Marshmallow Peanut Butter Brownies #26

Marshmallow Fluff + Peanut Butter + Brownies = Yes, please. From 100 Cookies Notes This recipe also needs the recipe for My Favorite Brownies (instructions below). I actually prefer these brownies on the second day; the marshmallow fluff softens and th…

Marshmallow Peanut Butter Brownies

Marshmallow Fluff + Peanut Butter + Brownies = Yes, please. From 100 Cookies Notes This recipe also needs the recipe for My Favorite Brownies (instructions below). I actually prefer these brownies on the second day; the marshmallow fluff softens and the chocolate flavor intensifies. PRINT RECIPE 1/2 cup [107 g] creamy peanut butter 1/4 cup [30 g] confectioners’ sugar 2 tablespoons [29 g] unsalted butter, at room temperature 3/4 teaspoon pure vanilla extract Pinch salt 1 recipe My Favorite Brownies 1/2 cup [70 g] store-bought marshmallow fluff Adjust an oven rack to the middle of the oven. Preheat the oven to 350F [180C]. Grease a 9 x 13 in [23 by 33 cm] baking pan and line with a parchment sling. In a medium bowl, mix together the peanut butter, sugar, butter, vanilla, and salt until combined and completely smooth. Make the brownie batter as directed (but do not bake it!). Pour the brownie batter into the prepared pan. Dollop the peanut butter filling and the marshmallow cream over the top, alternating the two. Drag the tip of a butter knife through the batter, creating swirls. Bake until the sides of the brownies have set, the top is starting to […]

The post Marshmallow Peanut Butter Brownies #26 appeared first on The Vanilla Bean Blog.

The Forgotten Inventor of the Fluffernutter Sandwich

I never cared for Fluffernutter sandwiches as a kid—they always struck me as a kind of “nothing” food. Two slices of white bread thickly smeared with peanut butter and a spread made from corn syrup, sugar, egg whites, and vanilla flavoring amounted to …

I never cared for Fluffernutter sandwiches as a kid—they always struck me as a kind of “nothing” food. Two slices of white bread thickly smeared with peanut butter and a spread made from corn syrup, sugar, egg whites, and vanilla flavoring amounted to little more than a sickly-sweet mushy mess. I’d eat them only at friends’ houses, and was always happier to have mac and cheese or tuna salad instead.

In the fall of 2011, I moved from Delaware to Massachusetts for college and found myself, all of a sudden, completely friendless. After a few drab meals in its grey dining hall, the freshmen class—myself included—started craving snacks.

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Rhubarb Marshmallows (Vegan option)

Pink, cloud-like and a little bit tangy – these rhubarb marshmallows are just the ticket for brightening up these gloomy months. My rhubarb obsession continues this year as the forced Yorkshire rhubarb has started to appear in the shops once again. Just in time for my birthday! and for Valentine’s day! Those bright pink, tender stalks are so tart but that makes them the perfect match for the super sweet nature of marshmallow mixture. I used my vegan marshmallow recipe as the base recipe and made a few adjustments to allow me to incorporate rhubarb puree into the mixture. This time I used the carageenan and locust bean gum only, I didn’t try it out with the vege-gel stuff so I’m not 100% sure if that would work here (my assumption is that it would, though). The photos in this post are all of the vegan rhubarb marshmallows and you can see how puffy and fluffy they are! They do lose a bit of volume as they sit so I’d recommend making them in a small batch or consuming within a week-ish. I used the same rhubarb puree in a batch of gelatine-based marshmallows (no egg white) and those worked […]

The post Rhubarb Marshmallows (Vegan option) appeared first on Izy Hossack – Top With Cinnamon.

close up of vegan rhubarb marshmallows on baking paper, dusted with icing sugar

Pink, cloud-like and a little bit tangy – these rhubarb marshmallows are just the ticket for brightening up these gloomy months.

cut rhubarb marshmallows on baking paper, dusted with icing sugar

My rhubarb obsession continues this year as the forced Yorkshire rhubarb has started to appear in the shops once again. Just in time for my birthday! and for Valentine’s day! Those bright pink, tender stalks are so tart but that makes them the perfect match for the super sweet nature of marshmallow mixture.

