How Long Does That Open Bottle of Wine Last, Really?

Internet memes may tell you “there’s no such thing as leftover wine.”—a joke about drinking that misses the point that very often in daily life we might not finish an open bottle. If we do have leftovers, the conventional wisdom is that the clock is …

Internet memes may tell you “there’s no such thing as leftover wine.”—a joke about drinking that misses the point that very often in daily life we might not finish an open bottle. If we do have leftovers, the conventional wisdom is that the clock is ticking, since wine is best the same day it’s opened, or should be consumed by the next day at most. This is frustrating, though, if you don’t want to drink that opened wine the very next day or if you don’t have the chance, especially when the leftovers are of a great quality. And pouring “old” wine out feels like a waste. Many of us will ask under these circumstances, But how bad can it be?

The process that starts when you open a bottle of wine is called aeration, which leads to oxidation, which “increases color change and the loss of fruity characteristics,” according to professor Gavin Sacks, Professor of Enology and Viticulture in the Department of Food Science at Cornell University. It also “leads to the loss of sulphur dioxide, which preserves the wine,” he says, and dissipates aromas. Even if you put the cork back in, the process continues, since no closure is airtight and oxygen has already been introduced.

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Meet the Home Cook Making Every Ina Garten Recipe—Ever

Trent Pheifer was celebrating. He arranged oysters and clams—lustrous, exposed on the half shell—shrimp, crabs, and four blazing-red lobsters over ice. Among the shellfish menagerie he slipped lemon wedges and three dips: mignonette, cocktail, and must…

Trent Pheifer was celebrating. He arranged oysters and clams—lustrous, exposed on the half shell—shrimp, crabs, and four blazing-red lobsters over ice. Among the shellfish menagerie he slipped lemon wedges and three dips: mignonette, cocktail, and mustard sauce. The impressive spread was to commemorate a milestone for Pheifer: Over the course of five years, he has cooked more than 1,000 of Ina Garten’s recipes. And in a little over a year from now, he’ll have cooked his way through her entire culinary oeuvre.

Pheifer began his project, Store Bought Is Fine, five years ago (October 10 is the official anniversary). In the years since its inception, he’s learned a bevy of culinary techniques, sharpened his photography skills, amassed a sizable online following, and even met his culinary idol. What began as a whim has become an all-consuming and life-altering project.

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Run a Business, Raise My Daughter & Keep My Cool? Here’s How That’s Going.

Six months ago, I was on the way home from the canceled Natural Products Expo when news broke about cases of coronavirus in New York City. Walking through the terminal at JFK, I saw people in masks for the first time. Nobody on the flight from L.A. had…

Six months ago, I was on the way home from the canceled Natural Products Expo when news broke about cases of coronavirus in New York City. Walking through the terminal at JFK, I saw people in masks for the first time. Nobody on the flight from L.A. had had one on, including me.

The city was on the verge of quarantine. My daughter Ramona’s school transitioned to wholly remote learning. I felt lucky that my business had been deemed essential, but with my kid thrown into the equation, everything changed. How would I manage full-time motherhood on top of full-time entrepreneurship? It seemed impossible, but I needed the money.

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You’re Invited to Food52’s Holiday Swap—2020-Style

For 11 years, Food52 has been a gathering place for people who believe food is the center of a life well-lived. We support and connect home cooks of all stripes; share the handiest tools for every room in the home; and work with writers from around the…

For 11 years, Food52 has been a gathering place for people who believe food is the center of a life well-lived. We support and connect home cooks of all stripes; share the handiest tools for every room in the home; and work with writers from around the world to bring back delicious recipes and heartwarming stories.

Our community is the backbone of Food52 and has been since the start—but is especially important this year. While we can't necessarily be with friends and loved ones in person, we can connect with and celebrate them in other ways, and spread a little joy while we're at it. Food52ers are experts at this.

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Your Very Best Snack Cakes, Right This Way

Cakes for anytime!

As a global pandemic wages on and many of us work to balance our jobs (virtually or away from home), manage virtual learning for kids, and care for loved ones, it is an ideal time to think about a low-stress, sweet pick-me-up for an…

Cakes for anytime!

