Pumpkin Chocolate Chip Bread

Pumpkin Chocolate Chip Bread-perfectly spiced homemade pumpkin bread with chocolate chips. Everyone’s favorite fall quick bread recipe!  I love fall for many reasons, but Pumpkin Chocolate Chip Bread is at the top of the list, along with Pumpkin C…

Pumpkin Chocolate Chip Bread-perfectly spiced homemade pumpkin bread with chocolate chips. Everyone’s favorite fall quick bread recipe!  I love fall for many reasons, but Pumpkin Chocolate Chip Bread is at the top of the list, along with Pumpkin Chocolate Chip Cookies and Pumpkin Chocolate Chip Bars. There is nothing better than pumpkin AND chocolate!  This…

The post Pumpkin Chocolate Chip Bread appeared first on Two Peas & Their Pod.

Marble Cake (+ Vegan option) – Baking Basics

Chocolate and vanilla cake batter, swirled together to make a deliciously simple cake! This recipe uses oil and real chocolate for a moist, rich flavour and only needs 2 eggs! (There’s also a vegan option for those who want to make it without butter or eggs). No self-raising flour or caster sugar needed either (just plain flour and granulated sugar) so it’s a quick and simple bake to make. Whoever invented marble cake is a genius, you get the best of both worlds AND they somehow taste better marble together than they do separately? A simple vanilla batter is made and divided into two portions – one portion is left plain and the other is mixed with cocoa powder/chocolate. The two colours of batter are layered into a cake tin (usually a loaf tin or bundt tin) and swirled lightly with a knife – not enough to blend the flavours together, only just so they become entangled with one another so you get a bit of both flavour in each bite. I used to make marble cake with cocoa powder in the batter but since trying it out with real chocolate melted and swirled in, I haven’t gone back. The […]

The post Marble Cake (+ Vegan option) – Baking Basics appeared first on Izy Hossack – Top With Cinnamon.

sliced marble cake on a plate with a vase

Chocolate and vanilla cake batter, swirled together to make a deliciously simple cake! This recipe uses oil and real chocolate for a moist, rich flavour and only needs 2 eggs! (There’s also a vegan option for those who want to make it without butter or eggs). No self-raising flour or caster sugar needed either (just plain flour and granulated sugar) so it’s a quick and simple bake to make.

Slices of marble cake on a marble background

Whoever invented marble cake is a genius, you get the best of both worlds AND they somehow taste better marble together than they do separately? A simple vanilla batter is made and divided into two portions – one portion is left plain and the other is mixed with cocoa powder/chocolate. The two colours of batter are layered into a cake tin (usually a loaf tin or bundt tin) and swirled lightly with a knife – not enough to blend the flavours together, only just so they become entangled with one another so you get a bit of both flavour in each bite. I used to make marble cake with cocoa powder in the batter but since trying it out with real chocolate melted and swirled in, I haven’t gone back. The flavour is so much better when using melted choc here and, as the cake is so simple in its flavouring, I think it’s worth the extra bit of effort.

marble cake sliced on a plate

I use the reverse creaming method for this batter which means the dry ingredients are mixed with the fat first, and then the liquid ingredients are stirred in to get a smooth batter. I find this provides a nicely even, buttery crumb which is protected somewhat against overmixing so leads to a nicely spongey, moist cake. This is because the fat coats the flour granules somewhat preventing them from forming a gluten network once the liquids are added which in turn means you can mix this batter a little more aggressivly than you would a standard cake batter.

I’ve also tested this cake with vegan substitutions of vegan butter (block & tub margarine will both work – as long as they aren’t low fat). For the eggs I replaced them with blended silken tofu which I find works well in these denser cakey applications!

Marble Cake

Marble Cake

Yield: 1 (2lb) loaf

A chocolate and vanilla marble cake (Marmor kuchen) - so moist thanks to the use of oil and cornflour! There's also a vegan (egg free, dairy free) variation.