I used my vegan marshmallow recipe as the base recipe and made a few adjustments to allow me to incorporate rhubarb puree into the mixture. This time I used the carageenan and locust bean gum only, I didn’t try it out with the vege-gel stuff so I’m not 100% sure if that would work here (my assumption is that it would, though). The photos in this post are all of the vegan rhubarb marshmallows and you can see how puffy and fluffy they are! They do lose a bit of volume as they sit so I’d recommend making them in a small batch or consuming within a week-ish.

I used the same rhubarb puree in a batch of gelatine-based marshmallows (no egg white) and those worked a treat as well. They were definitely a bit chewier but have held up better than the vegan ones. I’ve given both recipes below in case you need/want either.

vegan rhubarb marshmallows on an oval plate, overhead, on baking paper with a pair of scissors

I’ve found the marshmallows great for snacking on aaand they toast up well either by kitchen blow torch OR under the oven grill 😉

Other rhubarb goodies:

Rhubarb Puree

Rhubarb Puree

Ingredients

  • 200g (7 ounces) rhubarb
  • 1 tbsp granulated sugar
  • a few drops of red gel food colouring, optional

Instructions

  1. Preheat the oven to 180°C (350°F)
  2. Cut the rhubarb into 5cm (2-inch) lengths. Toss with the sugar in a rimmed roasting dish.
  3. Roast for 15-20 minutes until fork-tender.
  4. Blend, either in the jug of a free standing blender or in a jug/bowl with an immersion (hand) blender. Blend in the food colouring now, if using.
  5. Allow to cool before using.

Notes

If you want the marshmallows to come out as pink as mine, add a few drops of red gel food colouring to the puree. I found without it that the puree wasn't dark enough to show through in the marshmallows. It is just a visual thing though so totally up to you! You can also use liquid red food colouring (rather than gel) - if you use this you'll need more like 1/4 to 1/2 tsp of food colouring.

Rhubarb Marshmallows (vegan)

Rhubarb Marshmallows (vegan)

Yield: 12 large (or 48 small) marshmallows

Ingredients

  • 80g (1/3 cup) aquafaba (chickpea water)
  • 1g (1/4 + 1/8 level tsp) xanthan gum
  • 65g (1/4 cup + 1 tsp) water
  • 200g (1 cup minus 1 tbsp) granulated sugar
  • 65g (3 tbsp) golden syrup, glucose syrup or light corn syrup
  • 1g (1/4 + 1/8 level tsp) carob bean gum (locust bean gum)(see notes)
  • 1g (1/2 level tsp) kappa carageenan (see notes)
  • 75ml (1/3 cup) rhubarb puree (recipe above)

for dusting:

  • icing sugar (powdered sugar)
  • starch for dusting (I prefer potato starch, superfine white rice flour or glutinous rice flour as they work the best. Cornstarch also works but not as well).

Instructions

    Read through all instructions and gather your ingredients + equipment before starting this recipe.

