’s the spooky season (a.k.a October), it only felt appropriate to make a vegan pumpkin bread version of my sourdough banana bread!! Using homemade pumpkin puree I had planned on doing this a few weeks ago but found I there was NO CANNED PUMPKIN PUREE in stock anywhere near me & ordering it online would’ve cost £3 a tin! Who’s buying up all the canned pumpkin!? Anywho, I’m no stranger to making my own purees so I went ahead and bought a cooking pumpkin, cut it in half & roasted for an hour then scooped the flesh out & blended it up to make some puree. However I found that this homemade puree was much more watery than the canned puree so the loaf turned out gummy and crumbly. An intense few weeks of shoots got in the way but this week I got round to retesting it with homemade pumpkin puree which I strained in a cheesecloth-lined strainer set over a bowl for 3 hours. I also gathered up the edges of the cheesecloth after this time and gently squeezed until no more […]

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sourdough pumpkin bread sliced with a cup of tea

Having recently revived my sourdough starter, my collection of sourdough discard has started up again. Since it’s the spooky season (a.k.a October), it only felt appropriate to make a vegan pumpkin bread version of my sourdough banana bread!!

a loaf of vegan sourdough pumpkin bread with tea being poured and winter squash

Using homemade pumpkin puree

I had planned on doing this a few weeks ago but found I there was NO CANNED PUMPKIN PUREE in stock anywhere near me & ordering it online would’ve cost £3 a tin! Who’s buying up all the canned pumpkin!? Anywho, I’m no stranger to making my own purees so I went ahead and bought a cooking pumpkin, cut it in half & roasted for an hour then scooped the flesh out & blended it up to make some puree. However I found that this homemade puree was much more watery than the canned puree so the loaf turned out gummy and crumbly.

An intense few weeks of shoots got in the way but this week I got round to retesting it with homemade pumpkin puree which I strained in a cheesecloth-lined strainer set over a bowl for 3 hours. I also gathered up the edges of the cheesecloth after this time and gently squeezed until no more water was coming out. This resulted in a texture which was much more like the canned pumpkin puree I buy. I tried it in a loaf and it worked a treat!!

a sliced sourdough pumpkin loaf on a plate with a cup of tea

Luckily, I’d had a conversation with someone on my IG DMs about converting my banana bread into a a pumpkin bread (shout out to Kelsey!!). She actually tested the recipe too – telling me her changes of increasing the sugar slightly & lowering the pumpkin slightly – and declared it a success 🙂 I’ve made it both with 150g sugar and 200g sugar and they both work out so it’s up to you and your preferred level of sweetness.

As well as these changes, I made a custom pumpkin spice blend for the cake with cinnamon, nutmeg, cloves & ginger for that Autumnal flavour. As I had some oranges to hand, I grated in some zest too as I always find it helps to round out the spices in things like carrot cakes & pumpkin breads. This is such a delicious, soft loaf and is VERY moreish. Perfect for a cuppa as an afternoon snack!

Other sourdough discard recipes

Sourdough Pumpkin Bread (Vegan)

Sourdough Pumpkin Bread (Vegan)

Yield: 1 loaf (serves 12)

A warmly spiced vegan pumpkin bread which uses sourdough discard!

Ingredients

  • 200g (3/4 cup plus 1 tbsp) pumpkin puree* (SEE NOTES if using homemade)
  • 150g (3/4 cup) to 200g (1 cup) light brown sugar*
  • 90g (1/3 cup + 2 tsp) neutral oil or light olive oil
  • 2 tsp ground cinnamon
  • 1/2 tsp freshly grated nutmeg
  • 1/2 tsp ground ginger
  • 1/8 tsp ground cloves
  • zest of 1 orange, finely grated
  • 1/4 tsp fine table salt
  • 150g (3/4 cup) sourdough starter/discard (100% hydration)
  • 120g (1 cup) plain white (all-purpose) flour
  • 1 tsp bicarbonate of soda (baking soda)

Topping (optional):

  • 2 tbsp light brown sugar
  • 3 tbsp pumpkin seeds/pepitas

Instructions

  1. Preheat the oven to 180°C fan (350°F). Grease a 2lb loaf tin with some oil and line with a sling of baking paper.
  2. In a large bowl, mix the pumpkin puree, sugar, oil, spices, orange zest and salt until smooth. Stir in the sourdough starter. Lastly, add the flour and bicarbonate of soda. Fold together until just combined.
  3. Pour the batter into your lined loaf tin. Sprinkle with the topping of light brown sugar and pumpkin seeds, if using.
  4. Bake for 55-70 minutes - a toothpick inserted into the centre should come out clean. If the loaf looks like it's browning too much but is not cooked through yet, tent the top with foil for the last 20 minutes of baking.
  5. Allow to cool before removing from the tin, slicing & serving.