Ingredients

  • 110g (1/2 cup) unsalted butter
  • 185g (1 1/2 cups) plain white flour (all purpose flour)
  • 20g (2 tbsp) cornflour (cornstarch), see notes for substitutes
  • 1/2 tsp fine table salt
  • 65g (2.25 ounces) dark chocolate (70% cocoa solids)
  • 220g (1 cup) granulated sugar
  • 1 tsp baking powder
  • 1/4 tsp bicarbonate of soda (baking soda)
  • 165g (2/3 cup) cow's milk, soy milk or oat milk
  • 30g (2 tbsp) vegetable oil or neutral oil
  • 2 tsp vanilla extract
  • 2 medium UK eggs (large US eggs)
  • 1 tsp vinegar (see notes) or lemon juice
  • 2 tbsp brewed coffee or water

Instructions

  1. Preheat the oven to 180°C (350°F) convection. Grease and line a 2lb loaf tin with a sling of baking paper and set aside.
  2. Place the butter into a medium pot and set over a medium-low heat. Allow to melt completely then remove from the heat.
  3. As the butter is melting, place the flour, cornflour and salt in a medium bowl and stir together to combine.
  4. Pour the hot melted butter into the flour mixture and stir together until you get a sandy, slightly bobbly mixture. Add the sugar, baking powder and bicarbonate of soda and mix together well. I like to use my fingertips here to rub all the ingredients together to ensure they're all mixed and to try to break up any large lumps.
  5. Take the pot (which should still be hot) you were using for melting the butter and place the chocolate into it, off the heat. Set aside and allow the residual heat of the pot to melt the chocolate. If it hasn't fully melted after ~5 minutes, place it over a low heat and stir until fully melted then remove from the heat. Set aside - we will come back to this later.
  6. Place the milk, oil, vanilla, eggs and vinegar into a jug or small bowl and whisk together - using a fork is fine. Pour this bit by bit into the sandy flour/butter mixture, stirring together between additions (using a whisk or large fork here helps) until all the liquid has been added and the batter is mostly smooth (there may be a few lumps here & there which is fine). It's okay to mix this batter a bit more than a standard cake batter so don't be afraid to give it a good mix with the whisk.
  7. Pour 300g (1 cup) of the batter into the pot of melted chocolate (OFF THE HEAT). Add the coffee (or water) and stir together - this is your chocolate batter! The batter which is left in the bowl is your vanilla batter.
  8. Layer the chocolate batter and vanilla batter into the lined loaf tin, alternating between the two flavours (I like to do this in 6 layers i.e. 3 layers of each flavour). You can also use a butter knife to gently swirl the batter together a few times - don't go overboard here or it'll just mix the batters rather than marbling them.
  9. Bake the cake for 50-60 minutes, covering with foil in the final 10 minutes if the cake is looking too brown. A toothpick inserted into the centre of the cake should come out clean.
  10. Allow the cake to cool in the tin for 10 minutes before tipping out onto a wire rack to cool completely. Once cooled, slice and enjoy!

Notes

- No cornflour? Use 20g (2 tbsp) of extra plain white flour here instead.

- Vinegar: use a neutral vinegar here, e.g. apple cider, white wine, distilled, malt, rice vinegar. DON'T use something flavoured like balsamic/sherry/red wine vinegar.

- Vegan (egg/dairy-free) version: instead of the eggs use 100g (1/3 cup + 1 tbsp) of blended silken tofu. In place of the butter use a vegan block margarine or tub margarine (NOT low fat). Use a non-dairy milk. Ensure the chocolate you're using is dairy free.

Have you made this recipe?
I’d love to see how it went! Tag me on instagram @izyhossack and hashtag it #topwithcinnamon so I can have a look & reshare in my stories!

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Lemon Yoghurt Pot Cake (Eggless)

Using an empty yoghurt pot as a measuring tool is a genius hack to do when you don’t have any kitchen scales! It’s all about the proportions of ingredients here so I’ve given the recipe in ‘pots’ (1 pot being a 100ml yoghurt pot) but also in weights for those who do have kitchen scales. Lemon cake is always a strong favourite of mine and here it’s made extra moist with the addition of yoghurt, ground almonds and a good soaking of lemon syrup. That little extra step of pouring zippy lemon syrup over a hot cake is really what lights this cake up. You get an excellent flavour from it with that sweet-sour tang, plus a syrupy moistness throughout the loaf.