  1. Grease an 8 or 9-inch (20 or 23cm) square cake tin with a bit of vegetable oil. Line with baking paper and then brush the baking paper with a thin layer of vegetable oil too. Set aside.
  2. Place the aquafaba into the heatproof bowl of a stand mixer with the whisk attachment fitted. Sprinkle the xanthan gum over the surface of the aquafaba and then immediately start whisking the mixture on a high speed (if you let it sit around before whisking the xanthan may make clumps). Leave to beat until very thick and pale (similar to egg whites beaten to a stiff peak consistency). Once it reaches this thickness you can turn the mixer off.
  3. Meanwhile combine the water, granulated sugar and golden syrup (or glucose/corn syrup) in a large pot. Set aside.
  4. In a small bowl, place the carob bean gum and locust bean gum. Gradually pour in the rhubarb puree whilst stirring with a whisk to get a slightly goopy mixture. Press through a metal sieve (strainer) to remove any lumps. Set aside.
  5. Place the large pot of sugar mixture on the stove on a medium-high heat. Stir constantly until the sugar has dissolved and then stop stirring but keep heating the mixture until it reaches 127°C (260°F). Take off the heat, pour in the goopy rhubarb mixture and quickly stir together (I like to use a small whisk for this step). Return to the heat and bring back up to 100°C (212°F).
  6. Immediately remove from the heat and, with the mixer running on a medium speed, pour the hot sugar mixture into the aquafaba foam in a steady stream. It should remain fluffy! Once you've poured it all in, increase the speed to maximum for a few seconds to make sure it's all mixed together. Stop the mixer and pour the marshmallow mixture straight into the prepared cake tin as fast as possible! This is very important as the mixture will start to set really quickly so if you don't get it into the pan it wont set flat. Try to spread it out into as even a layer as possible. You can also press a piece of oiled baking paper over the top of the marshmallows in the pan to help smooth it out if you need to.
  7. Leave to set for about 30-60 minutes.
  8. In a small bowl, mix equal volumes of icing sugar and your preferred starch (I like potato starch here the best). You'll probably need around 5 to 8 tablespoons of each.
  9. Dust a work surface with the icing sugar/starch mixture using a small seive/sifter. Gently flip the set marshmallows out onto this and peel away the baking paper. Dust the top of the marshmallows with more icing sugar/starch mixture. Use a sharp knife to cut the marshmallows into squares (you may need to wipe the blade occasionally to keep things neat). Roll each marshmallow in more starch to coat them all over.
  10. Line a baking tray with baking paper and then dust with a bit of the icing sugar/starch mixture. Place the marshmallows on the tray and allow to sit out, uncovered, at room temperature for around 12-24 hours. You'll notice a lot of the starch will have disappeared at this point and they'll be a bit tacky. Re-roll the marshmallows in icing sugar/starch and then return to the tray to let them 'cure' for a further 12-24 hours. Now you should be able to pop them into an airtight container or, as I prefer, leave them out uncovered at room temp as they'll develop more of a sugary crust to them.
  11. They should keep for about 1 week like this, they may lose some fluffiness as they sit so are definitely better when fresh. You may find that if they're in a sealed container that they will need to be re-coated with starch but will become less sticky over time (even though they may appear 'shiny' and so you may think they're sticky, they won't be when you poke them).

Notes

If using volumes instead of weights, make sure you have accurate measuring spoons (I like these ones by OXO which I've tested the accuracy of with my micro scales).

I used THIS carageenan and THIS locust bean gum brand. I haven't tested with other brands which may have varying strengths so I can't say whether it will work first time with different brands. You may have to adjust the levels yourself after testing the recipe with your own ingredients if you have different ones to me.

Rhubarb Marshmallows (non-vegan)

Rhubarb Marshmallows (non-vegan)

Ingredients

  • 60ml (1/4 cup) rhubarb puree (recipe above)
  • 2 1/2 tsp powdered gelatine
  • 125g (1/2 cup + 1 tbsp) granulated sugar
  • 100g (1/4 cup + 1 tbsp) golden syrup, glucose syrup or light corn syrup
  • 55g (1/4 cup) water
  • pinch salt

for dusting:

  • icing sugar (powdered sugar)
  • cornflour (corn starch)

Instructions

  1. Grease an 8 or 9-inch (20 or 23cm) square cake tin with a bit of vegetable oil. Line with baking paper and then brush the baking paper with a thin layer of vegetable oil too. Set aside.
  2. Place the rhubarb puree into the heatproof bowl of a stand mixer with the whisk attachment fitted. Sprinkle the powdered gelatine over the rhubarb puree. Leave to sit for 5 minutes to allow the gelatine to soften.
  3. Combine the sugar, syrup, water and salt in a large pot. Place over a medium heat on the stove and stir occasionally until the sugar has dissolved. Keep heating until the mixture reaches 114°C then remove from the heat.
  4. Turn the mixer onto a medium-low speed and gradually stream the hot syrup into the bowl (aim for the edge of the bowl, not the whisk, to prevent splattering!). Once all the syrup has been added, increase the speed to high and leave to whisk until cooled, very thick, pale and fluffy - about 8-10 minutes.
  5. Use an oiled spatula to scrape the mixture into the prepared pan and to spread it out into an even layer. Leave to cool and set for at least 3 hours at room temperature.
  6. Mix equal volumes of icing sugar and cornflour in a medium bowl. Use a small sieve to dust a work surface with this mixture. Turn the marshmallows out onto this and peel away the baking paper. Dust the top of the marshmallows with more of the mixture. Use a sharp knife (brushed with oil to prevent sticking, as needed) to cut the marshmallows into squares. Dip the cut edges into more of the icing sugar mixture to prevent them sticking together.
  7. Store in an airtight container.