As a global pandemic wages on and many of us work to balance our jobs (virtually or away from home), manage virtual learning for kids, and care for loved ones, it is an ideal time to think about a low-stress, sweet pick-me-up for any day or time. This is especially true as we approach the impending holiday season that may look quite different from holidays in years past. Enter the snack cake.

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The Story Behind Sami Tamimi & Tara Wigley’s Un-Mess-Upable Shakshuka

The Genius Recipe Tapes is a weekly show from Food52’s new podcast network, featuring all the uncut gems from the weekly Genius Recipes column and video series. This week, Kristen spoke with co-authors Sami Tamimi and Tara Wigley about their new book F…

The Genius Recipe Tapes is a weekly show from Food52's new podcast network, featuring all the uncut gems from the weekly Genius Recipes column and video series. This week, Kristen spoke with co-authors Sami Tamimi and Tara Wigley about their new book Falastin. This transcript has been edited and condensed for clarity.


This week on The Genius Recipe Tapes, Falastin co-authors Sami Tamimi and Tara Wigley join Kristen to discuss what it was like for Sami to rediscover and reimagine foods of his childhood, why Tara is a pathological quadruple-batcher, and the stress-free Scrambled Red Shakshuka from their book.

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A Sticky, Peanutty Tempeh to Win Weeknight Dinner

“The first time I watched the sky bleed tones of orange and red as the sun set over the sea in my father’s home town of Kupang, Timor,” Coconut & Sambal author Lara Lee writes, “it struck me as a moment of coming home—but to a place I had never bee…

“The first time I watched the sky bleed tones of orange and red as the sun set over the sea in my father’s home town of Kupang, Timor,” Coconut & Sambal author Lara Lee writes, “it struck me as a moment of coming home—but to a place I had never been before.”

Growing up in Sydney with an Australian mother and a Chinese-Indonesian father and grandmother instilled in Lee a sense of longing for home—wherever, whatever that may be—at a very young age. As an adult, she began cooking professionally, and that back-of-mind longing quickly evolved into a front-of-mind mission:

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The #1 Book for All Things Vegetable

This review is part of our community-driven book tournament, The Big Community Book-Off. With your help, we’re finding the best books across categories (from bread to pasta, one-bowl to weeknight-friendly, and cake to cookies, to name a few), and putti…

This review is part of our community-driven book tournament, The Big Community Book-Off. With your help, we’re finding the best books across categories (from bread to pasta, one-bowl to weeknight-friendly, and cake to cookies, to name a few), and putting them through a series of rigorous reviews—considered, tested, and written by none other than you. And so, let’s hand it off to our community members Erin, Ruth, and Shereen. Here are their reviews of your five favorite vegetable-forward books—and their nail-biting verdict on which one reigned supreme.


When a Food52 editor connected the three of us over email, we quickly figured out what we had in common. Nope, we’re not vegetarians, not one of us. But we’re all obsessed with fresh produce and cook vegetarian much of the time.

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How Carla Hall Bakes (& Eats) A Perfect Biscuit

The Genius Recipe Tapes is a weekly show from Food52’s new podcast network, featuring all the uncut gems from the weekly Genius Recipes column and video series. This week, Kristen spoke with chef, cookbook author, and TV personality Carla Hall. This tr…

The Genius Recipe Tapes is a weekly show from Food52's new podcast network, featuring all the uncut gems from the weekly Genius Recipes column and video series. This week, Kristen spoke with chef, cookbook author, and TV personality Carla Hall. This transcript has been edited and condensed for clarity.


As Kristen announced a few weeks ago, over the past few months, we've been hard at work on a fun, new project: The Genius Recipe Tapes—aka more genius, and now for your ears.

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What’s the Difference Between Champagne, Prosecco & Cava?

When given the choice, I almost always would like a glass of sparkling wine to drink. (Well… unless I want a Manhattan.)
But while I am an enthusiastic appreciator and I extend my love to virtually any wine with bubbles, sparkling wine is by no mean…

When given the choice, I almost always would like a glass of sparkling wine to drink. (Well... unless I want a Manhattan.)

But while I am an enthusiastic appreciator and I extend my love to virtually any wine with bubbles, sparkling wine is by no means a single thing. It’s an umbrella category, and though we often speak of different types of sparkling wine in the same breath, there are differences in how they are produced, the grapes they use, and how they taste.

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