The post Lemon Yoghurt Pot Cake (Eggless) appeared first on Izy Hossack – Top With Cinnamon.

eggless lemon yoghurt pot cake with a slice cut on a plate

Using an empty yoghurt pot as a measuring tool is a genius hack to do when you don’t have any kitchen scales! It’s all about the proportions of ingredients here so I’ve given the recipe in ‘pots’ (1 pot being a 100ml yoghurt pot) but also in weights for those who do have kitchen scales.

eggless lemon cake sliced on a plate

Lemon cake is always a strong favourite of mine and here it’s made extra moist with the addition of yoghurt, ground almonds and a good soaking of lemon syrup. That little extra step of pouring zippy lemon syrup over a hot cake is really what lights this cake up. You get an excellent flavour from it with that sweet-sour tang, plus a syrupy moistness throughout the loaf.

Lemon Yoghurt Pot Cake (Eggless)

Lemon Yoghurt Pot Cake (Eggless)

Yield: 1 loaf cake
Prep Time: 15 minutes
Cook Time: 50 minutes
Total Time: 1 hour 5 minutes

Ingredients

  • a (100g) pot of honey yoghurt
  • 1 pot (100ml) water
  • 1 pot (100ml) light olive oil
  • 2 pots (200g) granulated sugar
  • zest of 2 lemons, finely grated
  • 3 pots (175g) plain white flour
  • 2 pots (90g) ground almonds
  • 1 tsp baking powder
  • 1/4 tsp bicarbonate of soda
  • 1/4 tsp fine table salt
  • Syrup:
  • 1 pot (100g) granulated sugar
  • 3/4 pot (70ml) lemon juice

Instructions

  1. Line a 2lb loaf tin with baking paper. Preheat the oven to 180C (350F) fan or 200C (400F) non-fan.
  2. Empty the contents of the 100g yoghurt pot into a medium bowl. Rinse the yoghurt pot out and dry it - you can now use it as a measuring tool for the rest of the recipe (or stick to the weights given if you prefer).
  3. To the bowl of yoghurt add the water, oil, sugar and lemon zest.
  4. Add in the flour, ground almonds, baking powder, bicarbonate of soda and salt. Stir until you get a mostly smooth batter.
  5. Pour into the loaf tin and bake for 50-60 minutes until a toothpick inserted into the centre of the cake comes out clean. It will probably sink a bit as it cools, this is okay!
  6. As the cake is cooking, combine the syrup ingredients (lemon juice and sugar) in a small pot. Bring to the boil on the stove over a medium-low heat. Simmer for 2-3 minutes until slightly reduced and syrupy.
  7. Poke holes in the baked cake while it is still hot and in the loaf tin. Pour the syrup all over the warm cake and leave to cool before removing from the tin, slicing and serving.

Notes

Vegan option: use a dairy-free, soy-based yoghurt here.

The post Lemon Yoghurt Pot Cake (Eggless) appeared first on Izy Hossack - Top With Cinnamon.

Sourdough Banana Bread (vegan)

After going on my sourdough brownie quest last year, I then ended up adding sourdough starter into other bakes to see what would work. The next thing I tried was a banana bread – I subbed some into Milli Taylors IG-famous banana bread but it didn’t seem right in the context of such a buttery loaf. I then tried it out in my regular banana bread which I thought was a much better fit. By that point, I had run out of bananas and completely abandoned my banana bread experiment! Fast forward to now when everyone is baking either sourdough or banana bread and it seemed like it would be the right time to pick my testing back up! I used a vegan banana bread recipe from my first book and altered things to make use of my discard which had been collecting in the fridge. It worked fabulously and I tried it a few more times, changing and testing a few things along the way. So, I have some notes! You can bake this as a loaf or as muffins. I think I prefer muffins as loaves are more prone to sinking, I find, mostly because it’s harder to […]

The post Sourdough Banana Bread (vegan) appeared first on Izy Hossack – Top With Cinnamon.