Have you made this recipe?
I’d love to see how it went! Tag me on instagram @izyhossack and hashtag it #topwithcinnamon so I can have a look & reshare in my stories!

The post Rhubarb Marshmallows (Vegan option) appeared first on Izy Hossack - Top With Cinnamon.

Vegan Marshmallows

Making marshmallows can seem like a little bit of magic, watching everything whip up into a fluffy, wobbly foam and letting it set into perfect little clouds. I started what turned out to be a very challenging adventure of making vegan marshmallows a few weeks ago and finally, after about 20 trials, came up with something I was happy with! Experiments with agar First I started with the standard vegan sub for gelatine, agar agar, which is made from seaweed. I found that when using this, my marshmallows just weren’t setting properly and would collapse as soon as pressure was applied to them. Increasing the amount of agar just lead to unpleasantly gummy/dense marshmallows that wouldn’t toast properly. So back to the drawing board I went! I had posted about my marshmallows on instagram and talked to Ellie from Kinda Co about it. She uses carageenan to make melty vegan cheese and recommended I try that instead of the agar (which also wasn’t melting satisfyingly in a toasted marshmallow). Moving on to vege-gel.. I had spied a ‘vegetarian’ gelatine replacement in the supermarket called ‘vege-gel’ from Dr Oetker and had picked some up to see if it would work. My […]

The post Vegan Marshmallows appeared first on Izy Hossack – Top With Cinnamon.

a tray of vegan marshmallows with some toasted

Making marshmallows can seem like a little bit of magic, watching everything whip up into a fluffy, wobbly foam and letting it set into perfect little clouds. I started what turned out to be a very challenging adventure of making vegan marshmallows a few weeks ago and finally, after about 20 trials, came up with something I was happy with!

some cut vegan marshmallows on a worktop

Experiments with agar

First I started with the standard vegan sub for gelatine, agar agar, which is made from seaweed. I found that when using this, my marshmallows just weren’t setting properly and would collapse as soon as pressure was applied to them. Increasing the amount of agar just lead to unpleasantly gummy/dense marshmallows that wouldn’t toast properly. So back to the drawing board I went!

I had posted about my marshmallows on instagram and talked to Ellie from Kinda Co about it. She uses carageenan to make melty vegan cheese and recommended I try that instead of the agar (which also wasn’t melting satisfyingly in a toasted marshmallow).

two mugs of hot chocolate with vegan marshmallows

Moving on to vege-gel..

I had spied a ‘vegetarian’ gelatine replacement in the supermarket called ‘vege-gel’ from Dr Oetker and had picked some up to see if it would work. My initial experiments with it had been using a teaspoon or so along with the agar and when that hadn’t worked, I gave up on using the it. However after my convo with Ellie, I read the packet again and realised that vege-gel contains carageenan and locust bean gum. I also talked to a food scientist on instagram about it and she told me how these two ingredients work synergistically together, meaning they form a stronger gel together than they would apart.

So now that I was back on the carageenan track, I tried using JUST the vege-gel (with xanthan gum to stabilise the aquafaba foam). I used quite a lot of the vege-gel stuff in the end, two packets, which is 13g of the stuff!! But it is cut with dextrose to standardise the batches they make as I read that the strength of carageenan/LBG can vary batch to batch. At least because it’s a standardised ingredient it should work exactly the same for everyone who uses it.

I found these vegan marshmallows have a nicely fluffy texture, they toast properly with a blowtorch and kind of melt; if you leave them in a hot choc for a few minutes they soften up but there’s not a super duper melty effect, I think from the LBG. I found that after toasting they’ll be a bit melty under the surface but not all the way through SO if you want them more melty, I think cutting the marshmallows a bit smaller (and maybe putting them under an oven grill?) should help.

some cut vegan marshmallows on a worktop and on a baking sheet

If you can’t get vege-gel

I knew loads of people who may read this won’t live in the UK/Europe so can’t get vege-gel. So I bought some plain carageenan and LBG, played around with the amounts, and ended up with a vegan marshmallow that was just as good. A word of warning though – if you ARE using pure carageenan/LBG instead of the vege-gel I think there is a variance in strength between brands. Therefore I have linked in the recipe notes to the specific ones I used for testing the recipe so you can get the same ones. However if you can’t get those brands, try it out with ones you can get and see how it goes. If they’re too soft, increase the amounts a tiny bit and try again. If they’re too firm, decrease it!

