Beef Stew

This is a scrumptious, simple beef stew recipe that’s perfect for warming your after a long winter day.

This is a scrumptious, simple beef stew recipe that’s perfect for warming your after a long winter day.

My favorite cut of beef is perfect for this roast. This is boneless beef shank, which takes a long time to stew, but the resulting roast is perfect. The shank is one of the meatiest and most collagen-rich parts of the animal.

These chunks are great for goulash, thick winter soups, and stew. They are rich in connective tissue that breaks down into a silky texture when cooked slowly, making a wonderful gravy. The meat is tender and flavorful.

What to serve with the beef stew? Mashed potatoes, pasta with olive oil or butter (sprinkle with cheese if you like), and rice. I love eating it with pickles.

How to thicken beef stew? You can flour the meat before frying. Or when the stew is ready, fry a 1 tbsp of flour in 1 tbsp of butter, pour in half a cup of cold water and stir to avoid lumps. Pour the mixture into the stew. Cook 5 min. But boneless beef shank and vegetables makes a rich gravy.

PREP TIME COOK TIME MAKES
15 minutes 120 minutes 5-6 servings

INGREDIENTS (serves 5-6)

  • 2.2 lbs (1 kg) beef shank (boneless)
  • 2 stalks leek
  • 3 carrots
  • 4 celery stalks
  • 2 big tomatoes 
  • 3 cloves of garlic
  • 1 glass (150 ml) dry red wine

  • 2 tsp paprika
  • ⅓ ground allspice
  • 1 tso ground coriander
  • 1 tsp ground black pepper
  • ½ -1 tsp chili pepper flakes
  • ⅓ tsp grated nutmeg
  • 2 bay leaves
  • 3-4 thyme sprigs
  • 4-5 tbsp oil for frying

INSTRUCTIONS

You can find the video recipe of Beef stew in my InstagramLet’s be friends!

  1. Cut the meat into small pieces. Pour the frying oil into a heavy-bottomed pot or deep frying pan. Put the meat.
  2. Add all the spices except herbs (coriander, ground black pepper, allspice, ground pepper, paprika, grated nutmeg, and chili) to the meat and fry everything together.
  3. Cut the leek lengthwise and chop coarsely. Cut the carrots into thick slices or circles. Coarsely chop the celery and add it, along with the carrots, leek, and finely chopped garlic, to the meat.
  4. Continue frying, then pour in the wine, add the diced tomatoes, thyme, and bay leaves.
  5. Simmer over a very low heat until the meat is tender (this will take about 2 hours).

If, despite the warnings, you were not cooking on a very low heat and you did not get enough gravy, add just a little water.

  1. Salt and add sprigs of parsley 10 minutes before readiness. Serve with mashed potatoes, rice, or pasta.

UKRAINIAN HOME COOKING
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UZBEK PILAF WITH LAMB

A real very detailed recipe for Uzbek pilaf.

Pilaf is an oriental dish. It is cooked in Central Asia, the Caucasus, and the Crimean Tatars here in Ukraine.

But the most famous one is the Uzbek pilaf which has many varieties: with or without meat, with dried fruits, peas, quince, wheat, or chickpeas. Ferghana-style Uzbek pilaf is considered by many as a golden standard.

My grandfather is from the Caucasus. That’s why I have a strong craving for all oriental dishes. So, let’s move on to my favourite pilaf recipe.

What’s important for pilaf:

Meat. Don’t take the meat of a very young lamb. The back of the shank with a little fat would be perfect. This part releases a lot of collagen, and the pulp has a rich meat flavour. If there is cartilage or bones in the meat, don’t remove them, just leave them. If your piece of lamb is low in fat, ask the seller for some more. There usually would be some trimmings after butchering the carcass.

Tableware. Pilaf is cooked in a metal, non-enamelled dish – ideally in a cast-iron cauldron with a thick bottom. If it’s not available, choose a deep frying pan or the thick-bottomed pot.

Rice. Devzira is considered the best rice for pilaf. It is a long-grain, shallow-polished rice that absorbs liquid very well. Next comes Chungara and affordable Basmati that I use; Basmati Parboiled rice would be a perfect choice. You can select any kind of rice you like or have on hand. If the rice is unparboiled, it’s important to rinse it well. And if the rice is very starchy, it must be washed and then soaked in warm water for 30 minutes to make it less sticky.

