Easy No-Knead Cinnamon Bun Bread

Easy No-Knead Cinnamon Bun Bread

Freshly baked cinnamon buns are one of the most indulgent baked goods that you can treat yourself to. But it takes time and effort to put together a batch of made-from-scratch cinnamon buns, and there are often times when you might want to treat yourself without waiting around. This Easy …

The post Easy No-Knead Cinnamon Bun Bread appeared first on Baking Bites.

Easy No-Knead Cinnamon Bun Bread

Freshly baked cinnamon buns are one of the most indulgent baked goods that you can treat yourself to. But it takes time and effort to put together a batch of made-from-scratch cinnamon buns, and there are often times when you might want to treat yourself without waiting around. This Easy No-Knead Cinnamon Bun Bread is a recipe for a yeast bread that tastes just like cinnamon buns – completely with sweet cinnamon swirls in the dough – but can be made in a matter of minutes with no rolling required.

This bread starts with a yeast dough that can be mixed up in one bowl. It can be made with active dry or rapid rise yeast. The dough is quite wet and doesn’t require any kneading to get it to come together – in fact, you can easily mix it up by hand using only a spatula. Once the dough is mixed up, transfer it to a baking dish and allow it to rest for a few minutes before adding the cinnamon bun topping.

The topping for this bread is basically the same mixture that you would use as a filling in a more traditional cinnamon bun. It is a mixture of butter, brown sugar and cinnamon that is stirred together until it is moist and uniform. The mixture is sprinkled evenly on top of the rested dough and pressed in with your fingertips. This method is the same one that I use to add “dimples” to focaccia bread: pushing your fingertips firmly down into the dough to make indentations. In this recipe, it pushes the filling into the dough, which creates pockets and swirls when the bread bakes.

While the bread is rested for a short time during the preparation process, it doesn’t need to rise until it is doubled in size. It will actually rise a bit more in the oven as it starts to bake! The bread will spring back when pressed at the end of the baking time and the cinnamon-sugar mixture will be bubbling deliciously around the edges of the pan. Allow the bread to cool for at least 30 minutes before adding a vanilla drizzle and cutting it up to serve. The bread is at its best the day it is baked, but leftovers can be reheated the next day, as well.

This simple recipe doesn’t require any previous baking experience, so don’t be afraid to get your hands in the dough – minimally, of course! – and give this delicious cinnamon bun bread a try!

Easy No-Knead Cinnamon Bun Bread
2 cups all purpose flour
1/3 cup sugar
1/4 tsp salt
4 tsp active dry or rapid rise yeast
2/3 cup warm milk (100-110F; low fat is fine)
4 tbsp vegetable oil
1/2 tsp vanilla extract
1 large egg

Filling/Topping
4 tbsp butter, room temperature
3/4 cup brown sugar
1 1/2 tsp ground cinnamon
1/4 tsp salt

Icing
1 cup powdered sugar
1-2 tbsp milk
1/2 tsp vanilla extract

Lightly grease an 8×8-inch square baking pan.
In a large bowl, combine flour, sugar and salt. Dissolve the yeast in a measuring cup filled with the warmed milk and allow it to sit for 5 minutes, until slightly foamy. Then stir milk mixture, vegetable oil, vanilla extract and egg into the flour mixture. Mix well, until very smooth. Transfer the dough (it will be a very soft dough) into prepared pan, cover with plastic wrap and let rest for 15 minutes.
While the dough rests, prepare the filling. Mix together butter, brown sugar, cinnamon and salt in a small bowl using a fork or spatula until all the butter has been incorporated into the sugar and mixture is crumbly. Sprinkle evenly on top of rested dough and press the mixture down into the dough with your fingertips. You do not need to try to stir in the topping, but leave the dough with deep “dimples” all over the surface. Cover with plastic wrap and let rest for 15 more minutes
Preheat oven to 350F. Bake for about 30 minutes, until bread is lightly browned at the edges and the center of the bread springs back when lightly pressed. The sugar mixture on top may still be bubbling.
Cool for at least 30 minutes before whisking the powdered sugar, milk and vanilla together to form an icing and drizzling it onto the bread.
Serve warm or at room temperature.