Make sure your measuring spoons are accurate

One last thing – I used weights for the whole recipe when I was testing as I wanted to be as accurate as possible. I used micro scales to measure my xanthan gum, carageenan and LBG but I have given teaspoon measurements as I know hardly anyone will have these scales. You must have accurate measuring spoons if you’re using volumes though; I recommend these ones from OXO which I tested on the micro scales with water to see if the volume was accurate. I had also tested some crappy metal ones I own and they were WAY off which is why I’m warning you about it now.

Vegan Marshmallows

Vegan Marshmallows

Yield: 12-16 large square marshmallows

Ingredients

For dusting:

  • icing sugar (powdered sugar)
  • starch for dusting (I prefer potato starch, superfine white rice flour or glutinous rice flour as they work the best. Cornstarch also works but not as well).

Instructions

Read through all instructions and gather your ingredients + equipment before starting this recipe.

  1. Grease an 8 or 9-inch (20 or 23cm) square cake tin with a bit of vegetable oil. Line with baking paper and then brush the baking paper with a thin layer of vegetable oil too. Set aside.
  2. Place the aquafaba into the heatproof bowl of a stand mixer with the whisk attachment fitted. Sprinkle the xanthan gum over the surface of the aquafaba and then immediately start whisking the mixture on a high speed (if you let it sit around before whisking the xanthan may make clumps). Leave to beat until very thick and pale (similar to egg whites beaten to a stiff peak consistency). Once it reaches this thickness you can beat in the vanilla extract and then turn the mixer off.
  3. Meanwhile combine the granulated sugar, golden syrup (or glucose/corn syrup) and 75g of water in a large pot. Set aside.
  4. In a small bowl, place the vege-gel. Gradually pour in the remaining 100g of water whilst stirring with a whisk to get a smooth, slightly goopy mixture. Set aside.
  5. Place the large pot of sugar mixture on the stove on a medium-high heat. Stir constantly until the sugar has dissolved and then stop stirring but keep heating the mixture until it reaches 120°C (248°F). Take off the heat, pour in the goopy vege-gel mixture and quickly stir together (I like to use a small whisk for this step). Return to the heat and bring back up to 100°C (212°F).
  6. Immediately remove from the heat and, with the mixer running on a medium speed, pour the hot sugar mixture into the aquafaba foam in a steady stream. It should remain fluffy! Once you've poured it all in, increase the speed to maximum for a few seconds to make sure it's all mixed together. Stop the mixer and pour the marshmallow mixture straight into the prepared cake tin as fast as possible! This is very important as the mixture will start to set really quickly so if you don't get it into the pan it wont set flat. Try to spread it out into as even a layer as possible. You can also press a piece of oiled baking paper over the top of the marshmallows in the pan to help smooth it out if you need to.
  7. Leave to set for about 30-60 minutes.
  8. In a small bowl, mix equal volumes of icing sugar and your preferred starch (I like potato starch here the best). You'll probably need around 5 to 8 tablespoons of each.
  9. Dust a work surface with the icing sugar/starch mixture using a small seive/sifter. Gently flip the set marshmallows out onto this and peel away the baking paper. Dust the top of the marshmallows with more icing sugar/starch mixture. Use a sharp knife to cut the marshmallows into squares (you may need to wipe the blade occasionally to keep things neat). Roll each marshmallow in more starch to coat them all over.
  10. Line a baking tray with baking paper and then dust with a bit of the icing sugar/starch mixture. Place the marshmallows on the tray and allow to sit out, uncovered, at room temperature for around 12-24 hours. You'll notice a lot of the starch will have disappeared at this point and they'll be a bit tacky. Re-roll the marshmallows in icing sugar/starch and then return to the tray to let them 'cure' for a further 12-24 hours. Now you should be able to pop them into an airtight container or, as I prefer, leave them out uncovered at room temp as they'll develop more of a sugary crust to them.
  11. They should keep for about 2 weeks like this. You may find that if they're in a sealed container that they will need to be re-coated with starch but will become less sticky over time (even though they may appear 'shiny' and so you may think they're sticky, they won't be when you poke them).