Spices for pilaf. Take a ready-made mix. It should include barberries, cumin, turmeric, hot pepper, sometimes saffron, paprika, fenugreek, sumac, anise, and coriander.

The main steps of cooking pilaf are as follows:

Step 1. Rendering and heating the fat. Pilaf is cooked using a mixture of seed oil and animal fat. Ideally, it should be a fat tail – an adipose deposit in the tail area of a fat-tailed sheep breed. But trimmings of regular lamb fat are fine too.

Step 2. Cooking zirvak. It is a mixture of meat, carrots, and onions.

Step 3. Putting in the rice and cook until almost done.

Step 4. Cooking pilaf under the lid until done.


Uzbek Pilaf with Lamb

Recipe

PREP TIME COOK TIME MAKES
15-20 minutes 1,5-2,5 hours 4 servings

INGREDIENTS (serves 3-4)

  • 19 oz (550 g) lamb meat
  • 2 oz (50 g) lamb fat, the fat tail is ideal
  • 2 onions (12 oz, 350g)
  • 10 oz (300 g) carrots
  • 12 oz (350 g) rice
  • 2.5 tsp spices for pilaf
  • 2 heads of garlic
  • 1 hot pepper
  • 2 tbsp oil for frying
  • Salt

INSTRUCTIONS

If you are using unparboiled rice, rinse it and soak it in warm water for 30 minutes. Drain water from rice.

Step 1. Rendering and heating the fat.

  1. Cut the lamb fat and meat. The larger the pieces, the longer the lamb will stew.
  2. Put only fat in a cauldron or thick-bottomed pot, and melt the fat over low heat for 5-7 minutes.
  1. Take out the greaves with a slotted spoon.
  2. Pour in 2 tbsp of oil for frying and heat for 3 more minutes.

Step 2. Cooking zirvak

  1. Add meat to the pot. Fry for 10-15 minutes.
  2. Cut carrots into strips. Cut the onion coarsely. Add vegetables to meat and stir-fry for 20 minutes.
  1. Add half of the spices and cook for another 5 minutes.
  1. Pour in 1 ¾ cup (400 ml) of water and add 3 large pinches of salt. Cook under a lid until the meat is tender. (It took me 1 hour 20 minutes).

Step 3. Putting in the rice and cooking until done.

  1. Put the rice into a pot and flatten with a spoon.
  1. Pour in 1 ¾ cup (400 ml) of boiling water very carefully. The water level should be 1-1.5 cm above the rice. Put some salt on top of the rice (about 3-4 pinches of salt and add the rest of the spices). But don’t mix anything!
  2. Remove the top skin from the garlic and cut off the roots. Dip garlic heads and whole hot peppers in the rice. Cook in an open pot over low heat for about 25-30 minutes.
  1. Taste the rice. It shouldn’t be crunchy but almost done. Make a hole with a spoon or stick and see if there is water at the bottom.
  2. If the rice is still crispy and there is no water at the bottom, pour in 3-5 tbsp of water around the edges and cook for another 5 minutes. If there is too much water, poke a few holes in the rice so that water evaporates faster.

Step 4. Cooking pilaf under the lid until done.

  1. Cover the rice tightly with a lid or foil and place the pot on the lowest heat. Wait for 10-15 minutes.
  1. Remove the pepper so that it doesn’t break and all the spiciness doesn’t come out. Gently mix rice with zirvak. Let it stand uncovered for about 5-10 minutes before serving.


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BRAISED CROSS-CUT BEEF SHANK WITH CARROTS AND ONIONS – OSSO BUCO

This is a cozy autumn and winter dish.

Ossobuco or osso buco – this is a cozy autumn and winter dish. Beef knuckle is the cheapest, most flavorful, and underrated part of the cow. The meat is tough, but stewing makes it tender by releasing a lot of collagen from the tendons. Don’t forget to eat the marrow from the center of the bone. Lightly salt it and put it on a piece of bread.

What to serve with osso bucco? Risotto, mashed potatoes, couscous, or polenta are ideal as a side dish. Serve with pickles, like pickled hot peppers, tomatoes, or cucumbers.