a loaf of vegan sourdough banana bread on an oval plate

After going on my sourdough brownie quest last year, I then ended up adding sourdough starter into other bakes to see what would work. The next thing I tried was a banana bread – I subbed some into Milli Taylors IG-famous banana bread but it didn’t seem right in the context of such a buttery loaf. I then tried it out in my regular banana bread which I thought was a much better fit. By that point, I had run out of bananas and completely abandoned my banana bread experiment!

unbaked sourdough banana bread batter topped with slices of fresh banana

Fast forward to now when everyone is baking either sourdough or banana bread and it seemed like it would be the right time to pick my testing back up! I used a vegan banana bread recipe from my first book and altered things to make use of my discard which had been collecting in the fridge. It worked fabulously and I tried it a few more times, changing and testing a few things along the way. So, I have some notes!

a few slices and a loaf of vegan sourdough banana bread

  1. You can bake this as a loaf or as muffins. I think I prefer muffins as loaves are more prone to sinking, I find, mostly because it’s harder to tell when a loaf is baked! Also loaf tins vary WILDLY so the baking times can vary a lot more. Muffins seem to be more consistent but it’s up to you and your preferences/which baking tins you own. If you’re a beginner baker and have a muffin tin, I would opt for them first, then try a loaf out another time.
  2. You can leave the batter in the fridge to actually ferment. Leaving it for ~6 hours seems to make it taste sweeter but an overnight rest (8-12 hours) means you get more of a tang in there.
  3. You can use many types of flour in the batter, as long as your sourdough is a mostly wheat-based starter (I use a 50:50 white wheat flour : dark rye flour blend for my starter). I’ve tried this with just buckwheat, a mixture of buckwheat & gram flour, and just straight up plain white flour and they all worked well.
  4. I like to decorate the top of a banana bread loaf with a sliced banana which is definitely optional and is mostly for aesthetics. I also sprinkle the top with demerara sugar for that crispy crust and that’s also optional (but recommended!!) – make sure you sprinkle a good amount on the sliced banana surface so they get nicely caramelised in the oven.
sliced sourdough vegan banana bread

Sourdough Banana Bread (vegan option)

Sourdough Banana Bread (vegan option)

Yield: 1 (2lb) loaf
Prep Time: 10 minutes
Cook Time: 1 hour
Total Time: 1 hour 10 minutes

Ingredients

  • 2 medium or 3 small overripe bananas (220-240g peeled weight* see notes for cups and for if you don't have enough banana)
  • 150g (3/4 cup) light brown sugar, granulated sugar or caster sugar
  • 90g (1/3 cup + 2 tsp) neutral oil or light olive oil
  • 1 tsp ground cinnamon
  • 1/4 tsp fine table salt
  • 150g (3/4 cup) sourdough starter/discard (100% hydration)
  • 120g (1 cup) plain white flour (see notes for subs)
  • 1 tsp bicarbonate of soda (baking soda)

Topping (optional):

  • 1 small banana, peeled & halved down its length
  • 2 tbsp demerara (raw) sugar

Instructions

  1. Preheat the oven to 180°C fan (350°F) / 200°C non-fan (400°F). Grease a 2lb loaf tin with some oil and line with a sling of baking paper.


Hand mixing method:

  1. Peel the bananas and place onto a large plate or cutting board. Use the back of a fork to mash them until you get a glossy paste which only has a few small lumps remaining. Scrape all of the mashed banana into a medium bowl.
  2. Add the sugar, oil, cinnamon and salt. Stir together until smooth.
  3. Add the sourdough starter, flour and bicarbonate of soda (baking soda) to the bowl. Stir together until combined but try not to overmix.