Notes

1. When testing this recipe I used Dr. Oetker vege-gel which is a pre-blended mixture of carageenan and locust bean gum (carob gum). You can get this in the baking aisle in UK supermarkets (I got mine from Sainsbury's) and it comes in packs containing 3 sachets. I know not everyone will be able to access this so I tested the recipe with straight up carageenan and guar gum. So if you can't get vege-gel, you can use:

1 g (1/2 level tsp) carageenan

1g (1/4 level tsp + 1/8 level tsp) locust bean gum

Just mix them together and use as you would vege-gel in the recipe as usual.

If using volumes instead of weights, make sure you have accurate measuring spoons (I like these ones by OXO which I've tested the accuracy of with my micro scales).

I used THIS carageenan and THIS locust bean gum brand. I haven't tested with other brands which may have varying strengths so I can't say whether it will work first time with different brands. You may have to adjust the levels yourself after testing the recipe with your own ingredients if you have different ones to me.

Have you made this recipe?
I’d love to see how it went! Tag me on instagram @izyhossack and hashtag it #topwithcinnamon so I can have a look & reshare in my stories!

The post Vegan Marshmallows appeared first on Izy Hossack - Top With Cinnamon.

Hot Cocoa Cake with Whipped Marshmallow.

Happy hot cocoa cake day! Or should we (un)officially call this Christmas cake day? You know how much I love a Christmas cake. Which is funny since I hate baking cakes. It’s definitely not a passion of mine. When it comes to a Christmas cake though? I’m so there. Two years ago I made the […]

The post Hot Cocoa Cake with Whipped Marshmallow. appeared first on How Sweet Eats.

Happy hot cocoa cake day!

This hot cocoa cake is made with the fudgiest chocolate cake, smothered in chocolate cream cheese frosting and dolloped with whipped marshmallow!

Or should we (un)officially call this Christmas cake day?

You know how much I love a Christmas cake.

layered frosted chocolate cake

Which is funny since I hate baking cakes. It’s definitely not a passion of mine. When it comes to a Christmas cake though? I’m so there.

Two years ago I made the white sparkle Christmas cake. It has been such a favorite with you guys, something many of you have turned into a tradition now!

Last year, I made a pink peppermint cake. I’m all about that pink peppermint life. It’s fun and festive and whimsical. Looks like a cake straight out of The Grinch! If you are (or know) a peppermint lover, that’s for you.

whipped marshmallow

Let’s take a moment to pray at the altar of whipped marshmallow.

I mean LOOK AT THIS.

This hot cocoa cake is made with the fudgiest chocolate cake, smothered in chocolate cream cheese frosting and dolloped with whipped marshmallow!

So I figured it was high time to do a CHOCOLATE Christmas cake. I almost did the hot cocoa cake last year, but pink peppermint won out. We’re here this year with the most decadent, lovely cake for all the chocolate lovers.

That’s definitely me and I’m raising both hands. 

This hot cocoa cake is made with the fudgiest chocolate cake, smothered in chocolate cream cheese frosting and dolloped with whipped marshmallow!

Isn’t it a beauty?! It’s easy too! 

I mean, sure, it’s high maintenance. But there is no slicing weird layers or anything. Nothing overly complicated, just the preparation of a few recipes (cake, frosting, marshmallow) and assembly.

Trust me, if I can do this, you can totally do it. Promise. Pinky swear.

LYLAS. 

Bonus points if you know that last one.

This hot cocoa cake is made with the fudgiest chocolate cake, smothered in chocolate cream cheese frosting and dolloped with whipped marshmallow!

The cake is a super rich chocolatey cake that is light at the same time. Does that make sense? With a chocolate frosting that is to die for. 

A chocolate cream cheese frosting, because I just can’t resist. I KNOW. This is the millionth time in 2019 that I’ve made a version of cream cheese frosting. But FYI, it’s the most incredible frosting around.

All my life, THIS has been my favorite kind of cake. I wasn’t a huge cake lover growing up and I’ve actually never loved frosting (aside from cream cheese frosting… obvs). For any birthday, or anytime that a cake was warranted, I chose something like this. My mom would always ask what kind of cake I wanted and my response was robotic: “chocolate fudge cake with the dark chocolate fudge icing. You know, the dark chocolate kind.”