What kind of meat is in osso buco? Traditionally, osso buco is made with beef. But you can use veal, pork, lamb, or turkey.

What to drink with osso bucco? What You can wash it down with tomato juice, a Bloody Mary, hearty red wine, or unfiltered beer.

How to cook osso buco? Traditionally, the knuckle slices are rolled in flour and then fried. I don’t like adding extra unhealthy calories to a dish unless it makes sense. So we just fry the slices in oil and then stew until soft, along with the vegetables and spices.

You can prepare this dish in a cauldron over a fire outdoors for a large number of people. And serve with wheat porridge.


Braised Cross-cut Beef Shank with Carrots and Onions – Osso Buco

Recipe

Braised Cross-cut Beef Shank with Carrots and Onions – Osso Buco
Braised Cross-cut Beef Shank with Carrots and Onions – Osso Buco
PREP TIME COOK TIME MAKES
10 minutes 1-2 hours 2 servings

INGREDIENTS (serves 2)

  • 1 kg cross-cut beef or veal shank – osso buco (2-3 slices)
  • 2 carrots (250 g)
  • 4 onions (350 g)
  • 1 head of garlic

  • 3 bay leaves
  • 1 sprig of rosemary
  • 8 allspice peppercorns
  • 1 tsp coriander seeds
  • 1 tsp ground black pepper
  • 1 tsp salt
  • 1 hot chili pepper or jalapeno
  • 3 tbsp vegetable oil

INSTRUCTIONS

  1. Heat the vegetable oil in a deep, thick-sided saucepan. Fry the beef slices on both sides until brown. Remove the meat and set it aside.
  2. Coarsely chop the onion into feathers and the carrots into thick rounds.
  3. Peel the garlic cloves and crush them with the flat side of a knife.
  4. Put the onions and carrots in the saucepan and sauté for about 7-10 minutes. Add the garlic and sauté for another 2-3 minutes. Add 300 milliliters of water and return the meat to the pot. Add rosemary, allspice, coriander, and bay leaf. Reduce the heat to low.
  5. Stew for half an hour, turn the meat over, and add salt. Gently turn the pieces of meat every half hour and cook until the meat is soft. The meat should easily detach from the bone. At the end, add black pepper and the chopped hot peppers.

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ROAST BEEF SALAD

Make this simple salad when you have some left over roast or steak from the day before dinner.

I make this salad when I have some roast beef left over from Vitello Tonnato or left over steak from the day before. Simple and delicious.


Salad with Roast Beef

Recipe

PREP TIME COOK TIME MAKES
2-3 minutes 20 minutes 2 servings

INGREDIENTS (serves 2)

  • 230 g (8 oz) cooked roast beef
  • 250 g (9 oz) small red potatoes
  • 220 g (8 oz) radishes
  • 220 g (8 oz) cucumber
  • 2-3 C mixed salad leaves (I use arugula and spinach)
  • 20 g (0,5 oz) canned chili peppers (optional)

For the sauce:

  • 1 tbsp Dijon mustard
  • 1 tbsp honey
  • 3 tbsp olive oil
  • 1 tbsp capers

INSTRUCTIONS

  1. Mix all the dressing ingredients. Add chopped chili peppers.
  2. Wash the potatoes and boil them in their skin until tender. Cut into 2-4 pieces. Gently toss the hot potatoes in the dressing.
  3. Trim the radishes on both ends and cut into 4 pieces. Cut the cucumber lengthwise into 4 pieces and chop coarsely.
  4. Mix the vegetables, spinach, and arugula. Toss and place on plates. Lay thin slices of roast beef on top and serve immediately.

UKRAINIAN HOME COOKING
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What to Cook This Week?

PORK AND CABBADGE

Comfort food that can be prepared in advance. After all, it only gets better the next day. Very popular dish in Ukraine.

Comfort food that can be prepared in advance. After all, it only gets better the next day. Very popular dish in Ukraine.