Notes

Adapted from my Sourdough Banana Bread (vegan)

Amount of sugar: use 150g for a slightly less sweet loaf or 200g if you prefer things sweeter

If using homemade pumpkin puree: it is essential that your pumpkin puree is drained before weighing & using in this recipe. To do this, line a sieve (mesh strainer) set over a bowl with 2 layers of cheesecloth. Fill with your homemade pumpkin puree and leave to drain for 2-3 hours. After this time, gather up the edges of the cheesecloth and twist together at the top. Gently squeeze the bundle of puree to remove any last bit of water - don't squeeze too hard or the puree may start to seep through the cheesecloth! The texture should be very thick just like canned pumpkin puree. You can now measure it out and use it in the recipe.

To make homemade pumpkin puree: cut your pumpkin in half. Place cut side down on a baking tray and roast at 180C fan (350F) for 1-2 hours until completely soft. Remove from the oven, flip over and scoop out the seeds then discard them. Scoop the flesh into a blender/food processor/bowl with sitck blender, discard the skin. Blitz the flesh until smooth then drain as instructed above.

What is 100% hydration sourdough starter? This means that when feeding your starter, you're using an equal weight of flour & water (e.g. feeding it with 50g flour & 50g water each time).

Non-Vegan option: use 100g butter, melted, in place of the oil.

Have you made this recipe?
I’d love to see how it went! Tag me on instagram @izyhossack and hashtag it #topwithcinnamon so I can have a look & reshare in my stories!

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Caramelised Banana Buckwheat Bread

Thanks to Doves Farm for sponsoring this post. Doves Farm has a new feel-good, colourful look, which celebrates the joy of home baking. To celebrate this, I’m sharing 2 of my favourite feel-good recipes. Banana bread must be one of the most well-loved things to bake in the UK! It’s not surprising though as it’s such a simple thing to make and uses up those brown bananas from the fruit bowl or freezer. When I was growing up my mum would bake a simple banana bread, often with walnuts and demerara sugar on top for crunch. We’d eat slices of it with cream cheese as a comforting afternoon snack. It’s such a classic, easy bake which everyone loves, which makes it ideal as a feel-good gift for friends and family. Over the years I’ve made many iterations of banana bread. One of my favourite little twists to do is to swap out a portion of the plain flour for Doves Farm organic wholemeal buckwheat flour. I find this makes for a very tender, light banana bread with a nutty, earthy flavour which goes so well with the sweetness of the bananas. Due to the lack of gluten in buckwheat flour, […]

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Thanks to Doves Farm for sponsoring this post. Doves Farm has a new feel-good, colourful look, which celebrates the joy of home baking. To celebrate this, I’m sharing 2 of my favourite feel-good recipes.

Banana bread must be one of the most well-loved things to bake in the UK! It’s not surprising though as it’s such a simple thing to make and uses up those brown bananas from the fruit bowl or freezer. When I was growing up my mum would bake a simple banana bread, often with walnuts and demerara sugar on top for crunch. We’d eat slices of it with cream cheese as a comforting afternoon snack. It’s such a classic, easy bake which everyone loves, which makes it ideal as a feel-good gift for friends and family.

Over the years I’ve made many iterations of banana bread. One of my favourite little twists to do is to swap out a portion of the plain flour for Doves Farm organic wholemeal buckwheat flour. I find this makes for a very tender, light banana bread with a nutty, earthy flavour which goes so well with the sweetness of the bananas. Due to the lack of gluten in buckwheat flour, I like to combine it with a small amount of plain white flour to help the loaf hold together well.

This batter is super easy to blend up so takes little time to prep. I use really ripe, frozen bananas which I’ve let defrost at room temp until they’re completely soft. They usually seep some liquid when this happens so make sure they’re in a shallow bowl of some kind as you don’t want to lose any of that moisture!