This hot cocoa cake is made with the fudgiest chocolate cake, smothered in chocolate cream cheese frosting and dolloped with whipped marshmallow!

Both mother lovett and my mom made a delish chocolate frosting, but it was lighter in appearance and I wanted FUDGE.

So here we are!

At a super fudgy chocolate cake (thanks Ina) with super fudgy chocolate frosting. 

This hot cocoa cake is made with the fudgiest chocolate cake, smothered in chocolate cream cheese frosting and dolloped with whipped marshmallow!

The topping may be my favorite part. I accidentally typed “party,” so I may as well tell you that it may be my favorite party too. 

It’s so light and fluffy. It’s sweet, but it’s light enough in texture that it cuts the richness of the cake. This is the whipped marshmallow that I’ve used on my peanut butter cheesecake. So I know just how well it cuts the richness of desserts. 

The cloud-like texture is also something to write home about and it isn’t very complicated either.

This hot cocoa cake is made with the fudgiest chocolate cake, smothered in chocolate cream cheese frosting and dolloped with whipped marshmallow!

And the entire cake reminds me of my toasted marshmallow cream hot chocolate, which is literally like dessert in a mug. It’s decadent.

This hot cocoa cake is made with the fudgiest chocolate cake, smothered in chocolate cream cheese frosting and dolloped with whipped marshmallow!

It’s the perfect cake to celebrate the season. Or the perfect cake to celebrate your birthday! Or the perfect cake to celebrate a random winter Saturday. Because you can freeze half and you’re good to go.

Or you can share half with a friend, which let’s be real, may be the best way to make friends ever. Try it!

This hot cocoa cake is made with the fudgiest chocolate cake, smothered in chocolate cream cheese frosting and dolloped with whipped marshmallow!

Hot Cocoa Cake

Hot Cocoa Cake with Whipped Marshmallow

This hot cocoa cake is made with the fudgiest chocolate cake, smothered in chocolate cream cheese frosting and dolloped with whipped marshmallow!

cocoa cake

  • 1 3/4 cups all-purpose flour
  • 1 3/4 cups sugar
  • 3/4 cup unsweetened cocoa powder
  • 2 teaspoons baking soda
  • 1 teaspoon baking powder
  • 1 teaspoon salt
  • 1 cup buttermilk
  • 1/2 cup vegetable oil
  • 2 large eggs
  • 3 teaspoons vanilla extract
  • 1 cup freshly brewed hot coffee

chocolate cream cheese frosting

  • 3 8-ounce blocks of cold cream cheese
  • 3/4 cup unsweetened cocoa powder
  • 3 1/2 cups powdered sugar
  • 2 1/2 ounces milk chocolate, (melted and cooled)
  • 1 tablespoons vanilla extract

whipped marshmallow

  • 4 large egg whites
  • 1 cup granulated sugar
  • 1/4 teaspoon cream of tartar
  • 1 teaspoon vanilla extract

cocoa cake

  1. Preheat the oven to 350 degrees F. Spray three 8-inch round baking pans with nonstick baking spray – make sure it’s the kind that has the flour in the spray!
  2. In a bowl, whisk together the flour, sugar, cocoa, baking soda, powder and salt.
  3. In the bowl of your electric mixer fitted with a paddle attachment, beat the buttermilk, oil and eggs on medium speed until combined. Beat in the vanilla extract. With the mixer still on medium speed, beat in the dry ingredients until they are just combined, scraping the bottom and sides of the bowl if needed. Beat in the coffee until combined.
  4. Divide and pour the batter into the prepared cake pans. Bake the cakes for 30 to 35 minutes, or until a tester inserted in the center comes out clean. Let the cake cool for about 30 minutes in the pan, then carefully invert onto parchment paper to let them cool completely.
  5. I actually like to do this part ahead of time. Once cool, I wrap the cake layers in plastic wrap and stick them in the freezer, if only for 30 minutes. This helps the frosting go on nicely!
  6. When you’re ready to frost, add a dollop of frosting on top of two cakes and layer the cakes together. Add the remaining frosting and cover the cake.
  7. Pipe the whipped marshmallow on top of the cake. Sprinkle with cocoa powder. Slice and serve when you’re ready!
  8. We love to keep this cake in the fridge (Eddie loves cold cake!) and I would recommend that since it has the cream cheese frosting. Bring it out 30 to 60 minutes before serving so it can come to room temperature.