Food processor mixing method:

  1. Add the bananas, sugar, oil, cinnamon and salt to the bowl of the food processor. Blitz until smooth. Add the sourdough starter, flour and bicarbonate of soda (baking soda) and blitz until just combined. Scrape down the sides of the food processor to make sure everything is incorporated


Bake the loaf:

  1. Pour the batter into the prepared loaf tin. If using the toppings, decorate the top of the loaf with the sliced bananas (placing them on cut side-up) and sprinkle the top of the batter all over with the demerara sugar. Put the loaf tin on a baking tray (I like to do this just in case any batter overflows).
  2. Bake for 55-70 minutes until a toothpick inserted into the centre of the loaf comes out clean - try to avoid the sliced banana on top when inserting the toothpick so you're only testing the batter. If the loaf looks like it's browning too much but is not cooked through yet, tent the top with foil for the last 20 minutes of baking.
  3. Allow to cool before removing from the tin, slicing and serving.


For muffins:

  1. Line a 12-cup muffin tin with paper muffin liners. Divide the batter among the muffin liners. You can sprinkle the tops with demerara sugar and coins of banana, if you'd like.
  2. Bake for 25-30 minutes, until a toothpick inserted into the centre of the muffins comes out clean

Notes

Mashed bananas - cups measurement: the volume of banana needed, once mashed into a glossy paste, should be around 3/4 cup plus 2 or 3 tablespoons (i.e. a scant cup).

If you don't have enough banana, make up the missing weight/volume with some yoghurt (non-dairy if you're vegan).

Fermented version: if you want that tang of sourdough here, combine all the ingredients EXCEPT the bicarbonate of soda as instructed. Leave the batter for 8-12 hours in the fridge. Once ready to bake, preheat your oven and stir the baking soda into the batter. Bake as usual. The resting period allows the sourdough microorganisms to ferment the sugars in the batter to form acid which will give your loaf a bit more tang!

Non-Vegan option: use 100g butter, melted, in place of the oil.

Flour: you can use a blend here or even an alt flour. I've used all buckwheat flour and all chickpea flour before which has worked well. I think rye or spelt flour (and obviously wholemeal pastry flour) would also work. The main flours I would avoid for this would be any type of bread flour which will make the loaf too dense. Please ask me if you need help with substitutions!

Sourdough starter: I have a 100% hydration, wheat & rye sourdough starter. I save up the discard in the fridge for a few weeks and then bake with it for this banana bread (so your starter doesn't need to be recently fed in order to make this recipe).

The post Sourdough Banana Bread (vegan) appeared first on Izy Hossack - Top With Cinnamon.

Easy No Knead Bread

This homemade no knead bread will wow everyone! It’s so easy to make and has the best flavor, crispy crust, and chewy interior. Great for beginners! Want to bake easy homemade bread, but not sure where to start? Try this best no knead bread recipe! Your friends and family will sing your praises. Neighbors following the wafting smell will come flocking. You’ll get multiple marriage proposals. Yes, this bread is life changing! It’s got the best flavor: lightly tangy and robust. The exterior is the perfect crisp crust, and the interior has the perfect moist chewiness. Even better: it’s our easiest bread recipe yet. If you’re a bread baking beginner, this is the place to start. Want an even quicker loaf bread? Try our Easy Homemade Bread or Easy Whole Wheat Bread, which are made with a loaf pan and take just 2.5 hours. How to make no knead bread: an overview! Here’s the basic outline of what you’re getting yourself into with no knead bread. The process takes 5 minutes the night before, and then about 2 hours the day of. Compared to our sourdough bread and even our artisan bread, it’s the quickest and easiest bread recipe we have. (But if you want to […]

A Couple Cooks – Healthy, Whole Food, & Vegetarian Recipes

This homemade no knead bread will wow everyone! It’s so easy to make and has the best flavor, crispy crust, and chewy interior. Great for beginners!

No knead bread

Want to bake easy homemade bread, but not sure where to start? Try this best no knead bread recipe! Your friends and family will sing your praises. Neighbors following the wafting smell will come flocking. You’ll get multiple marriage proposals. Yes, this bread is life changing! It’s got the best flavor: lightly tangy and robust. The exterior is the perfect crisp crust, and the interior has the perfect moist chewiness. Even better: it’s our easiest bread recipe yet. If you’re a bread baking beginner, this is the place to start.

Want an even quicker loaf bread? Try our Easy Homemade Bread or Easy Whole Wheat Bread, which are made with a loaf pan and take just 2.5 hours.