I sprinkled some buckwheat groats onto the cake batter before baking which crisp up in the oven for an easy, crunchy topping to the cake – delicious but optional! You can always replace the buckwheat groat sprinkle with some roughly chopped walnuts or pecans.

Stockists for Doves Farm Organic Wholemeal Buckwheat Flour are Morrisons, Ocado, Sainsbury’s, Tesco, Waitrose & Partners, dovesfarm.co.uk


Caramelised Banana Buckwheat Bread

Yield: serves 12-16

A vegan caramelised banana loaf cake made with nutty buckwheat flour & topped with crispy crunchy buckwheat groats

Ingredients

Banana Buckwheat Batter:

Caramelised bananas:

  • 1 or 2 small, ripe bananas
  • 30g (2 tbsp) unsalted butter or vegan butter
  • 2 tbsp maple syrup
  • Pinch of ground cinnamon
  • 2 tbsp buckwheat groats, optional

Instructions

  1. Preheat the oven to 180°C fan (350°F). Grease and line an 8-inch square cake tin or a 2lb loaf tin with baking paper.
  2. Place the overripe bananas, sugar, oil, salt and cloves into a blender or food processor and blitz until smooth (or alternatively use a stick blender in a large bowl to blitz together). Add the flours and bicarbonate of soda and blend again to combine.
  3. Pour the batter into your prepared cake tin and set aside.

For the caramelised bananas:

  1. Peel your 1 or 2 ripe bananas (I like to use 1 if I’m making a loaf cake or 2 if I’m baking a square cake) and slice in half down their length.
  2. Heat the butter, maple syrup and cinnamon in a medium non-stick frying pan over a medium heat. Once the butter has fully melted, add the bananas cut side-down into the frying pan. Fry for a couple of minutes until the undersides start to get a bit golden.
  3. Gently lift the bananas from the pan, taking care not to touch the hot caramel. Place them, cut side-up onto the cake batter. Drizzle over any remaining caramel from the pan then sprinkle on the buckwheat groats (if using).
  4. Bake for 25-30 minutes (if baking in a square tin) or 50-60
    minutes (if baking in a loaf tin)
    until a toothpick inserted into the centre of the cake comes out clean.

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Meyer Lemon Poppyseed Loaf

Meyer Lemon Poppyseed Loaf
Meyer lemons are always a favorite of mine when it comes to baked goods. The citrus – which is in season all year round – is less acidic than other lemons, meaning that it has a wonderful lemon flavor yet seems to be a touch sweeter than most lemons. This Meyer Lemon Poppyseed …

The post Meyer Lemon Poppyseed Loaf appeared first on Baking Bites.

Meyer Lemon Poppyseed Loaf
Meyer lemons are always a favorite of mine when it comes to baked goods. The citrus – which is in season all year round – is less acidic than other lemons, meaning that it has a wonderful lemon flavor yet seems to be a touch sweeter than most lemons. This Meyer Lemon Poppyseed Loaf is a delicious way to put meyer lemons to good use. It is a moist and easy to make quick bread that is bursting with lemon flavor in every bite, accented by the subtle crunch of poppyseeds.

The bread is easy to put together and features both lemon zest and lemon juice. Most of the lemon flavor comes from the citrus zest, which is the colorful exterior of a citrus fruit. The zest is loaded with lemon oil, a potent flavoring agent. You’ll want to use a microplane to quickly and efficiently remove the zest from the fruit. Once you have zested the lemon, combine it with sugar – which will rub even more oil out of it as you mix the two together – and the rest of the ingredients in the batter. There is a small amount of lemon juice in the batter, as well as some in the glaze.

The lemon glaze that is used in this recipe is very easy to make and a little bit different than most of the other glazes that I make. It is made with lemon juice and granulated sugar, and it is spooned directly onto the hot loaf when it comes out of the oven. The lemon juice will kind of soak into the loaf, while the lemon-flavored sugar sits on top. As the loaf cools, the juice will be absorbed – making the loaf moist – while the sugar forms a subtle crust on top. It has a really bright flavor and a hint of crunch, which makes it particularly delicious!

