Meyer Lemon Poppyseed Loaf

Meyer Lemon Poppyseed Loaf
Meyer lemons are always a favorite of mine when it comes to baked goods. The citrus – which is in season all year round – is less acidic than other lemons, meaning that it has a wonderful lemon flavor yet seems to be a touch sweeter than most lemons. This Meyer Lemon Poppyseed …

The post Meyer Lemon Poppyseed Loaf appeared first on Baking Bites.

Meyer Lemon Poppyseed Loaf
Meyer lemons are always a favorite of mine when it comes to baked goods. The citrus – which is in season all year round – is less acidic than other lemons, meaning that it has a wonderful lemon flavor yet seems to be a touch sweeter than most lemons. This Meyer Lemon Poppyseed Loaf is a delicious way to put meyer lemons to good use. It is a moist and easy to make quick bread that is bursting with lemon flavor in every bite, accented by the subtle crunch of poppyseeds.

The bread is easy to put together and features both lemon zest and lemon juice. Most of the lemon flavor comes from the citrus zest, which is the colorful exterior of a citrus fruit. The zest is loaded with lemon oil, a potent flavoring agent. You’ll want to use a microplane to quickly and efficiently remove the zest from the fruit. Once you have zested the lemon, combine it with sugar – which will rub even more oil out of it as you mix the two together – and the rest of the ingredients in the batter. There is a small amount of lemon juice in the batter, as well as some in the glaze.

The lemon glaze that is used in this recipe is very easy to make and a little bit different than most of the other glazes that I make. It is made with lemon juice and granulated sugar, and it is spooned directly onto the hot loaf when it comes out of the oven. The lemon juice will kind of soak into the loaf, while the lemon-flavored sugar sits on top. As the loaf cools, the juice will be absorbed – making the loaf moist – while the sugar forms a subtle crust on top. It has a really bright flavor and a hint of crunch, which makes it particularly delicious!

You can use regular lemons for this recipe for a more traditional lemon poppyseed loaf. It will be just as delicious, with a slightly different (and still very lemony!) flavor profile from the meyer lemon version. The loaf is ready to eat as soon as it has cooled and you should allow it to cool completely before slicing it to allow the lemon glaze to set.

Meyer Lemon Poppyseed Loaf
2 1/3 cups all purpose flour
1 tsp baking powder
1/2 tsp baking soda
1/2 tsp salt
1 cup sugar
1 1/2 tbsp meyer lemon zest
1 large egg
1/2 tsp vanilla extract
1/3 cup vegetable oil
3/4 cup buttermilk
1/4 cup meyer lemon juice
1 tbsp poppyseeds

Drizzle
2 tbsp meyer lemon juice
1/4 cup granulated sugar

Preheat oven to 350F. Lightly grease a 9×5-inch loaf pan and the base of the loaf pan with parchment paper to minimize sticking.
In a medium bowl, whisk together flour, baking powder, baking soda and salt.
In a large bowl, whisk together sugar, lemon zest, egg and vanilla extract. Stir in vegetable oil and whisk until completely incorporated. Stir in half of the flour mixture, followed by the buttermilk and lemon juice. Stir in the remaining flour mixture and the poppyseeds and mix until batter is uniform. Pour into prepared pan.
Bake for 55-60 minutes, or until a toothpick inserted into the center of the loaf pan comes out with only a few moist crumbs attached and the top springs back when lightly pressed.

While the loaf is baking, prepare the drizzle by combining lemon juice and granulated sugar in a small bowl. When the loaf comes out of the oven. us a spoon to drizzle the sugar mixture evenly over the top of the loaf. Do not pierce loaf, simply allow the mixture to soak in as the loaf cools.
When cooled, remove loaf from pan and slice to serve.

Makes 1 loaf; serves 8-12.

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Old-Fashioned Meyer Lemon Marmalade

Old-fashioned Meyer lemon marmalade is made with little more than lemons, sugar, water and time. The result is a vibrant citrine-hued marmalade with a perfect balance of sweet and tart. Meyer lemons, a cross between traditional lemons and mandarin oranges, have a sweeter flavor that makes them perfect for marmalade (it’s definitely one of my […]

Old-fashioned Meyer lemon marmalade is made with little more than lemons, sugar, water and time. The result is a vibrant citrine-hued marmalade with a perfect balance of sweet and tart.

Meyer lemons, a cross between traditional lemons and mandarin oranges, have a sweeter flavor that makes them perfect for marmalade (it’s definitely one of my favorites).

Open jar of Old-Fashioned Meyer Lemon Marmalade, with whole and half lemons and full jars with printable labels.

When life (or in this case, your lovely Auntie) gives you lemons…

… make marmalade.

Ok, and maybe some lemonade too. And preserved lemons. And lemon bars. And lemon curd. And lemon poppyseed muffins. And… (she really did send me a TON of lemons).

Luckily I’ve got a wealth of Meyer lemon recipes to choose from.

Still, I couldn’t resist putting this perfect, untreated fruit to work in a batch of good old-fashioned marmalade.

Bright yellow Meyer lemons in a ceramic bowl on marble background

This is an old fashioned marmalade recipe, meaning it does not have any added pectin.

What it does have is quite a bit of sugar.

I know 7 cups seems like a lot, but please don’t try to reduce the sugar in this recipe. I won’t get into the science of it, but having the proper concentration of sugar is what allows the pectin to activate and the marmalade to form a proper gel.

I know it might seem like reducing the sugar will result in a less-sweet jam, but the point at which a marmalade ‘sets’ is when the sugar concentration reaches a certain percentage (typically 60-65%). If you reduce the sugar, you’ll either end up with a runny jam, or you’ll have to cook the jam for a longer period of time, essentially evaporating off more water until you end up with the same concentration of sugar as if you used the full quantity of sugar to begin with. So unless you want to spend more time to get a smaller quantity of the same thing, please use the full quantity of sugar as written.