chocolate cream cheese frosting

  1. In the bowl of an electric mixer, beat cream cheese until smooth. Add in vanilla. With the mixer on low speed, slowly add powdered sugar 1/2 cup at a time and add cocoa powder, increasing the speed to mix. Add in melted chocolate. If the frosting it a bit too thick, add milk 1 teaspoon at a time until desired consistency is reached. If it is too thin, add additional sugar gradually.

whipped marshmallow

  1. To make the frosting, combine the egg whites, sugar and cream of tartar in a heat-proof bowl, preferably the bowl of your electric stand mixer. Place over top of a double-boiler that contains simmering water, and whisk constantly for 3-4 minutes until the sugar has dissolved and the egg whites are slightly warm. Immediately remove the bowl and place it on your stand mixer with the whisk attachment, beating slow at first and gradually increasing the speed to high.
  2. Beat for 6-7 minutes until glossy and thick, then beat in vanilla extract for another minute until combined.
  3. Fill a piping bag with the marshmallow and pipe puffs on top of the chocolate cake. Sprinkle with cocoa powder!
  4. Note: the marshmallow can be done ahead of time and holds up nicely in the fridge. If you have more than 24 hours though, I would wait as long as you can to add the marshmallow!

cocoa cake layers from ina

This hot cocoa cake is made with the fudgiest chocolate cake, smothered in chocolate cream cheese frosting and dolloped with whipped marshmallow!

What.a.looker.

The post Hot Cocoa Cake with Whipped Marshmallow. appeared first on How Sweet Eats.

Marshmallow Crispy Treats, but Darker, Nuttier & Better

The original Rice Krispies Treats recipe is a classic for a reason—but there’s room for improvement. I’ve always found that the standard ratio of one bag of marshmallows to six cups of cereal produces treats that are too dry and overly firm. Sure, they…

The original Rice Krispies Treats recipe is a classic for a reason—but there’s room for improvement. I've always found that the standard ratio of one bag of marshmallows to six cups of cereal produces treats that are too dry and overly firm. Sure, they taste good, but Rice Krispies Treats have so much more potential and the base recipe is yearning to be improved upon. So in an attempt to elevate them to their full potential, I decided to reformulate the classic. To kick off my development and search for inspiration, I turned as ever to the internet.

The first upgrade I came across was from Smitten Kitchen. Her trick? Browning the butter. This added a wonderful nutty flavor and wasn’t all that difficult to do—a few extra seconds was all it took. While this yielded treats that were rich with toasted dairy flavor, I wanted to see just how far I could push it. I doubled the amount of butter her original recipe called for, swapped sweet cream butter for a salted variety (because salt makes everything better), added a heaping tablespoon of vanilla extract, and finished them with a generous glug of bourbon to highlight the complex brown-butter flavor as much as I possibly could. It was no longer just sweetness—it was sweetness with a depth of smoky caramel flavor. I loved where the recipe was going (it was a clear step in the right direction), but I wanted to push it even further.

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S’mores Donuts

I posted a photo of these S’mores donuts on Instagram today and they got quite a nice reception, so I decided to put the recipe up here on my site. Donuts can be time consuming to make, they are best eaten immediately, and they will cause an enti…

smores donuts

I posted a photo of these S’mores donuts on Instagram today and they got quite a nice reception, so I decided to put the recipe up here on my site. Donuts can be time consuming to make, they are best eaten immediately, and they will cause an entire home to smell like fry oil for a day or two, so I don’t always turn to them (especially on hot summer days), but, I mean, they are delicious, and sometimes one just has to go for it. I have been making cookies for 9 months straight, so I thought they would be a nice change of pace. I didn’t regret my decision. If you are looking for donuts a little less complicated and not so indulgent, I have Raised Mini Donuts and Raised Donuts with Chocolate Glaze on my site as well.  S’mores Donuts I used the recipe for my Raised Mini Donuts, cut them into 2 in [5cm] pieces, and used the large end of a small plain piping tip to cut out the holes (a smaller biscuit cutter or the small end of a funnel will also work). While the donuts were still warm, I rolled them in toasted […]

The post S’mores Donuts appeared first on The Vanilla Bean Blog.