You can use regular lemons for this recipe for a more traditional lemon poppyseed loaf. It will be just as delicious, with a slightly different (and still very lemony!) flavor profile from the meyer lemon version. The loaf is ready to eat as soon as it has cooled and you should allow it to cool completely before slicing it to allow the lemon glaze to set.

Meyer Lemon Poppyseed Loaf
2 1/3 cups all purpose flour
1 tsp baking powder
1/2 tsp baking soda
1/2 tsp salt
1 cup sugar
1 1/2 tbsp meyer lemon zest
1 large egg
1/2 tsp vanilla extract
1/3 cup vegetable oil
3/4 cup buttermilk
1/4 cup meyer lemon juice
1 tbsp poppyseeds

Drizzle
2 tbsp meyer lemon juice
1/4 cup granulated sugar

Preheat oven to 350F. Lightly grease a 9×5-inch loaf pan and the base of the loaf pan with parchment paper to minimize sticking.
In a medium bowl, whisk together flour, baking powder, baking soda and salt.
In a large bowl, whisk together sugar, lemon zest, egg and vanilla extract. Stir in vegetable oil and whisk until completely incorporated. Stir in half of the flour mixture, followed by the buttermilk and lemon juice. Stir in the remaining flour mixture and the poppyseeds and mix until batter is uniform. Pour into prepared pan.
Bake for 55-60 minutes, or until a toothpick inserted into the center of the loaf pan comes out with only a few moist crumbs attached and the top springs back when lightly pressed.

While the loaf is baking, prepare the drizzle by combining lemon juice and granulated sugar in a small bowl. When the loaf comes out of the oven. us a spoon to drizzle the sugar mixture evenly over the top of the loaf. Do not pierce loaf, simply allow the mixture to soak in as the loaf cools.
When cooled, remove loaf from pan and slice to serve.

Makes 1 loaf; serves 8-12.

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Marble Cake (+ Vegan option) – Baking Basics

Chocolate and vanilla cake batter, swirled together to make a deliciously simple cake! This recipe uses oil and real chocolate for a moist, rich flavour and only needs 2 eggs! (There’s also a vegan option for those who want to make it without butter or eggs). No self-raising flour or caster sugar needed either (just plain flour and granulated sugar) so it’s a quick and simple bake to make. Whoever invented marble cake is a genius, you get the best of both worlds AND they somehow taste better marble together than they do separately? A simple vanilla batter is made and divided into two portions – one portion is left plain and the other is mixed with cocoa powder/chocolate. The two colours of batter are layered into a cake tin (usually a loaf tin or bundt tin) and swirled lightly with a knife – not enough to blend the flavours together, only just so they become entangled with one another so you get a bit of both flavour in each bite. I used to make marble cake with cocoa powder in the batter but since trying it out with real chocolate melted and swirled in, I haven’t gone back. The […]

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sliced marble cake on a plate with a vase

Chocolate and vanilla cake batter, swirled together to make a deliciously simple cake! This recipe uses oil and real chocolate for a moist, rich flavour and only needs 2 eggs! (There’s also a vegan option for those who want to make it without butter or eggs). No self-raising flour or caster sugar needed either (just plain flour and granulated sugar) so it’s a quick and simple bake to make.

Slices of marble cake on a marble background

Whoever invented marble cake is a genius, you get the best of both worlds AND they somehow taste better marble together than they do separately? A simple vanilla batter is made and divided into two portions – one portion is left plain and the other is mixed with cocoa powder/chocolate. The two colours of batter are layered into a cake tin (usually a loaf tin or bundt tin) and swirled lightly with a knife – not enough to blend the flavours together, only just so they become entangled with one another so you get a bit of both flavour in each bite. I used to make marble cake with cocoa powder in the batter but since trying it out with real chocolate melted and swirled in, I haven’t gone back. The flavour is so much better when using melted choc here and, as the cake is so simple in its flavouring, I think it’s worth the extra bit of effort.

marble cake sliced on a plate

I use the reverse creaming method for this batter which means the dry ingredients are mixed with the fat first, and then the liquid ingredients are stirred in to get a smooth batter. I find this provides a nicely even, buttery crumb which is protected somewhat against overmixing so leads to a nicely spongey, moist cake. This is because the fat coats the flour granules somewhat preventing them from forming a gluten network once the liquids are added which in turn means you can mix this batter a little more aggressivly than you would a standard cake batter.