How to make no knead bread: an overview!

Here’s the basic outline of what you’re getting yourself into with no knead bread. The process takes 5 minutes the night before, and then about 2 hours the day of. Compared to our sourdough bread and even our artisan bread, it’s the quickest and easiest bread recipe we have. (But if you want to make a bread recipe in one day, the artisan bread is your best option.) Here’s an outline of what you’ll have to do:

Mix, Rest overnight5 minutes active, 12 to 18 hours hands off
Shape & Proof5 minutes active, 1 hour hands off
Bake40 minutes, hands off
Cool45 minutes, hands off
Easy no knead bread

Equipment list for no knead bread

Making no knead bread requires a few tools. It’s easiest to make with a Dutch oven, but you can also use a pizza stone. There are several optional tools as well that make things easier, but are not required. Here’s what you need!

Required tools for this artisan bread recipe

  1. Large dutch oven OR pizza stone with steam (see below)
  2. Plastic bag for proofing (reuse it every time you make bread) or plastic wrap
  3. Parchment paper
  4. Lame OR sharp knife for scoring the bread
  5. Kitchen scale for measuring (optional)

The flours you’ll use

This best easy no knead bread recipe uses a mix of just two flours you’ll probably already have in your pantry. Unlike some of our other bread recipes, there’s no need for bread flour. Here’s what you’ll need:

  • All-purpose flour (for texture
  • Whole wheat flour (for flavor)
How to bake bread

Think ahead! No knead bread rests overnight

This bread requires thinking ahead 1 day ahead. You’ll need to rest the bread dough overnight. Why? Well, the answer has to do with proofing.

  • No knead bread requires only 1 proof. Proofing is simply letting the bread stand at room temperature while the leavener (yeast or sourdough) does its magic to help the bread rise. Usually a proof is about 45 minutes to 1 hour. Both our sourdough bread and artisan bread require folding and “proofing” the bread multiple times. So doing only 1 proof is almost unheard of!
  • The tradeoff? Resting overnight. Proofing is hands off, but it does require a lot of time to fold and proof multiple times. The tradeoff: you’ll need to rest the bread at room temperature overnight. To us, that’s a very worthy tradeoff! You save hours of bread making time the day of baking.

How to shape the boule

The main part of making no knead bread that requires technique is shaping the dough. You’ll shape it into a ball, called a boule. It’s easiest to learn how to shape the dough by watching. Here’s a video instruction for shaping the boule.

Homemade no knead bread

How to score the bread

See those beautiful lines on the top of the artisan bread? Those are called score lines. Scoring is slashing the top of the dough with a sharp knife to allow it to expand when baking. You can also make a decorative sort of pattern on the bread. Here are a few tips for scoring no knead bread:

  • Use your sharpest knife, or a lame. You’ll want the knife to be ultra sharp. We purchased a lame for this, since we make lots of bread recipes.
  • Make shallow cuts into the top of the dough. You want to cut just the surface — if it’s too deep it collapses, if it’s too shallow it bursts. Alex did this cross pattern for the bread scoring in this photo!

What’s a Dutch oven? Do I need it?

This easy no knead bread is best when baked in a Dutch oven. Why? Baking bread in a covered Dutch oven holds in the steam that the bread releases as it cooks. This makes an extra crispy crust & perfect rise. If you don’t have a Dutch oven, you can use a pizza stone (see below).

What is a Dutch oven? It’s a heavy cooking pot with a lid used for braising meat and making soups and stews. You can use it on the stovetop or in the oven. All Dutch ovens are made of cast iron; some have an enamel coating that makes them easier to clean.

Best no knead bread

Or, use a pizza stone to bake no knead bread!

You also can use a pizza stone to bake this no knead bread! The best way is with a Dutch oven, but if you don’t have one you can use a pizza stone. You’ll also have to make extra steam in your oven. To do that, you’ll use a baking sheet and pour boiling water onto it right when you add the bread. This creates steam, which makes that crispy crust.

