GREEK LAMB RIBS

How to bake lamb ribs in the oven

Of course, the best way to cook lamb ribs is over an open fire to get a smoky flavor. But this method also works wonderfully. This is a recipe for well-cooked lamb without blood. Since our recipe is Greek, it is worth noting that in taverns, most often you are served well-done lamb.

If you are adding potatoes to the same pan as the lamb, be warned that they will not turn out as crispy as if you were baking them separately. But it’s really worth it, because they soak up all the juices and flavors of the lamb. So sacrifice the crust for extra flavor.

Ok, How to cook Lamb Ribs Greek style?


Baked Lamb Ribs in Greek Style

How to bake lamb ribs in the oven

Recipe

PREP TIME COOK TIME MAKES
120 minutes 45 minutes 2 servings

INGREDIENTS (serves 2)

  • 4 big lamb ribs
  • 4 potatoes
  • 1 tbsp oil

For the marinade:

  • ½ onion 80 g
  • 7-8 cherry tomatoes
  • 2 sprigs of rosemary
  • 2 pinches of black pepper
  • 1 tbsp olive oil
  • 1.5 tsp whole grain mustard
  • ⅓ tsp salt

INSTRUCTIONS

  1. Slice the onion into feathers. Cut the cherry tomatoes into halves.
  2. In a In a food container, mix all the ingredients for the marinade. Spread over the ribs, mix well with your hands, cover with a lid or cling wrap and leave at room temperature for at least 2 hours.
  1. Preheat the oven to 220°C / 425°F. If possible, use convection mode, with the top and bottom heating.
  2. Wash the potatoes and cut them into small pieces. Put them in a baking dish. Add a pinch of salt and vegetable oil. Stir to distribute the oil and place in the oven for 20 minutes.
  3. Increase the temperature to 240°C / 475°F . Add the lamb ribs with onions and tomatoes. Distribute the vegetables and meat evenly. Bake for 10 minutes on one side, flip, and cook for another 15 minutes.

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How to Make Charcuterie Actually Look Cute on a Cheese Board

That Cheese Plate is a column by Marissa Mullen—cookbook author, photographer, and Food52’s Resident Cheese Plater. With Marissa’s expertise in all things cheddar, Comté, and crudité—plus tips for how to make it all look extra special, using stuff you …

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HALLOWEEN FACE MEAT PIE

You get magical aromatic soft and sweet figs. And what great juice it releases during baking. This recipe really saves the day when your figs are, to put it mildly, so-so.

Happy Halloween!

Everyone will love this Jack-o-Lantern meat pie for Halloween. Scary and delicious at the same time. You can make portioned mini-pies with different faces or one big one. It’s really good food, not just decorative.

Face Meat Pie

Halloween Jack-o-Lantern Meat Pie

Recipe

PREP TIME COOK TIME MAKES
40 minutes 40 minutes 4 servings

INGREDIENTS (serves 2)

  • 500 g (1,1 lb) ground meat (beef, pork, chicken, or a mix)
  • 1 (120 g, 4 oz) onion
  • 1 (120 g, 4 oz) carrot
  • 200 g (7 oz) canned diced or chopped tomatoes
  • 250 g (9 oz) puff pastry
  • 1 egg + 1 egg yolk
  • 1 tsp butter
  • 1 tsp curry spice mix
  • 1 tsp ground paprika
  • ¼ tsp dried garlic
  • Salt
  • Vegetable oil for frying
  • Ketchup for decoration

INSTRUCTIONS

  1. Dice the onion. Grate carrots on a medium grater.
  2. Heat 3 tbsp of vegetable oil in a deep frying pan, add onions, fry for 2-3 minutes. Then put in the carrots and cook for about 5 more minutes.
  3. Add the ground meat to the frying pan. Sauté for 10 minutes, breaking up the lumps. Add the curry, paprika, garlic, and 2 large pinches of salt. Stir. Pour in the tomatoes and a glass of water. Braise on low heat for about 20 minutes. The water should come to a full boil. Remove from the heat and cool completely. Then add 1 egg and mix.
  4. Roll out the dough about 3-4 mm thick. Grease a baking dish with butter. Line the baking dish with part of the dough, press the edges around the perimeter of the dish with a rolling pin and trim off the excess. See the video for details.
  5. Roll out the rest of the dough and cut out a circle the diameter of the baking dish. With round salad molds or shot glasses, cut out the eyes and nose (see the video). Cut the mouth and teeth. Transfer the dough on top of the filling and join the edges well. Cut off the excess with scissors, if necessary.
  6. Work again on the shape of the eyes and teeth. Preheat the oven to 180°C (350°F)
  7. Mix the egg yolk with 1 tbsp water and brush on top of the pie. Bake for 40 minutes until golden. Cool the pie. Use a little ketchup to simulate blood. Happy Halloween!

Video recipe


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The post Taco Shells & Cheese first appeared on Love and Olive Oil.

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