I’ve also tested this cake with vegan substitutions of vegan butter (block & tub margarine will both work – as long as they aren’t low fat). For the eggs I replaced them with blended silken tofu which I find works well in these denser cakey applications!

Marble Cake

Marble Cake

Yield: 1 (2lb) loaf

A chocolate and vanilla marble cake (Marmor kuchen) - so moist thanks to the use of oil and cornflour! There's also a vegan (egg free, dairy free) variation.

Ingredients

  • 110g (1/2 cup) unsalted butter
  • 185g (1 1/2 cups) plain white flour (all purpose flour)
  • 20g (2 tbsp) cornflour (cornstarch), see notes for substitutes
  • 1/2 tsp fine table salt
  • 65g (2.25 ounces) dark chocolate (70% cocoa solids)
  • 220g (1 cup) granulated sugar
  • 1 tsp baking powder
  • 1/4 tsp bicarbonate of soda (baking soda)
  • 165g (2/3 cup) cow's milk, soy milk or oat milk
  • 30g (2 tbsp) vegetable oil or neutral oil
  • 2 tsp vanilla extract
  • 2 medium UK eggs (large US eggs)
  • 1 tsp vinegar (see notes) or lemon juice
  • 2 tbsp brewed coffee or water

Instructions

  1. Preheat the oven to 180°C (350°F) convection. Grease and line a 2lb loaf tin with a sling of baking paper and set aside.
  2. Place the butter into a medium pot and set over a medium-low heat. Allow to melt completely then remove from the heat.
  3. As the butter is melting, place the flour, cornflour and salt in a medium bowl and stir together to combine.
  4. Pour the hot melted butter into the flour mixture and stir together until you get a sandy, slightly bobbly mixture. Add the sugar, baking powder and bicarbonate of soda and mix together well. I like to use my fingertips here to rub all the ingredients together to ensure they're all mixed and to try to break up any large lumps.
  5. Take the pot (which should still be hot) you were using for melting the butter and place the chocolate into it, off the heat. Set aside and allow the residual heat of the pot to melt the chocolate. If it hasn't fully melted after ~5 minutes, place it over a low heat and stir until fully melted then remove from the heat. Set aside - we will come back to this later.
  6. Place the milk, oil, vanilla, eggs and vinegar into a jug or small bowl and whisk together - using a fork is fine. Pour this bit by bit into the sandy flour/butter mixture, stirring together between additions (using a whisk or large fork here helps) until all the liquid has been added and the batter is mostly smooth (there may be a few lumps here & there which is fine). It's okay to mix this batter a bit more than a standard cake batter so don't be afraid to give it a good mix with the whisk.
  7. Pour 300g (1 cup) of the batter into the pot of melted chocolate (OFF THE HEAT). Add the coffee (or water) and stir together - this is your chocolate batter! The batter which is left in the bowl is your vanilla batter.
  8. Layer the chocolate batter and vanilla batter into the lined loaf tin, alternating between the two flavours (I like to do this in 6 layers i.e. 3 layers of each flavour). You can also use a butter knife to gently swirl the batter together a few times - don't go overboard here or it'll just mix the batters rather than marbling them.
  9. Bake the cake for 50-60 minutes, covering with foil in the final 10 minutes if the cake is looking too brown. A toothpick inserted into the centre of the cake should come out clean.
  10. Allow the cake to cool in the tin for 10 minutes before tipping out onto a wire rack to cool completely. Once cooled, slice and enjoy!

Notes

- No cornflour? Use 20g (2 tbsp) of extra plain white flour here instead.

- Vinegar: use a neutral vinegar here, e.g. apple cider, white wine, distilled, malt, rice vinegar. DON'T use something flavoured like balsamic/sherry/red wine vinegar.

- Vegan (egg/dairy-free) version: instead of the eggs use 100g (1/3 cup + 1 tbsp) of blended silken tofu. In place of the butter use a vegan block margarine or tub margarine (NOT low fat). Use a non-dairy milk. Ensure the chocolate you're using is dairy free.

Have you made this recipe?
I’d love to see how it went! Tag me on instagram @izyhossack and hashtag it #topwithcinnamon so I can have a look & reshare in my stories!

The post Marble Cake (+ Vegan option) – Baking Basics appeared first on Izy Hossack - Top With Cinnamon.