Storing no knead bread

Because this no knead bread has no preservatives, so the storage recommendations are different from a bread you might buy from the store. Here’s what to do:

  • Room temperature storage (2 days): Once you’ve baked your homemade bread, it is best eaten within 48 hours. We store ours wrapped in cloth at room temperature. Use a clean dish towel or a bread bag.
  • Frozen (3 months): Or, you can freeze it! It’s easy to cut your bread in half and freeze half of it! Let it cool to room temperature, then cut it into slices and place it into a sealed bag or container.
Best easy no knead bread

This no knead bread recipe is…

Vegetarian, vegan, plant-based, and dairy free.

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No knead bread

Easy No Knead Bread Recipe


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  • Author: Sonja Overhiser
  • Prep Time: 1 hour 30 minutes (including overnight)
  • Cook Time: 40 minutes
  • Total Time: 2 hours 10 minutes
  • Yield: 12 to 14 slices
  • Diet: Vegan

Description

This homemade no knead bread will wow everyone! It’s so easy to make and has the best flavor, crispy crust, and chewy interior. Great for beginners!


Ingredients

  • 3 cups all purpose flour (375 grams)
  • 1/2 cup whole wheat flour (62 grams)
  • 1/2 teaspoon instant or active dry yeast
  • 9 grams 1 1/2 teaspoons kosher salt
  • 1 1/3 cups water (314 grams)
  • 1 tablespoon apple cider vinegar (15 grams)

Instructions

  1. Mix the dough & rest overnight: In medium bowl, stir together the all purpose flour, whole wheat flour, yeast and salt. Add the warm water and vinegar and stir with a wooden spoon or dough whisk until all flour is incorporated. Place the bowl in a proofing bag or cover with plastic wrap. Rest at room temperature overnight (12 to 18 hours). The resulting dough will be bubbly and very sticky.
  2. Shape the dough: When ready to bake, remove the dough from the bowl onto a clean, lightly-floured countertop. Gently spread the dough into a square and then fold up each side into a packet. Flip the dough over. Place your hands behind the dough and gently pull the dough towards you to increase the tension on the surface of the dough. Rotate and repeat until you have a boule shape. Follow this video tutorial for boule shaping technique.
  3. Proof the dough for 1 hour: Place the boule on a piece of parchment paper about twice the width of the boule. Cover the dough with an inverted large bowl and rest one hour.
  4. Preheat the oven: Preheat the Dutch oven (with lid) at 475°F for 30 minutes. (Or for the pizza stone method, place the pizza stone on middle rack of oven, off to one side. Place a cast iron pan or thickest baking sheet on the rack just below and off to the other side of oven. You’ll pour water into it later to create steam.)
  5. Score the bread: Use a sharp knife or lame to cut several shallow slits at angle across the top of the dough. The photographs show this cross pattern.
  6. Bake for 16 minutes: Working quickly and carefully with oven gloves or mitts, transfer the dough on the parchment paper to the preheated Dutch oven, then place the top on. Bake for 16 minutes. (Or for the pizza stone method, transfer the dough on the parchment paper to the preheated pizza stone. After the bread is on the the stone, make the steam: cover your hand with a towel and very carefully pour 1 cup of water onto the cast-iron pan or baking sheet, then immediately close the door.
  7. Reduce to 400°F and bake for 25 to 27 minutes: After the 16 minutes, reduce the oven temperature to 400°F. Remove the Dutch oven, carefully take out the bread, and set the bread directly onto the oven rack. (Or for the pizza oven method, open the oven door a couple of times to fan out excess moist air.) Bake for an additional 25 to 27 minutes, until hollow when tapped or internal temperature is at 205 to 209 Fahrenheit. Remove the bread from the oven and allow it to cool on a cooling rack for at least 45 minutes. After cooling, the bread is ready to eat. Store the bread wrapped in cloth or in a bread bag on the counter for up to 2 days, or freeze (sliced) wrapped in foil in a plastic bag for several months.

  • Category: Bread
  • Method: Baked
  • Cuisine: Artisan

Keywords: No Knead Bread, No Knead Bread Recipe, Easy Bread, Easy Bread Recipe

Easy no knead bread
No knead bread

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