Braised Cabbage with Pork Ribs

Recipe

Braised Cabbage with Pork Ribs
Braised Cabbage and Pork Ribs
PREP TIME COOK TIME MAKES
10-15 minutes 70-80 minutes 4 servings

INGREDIENTS (serves 4)

  • 1 kg (2,2 lbs) pork ribs
  • 1.6 kg (3,5 lbs) cabbage
  • 2 big onions
  • 1 tbsp tomato paste
  • 3 bay leaves
  • 1 tbsp ground allspice
  • 1 tsp ground black pepper
  • Juice of ½ lemon (2.5 tbsp lemon juice)
  • Vegetable oil (~7 tbsp, 100 ml)
  • 1 tbsp sugar
  • 1 tsp cumin
  • Salt

INSTRUCTIONS

  1. Heat vegetable oil in a thick-bottomed pot or use a deep skillet. Cover and roast the ribs until dark.
  2. Cut the onion into half rings. Add to the ribs and braise over low heat for about 30 minutes until soft.
  3. Shred the cabbage. Salt and lightly knead with your hands. Add to the meat and onions. Sprinkle in the cumin. Stir the cabbage to evenly distribute the fat. Braise for 30-40 minutes. Stir occasionally. The cabbage should be cooked, but remain slightly crispy.
  4. Add sugar, lemon juice, and tomato paste. Mix well and braise for another 10 minutes.

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What to Cook This Week?

The Definitive Guide to Making Pulled Pork

Each week this summer, Cara Nicoletti of The Meat Hook is helping us get to know our favorite cuts a little bit better – and introducing you to a few new ones, too. Read on, study up, then hightail it to your nearest butcher.
Today: We’re showing…

Each week this summer, Cara Nicoletti of The Meat Hook is helping us get to know our favorite cuts a little bit better – and introducing you to a few new ones, too. Read on, study up, then hightail it to your nearest butcher.

Today: We're showing you how to make classic homemade pulled pork, no Southern smokepit required.   

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Hungarian Stuffed Kohlrabi (Töltött Karalábé)

The perfect way to use tender spring kohlrabi, this traditional Hungarian dish features bulbs of kohlrabi stuffed with a flavorful pork and rice filling, and served alongside a kohlrabi soup made with the leftover scraps and greens. Kohlrabi may look like an alien creature, but if you’ve never had it before, you’re in for a […]

The post Hungarian Stuffed Kohlrabi (Töltött Karalábé) first appeared on Love and Olive Oil.

The perfect way to use tender spring kohlrabi, this traditional Hungarian dish features bulbs of kohlrabi stuffed with a flavorful pork and rice filling, and served alongside a kohlrabi soup made with the leftover scraps and greens.

Kohlrabi may look like an alien creature, but if you’ve never had it before, you’re in for a treat! It has a taste and texture similar to broccoli stems, but sweeter and not quite as odorous.

Dark gray bowls with Hungarian Stuffed Kohlrabi (one bigger and one smaller bulb) surrounded by a green kohlrabi green puree

This is our second year as Caney Fork Farms CSA members, which, unlike other CSAs we’ve been a part of over the years, offers a year round produce box. The fact that we can still get fresh produce in the dead of winter still astonishes this raised-in-Colorado girl.

Last winter, one of the most exciting items in our box was an alien-looking brassica called Kohlrabi. It was something I had never eaten, let alone cooked, and I really had no clue what to do with it. So, hoping for both inspiration and education, I asked my followers on Instagram for recipe ideas. And boy did you deliver!

Many suggested soup, also popular were slaws or salads (the crunchy bulb being not unlike the thick stalks of broccoli in terms of texture and flavor, so this makes sense.)

But one recipe stood out. Piszke, a generous follower from Hungary, sent over a recipe for a traditional Hungarian stuffed kohlrabi with a ground pork and rice filling, then served over a kohlrabi green and sour cream puree.

Single bulb of fresh kohlrabi, on a white marble background and harsh light and shadows

Stuffed kohlrabi is a very traditional Hungarian dish, but there’s no one single way to make it. Much like Italians and their marinara, every family will have their own different version of it, with different meats (some feature beef instead of pork, or a mix of the two) as well as many different stuffings, seasonings, and accompaniments.

But this one is particularly unique in that it uses the entire vegetable, greens and all. It makes its own side dish, essentially, by pureeing the greens and leftover pulp from the hollowed-out bulbs into a gorgeously green, flavorful soup. Brilliant, right? That’d be like a cake recipe that made its own frosting or something.