I’d also argue that the sweetness is necessary to offset the tart and bitter notes of the citrus, much in the way sugar is pretty much a requirement for lemonade (drinking straight up lemon juice is anything but pleasant). In the case of marmalade sugar also works as a preservative, maintaining the stained glass-like color of the citrus for a much longer period of time.

That said, I do have some lower sugar marmalade recipes here as well as a few in my ebook which use Pomona’s pectin (this particular kind of pectin is designed to react with calcium, not sugar, so you can reduce the added sugar in jams by a significant amount without affecting the final set). I do find that these lower-sugar preserves, marmalade especially, do tend to darken in color over time, much more noticeably than the old fashioned kind.

Want to see the whole step by step process? I documented the entire marmalade-making procedure last weekend in my Instagram Stories, and saved to my highlights. Because sometimes it’s easier to see a recipe made to fully understand just how it works.

Also be sure to click through/scroll down to get the FREE printable labels I’ve designed just for you. :)

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Lemon Butter Spaghetti Squash with Feta.

Definitely trying to brighten winter with this lemon spaghetti squash! Okay after this, I SWEAR that I’m done with the lemon. For now. I know that things have been very lemon-heavy over here lately but it’s.just.so.good. I mean, it’s always good but right now during the peak of citrus season, it’s incredible. It’s like the […]

The post Lemon Butter Spaghetti Squash with Feta. appeared first on How Sweet Eats.

Definitely trying to brighten winter with this lemon spaghetti squash!

This lemon spaghetti squash is tossed in a lemon garlic butter and topped with feta, sliced toasted almonds and fresh herbs. It's delicious!

Okay after this, I SWEAR that I’m done with the lemon. For now. I know that things have been very lemon-heavy over here lately but it’s.just.so.good. I mean, it’s always good but right now during the peak of citrus season, it’s incredible.

It’s like the past month has tasted like one ginormous lemon bar!

spaghetti squash

I’m wrapping up work for my latest cookbook (out next year!) and one of the recipes that I’ve made approximately 10 million times over the last two years is a what I call a lemon butter chicken. The recipe will be in the book and it’s incredible – so basic but so good that we go through phases of making it once a week. I live for it. 

That’s a very rambly  (and unfair!) way of saying that I took some inspiration from that recipe and threw this together. Spaghetti squash, for the win! We actually shot this recipe waaaay back in November, when meyer lemons first came on the scene here. I’ve been dying to share it and today, I’ll be making it over on instagram if you want to see it in action. 

spaghetti squash

Never did I ever think I’d want to attack a plate of squash. Until now.

Look at that!

I reeealllly suggest making the recipe with the butter listed because it cuts the tartness of the lemon, while providing a richness to the squash. It’s the fat we need with the acid we need and the flavor is DELISH. 

On top? Of course you know that I need toppings. I crave the CRUNCH! I went with feta here for the creaminess and then sliced almonds for the crunch. A sprinkling of fresh herbs add a refreshing brightness that we need in this season too. 

This lemon spaghetti squash is tossed in a lemon garlic butter and topped with feta, sliced toasted almonds and fresh herbs. It's delicious!

Also! You can totally make and eat this inside the spaghetti squash skin, much like my spaghetti squash parmesan! It’s easier that way if you’re making it for yourself. If you’re making it for your family or even for two people, scrap it out and toss it in the sauce.

I was also inspired to make this recipe because my uncle brought a simple yet delicious spaghetti squash dish to Thanksgiving dinner and I couldn’t stop thinking about it. Even though the squash is a pain to cut, most of the prep time here is completely hands off! It’s a great side or light meal if you need some fresh ideas. 

That’s exxxxactly the kind of recipe that I love.

This lemon spaghetti squash is tossed in a lemon garlic butter and topped with feta, sliced toasted almonds and fresh herbs. It's delicious!

Lemon Butter Spaghetti Squash

Lemon Butter Spaghetti Squash

This lemon spaghetti squash is tossed in a lemon garlic butter and topped with feta, sliced toasted almonds and fresh herbs. It’s delicious!

  • 1 spaghetti squash
  • 2 tablespoons unsalted butter
  • 1 meyer lemon, (juiced and zest freshly grated)
  • 1 garlic clove, (finely minced)
  • ¼ teaspoon freshly cracked black pepper
  • Pinch of salt
  • 2 tablespoons crumbled feta cheese
  • 2 tablespoons sliced almonds, (toasted if you wish!)
  • 2 tablespoons chopped fresh herbs, (like parsley or basil)
  1. Preheat the oven to 400 degrees F. Line a baking sheet with parchment or foil.
  2. Slice the spaghetti squash in half lengthwise, right down the center. Scrape out the seeds (I like to use a grapefruit spoon for this) and place it on a baking sheet. Spritz or brush it with olive oil and sprinkle with salt and pepper.
  3. Roast the squash for 30 to 35 minutes, or until the strands easily scrape away from the sides.
  4. Right before the squash is finished roasting, heat a skillet over medium-low heat and add the butter. Once melted, stir in the garlic and cook for 30 seconds. Stir in the lemon juice, zest and a sprinkle of salt and pepper. Bring the mixture to a simmer then turn off the heat.
  5. Once the squash is all scraped from the skins, place it in a bowl or on a plate and gently toss with the lemon butter. I kind of swirl it with my fork so most of the pieces get coated. Sprinkle on the feta, almonds and herbs. Serve immediately!

My day is actually happier now thanks to this.

The post Lemon Butter Spaghetti Squash with Feta. appeared first on How Sweet Eats.