(more…)

How to Make Chicharrones at Home

Cara Nicoletti of The Meat Hook helps us get to know our favorite cuts of meat a little bit better—and introduces us to a few new ones, too. Read on, study up, then hightail it to your nearest butcher.
If former articles in this column are a…

Cara Nicoletti of The Meat Hook helps us get to know our favorite cuts of meat a little bit betterand introduces us to a few new ones, too. Read on, study up, then hightail it to your nearest butcher.

If former articles in this column are any indication, it's pretty clear that I think crispy skin is the tops. Frankly, we’re all for crispy everything but today we’re here to talk about homemade chicharrones. Chicharrones are a traditional Spanish dish consisting of fried pork belly or pork rinds. It’s as delicious as it sounds. We've talked about getting our pork skin crisp while cooking pork belly, and then again later with pork shoulder and chops. We've talked about crispy skin while spatchcocking and beer-canning our chickens, and à l’orange-ing ducks, and maybe we snuck some of the gribenes out of our apple and onion schmaltz to snack on, too. (I’m not here to judge.)

Read More >>

GREEK LAMB RIBS

How to bake lamb ribs in the oven

Of course, the best way to cook lamb ribs is over an open fire to get a smoky flavor. But this method also works wonderfully. This is a recipe for well-cooked lamb without blood. Since our recipe is Greek, it is worth noting that in taverns, most often you are served well-done lamb.

If you are adding potatoes to the same pan as the lamb, be warned that they will not turn out as crispy as if you were baking them separately. But it’s really worth it, because they soak up all the juices and flavors of the lamb. So sacrifice the crust for extra flavor.

Ok, How to cook Lamb Ribs Greek style?


Baked Lamb Ribs in Greek Style

How to bake lamb ribs in the oven

Recipe

PREP TIME COOK TIME MAKES
120 minutes 45 minutes 2 servings

INGREDIENTS (serves 2)

  • 4 big lamb ribs
  • 4 potatoes
  • 1 tbsp oil

For the marinade:

  • ½ onion 80 g
  • 7-8 cherry tomatoes
  • 2 sprigs of rosemary
  • 2 pinches of black pepper
  • 1 tbsp olive oil
  • 1.5 tsp whole grain mustard
  • ⅓ tsp salt

INSTRUCTIONS

  1. Slice the onion into feathers. Cut the cherry tomatoes into halves.
  2. In a In a food container, mix all the ingredients for the marinade. Spread over the ribs, mix well with your hands, cover with a lid or cling wrap and leave at room temperature for at least 2 hours.
  1. Preheat the oven to 220°C / 425°F. If possible, use convection mode, with the top and bottom heating.
  2. Wash the potatoes and cut them into small pieces. Put them in a baking dish. Add a pinch of salt and vegetable oil. Stir to distribute the oil and place in the oven for 20 minutes.
  3. Increase the temperature to 240°C / 475°F . Add the lamb ribs with onions and tomatoes. Distribute the vegetables and meat evenly. Bake for 10 minutes on one side, flip, and cook for another 15 minutes.

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It’s good to eat together.…

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How to Make Charcuterie Actually Look Cute on a Cheese Board

That Cheese Plate is a column by Marissa Mullen—cookbook author, photographer, and Food52’s Resident Cheese Plater. With Marissa’s expertise in all things cheddar, Comté, and crudité—plus tips for how to make it all look extra special, using stuff you …

That Cheese Plate is a column by Marissa Mullen—cookbook author, photographer, and Food52's Resident Cheese Plater. With Marissa's expertise in all things cheddar, Comté, and crudité—plus tips for how to make it all look extra special, using stuff you probably have on hand—we'll be crafting our own cheesy masterpieces without a hitch. This month, Marissa is letting us in on some tricks of the trade when it comes to styling charcuterie.


Charcuterie is an essential element of any cheese board, adding robust flavors ranging from cured salt and red wine to fennel and cracked black pepper. The word “charcuterie” is derived from the French words “chair” (flesh) and “cuit” (cooked). The term was first spotted on the scene in the 15th century in signage on storefronts specializing in the preparation of cooked pig.

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