Serves 9.

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Sourdough Focaccia (no-knead)

As an obsession with sourdough bread has occurred, my attention has turned to alternative uses for my starter, other than boules. It turns out that sourdough focaccia is my new favourite go-to bread to make! It’s got a very similar dough method to my standard boule but it’s ready the same day the dough is made and it’s a lot easier to shape/bake (no banneton, no shaping, no dutch oven needed!). All you need is a bowl, a baking tray and a HOT oven! I am also notoriously bad at slicing bread boules (TOO crusty and also very prone to becoming slanted when I cut them!) so focaccia is my bestie now – it’s very easy to slice into chubby, bubbly hunks. You can split a square of it in half and toast (and eat as you would sliced bread) or just serve in all its glory as a chunk on the side of your dinner! It goes very well with all types of anti-pasti type toppings (chopped tomatoes with balsamic, artichoke hearts, fresh mozzarella, pesto, hummus etc) so makes for a very simple and satisfying dinner. To Fold or Not to Fold? I’ve tested the recipe quite a few […]

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a closeup image of baked sourdough focaccia

As an obsession with sourdough bread has occurred, my attention has turned to alternative uses for my starter, other than boules. It turns out that sourdough focaccia is my new favourite go-to bread to make! It’s got a very similar dough method to my standard boule but it’s ready the same day the dough is made and it’s a lot easier to shape/bake (no banneton, no shaping, no dutch oven needed!). All you need is a bowl, a baking tray and a HOT oven!

sourdough focaccia dough in a baking tray on a counter
holding a slice of sourdough focaccia

I am also notoriously bad at slicing bread boules (TOO crusty and also very prone to becoming slanted when I cut them!) so focaccia is my bestie now – it’s very easy to slice into chubby, bubbly hunks. You can split a square of it in half and toast (and eat as you would sliced bread) or just serve in all its glory as a chunk on the side of your dinner! It goes very well with all types of anti-pasti type toppings (chopped tomatoes with balsamic, artichoke hearts, fresh mozzarella, pesto, hummus etc) so makes for a very simple and satisfying dinner.

To Fold or Not to Fold?

I’ve tested the recipe quite a few times now and so have tried various techniques out on the dough. I compared a version where I performed coil folds every 30 mins for 4 hours (the ‘bulk rise’), with a version where I just left the dough to do its thing (no ‘kneading’) for 4 hours. What surprised me was that both versions turned out extremely well! The no-knead version had less of an open crumb (i.e. fewer large air holes) and was more prone to settling into the tray. Whereas the folded version held its rounded shape a bit more (so spread less in the tin) and had larger air holes. So overall, you can do EITHER method and you’ll get delicious results, it just depends on if you have time to do the folds or not (and depends on if you really want that open crumb).

Overnight Fridge-Rest or Same Day Bake?

Once the dough has had its 4 hours of bulk rising and is plopped into the tray, you can let it prove at room temp and bake the same day OR you can leave it in the fridge overnight. Again, this can be a preference due to timing but also comes down to flavour. If you prefer a more sour-tasting bread, chilling the dough overnight really helps those flavours develop. If you don’t care so much for that flavour and want the bread TODAY, no fridge-rest needed.

unbaked sourdough focaccia dough with rosemery

One set of Coil Folds

One ‘set’ of coil folds

Sourdough Focaccia (No-Knead)

Sourdough Focaccia (No-Knead)

Yield: a 9 x 13-inch focaccia
Prep Time: 6 hours 30 minutes
Cook Time: 25 minutes
Total Time: 6 hours 55 minutes

Ingredients

  • 400g (1 1/2 cups plus 2 tbsp) lukewarm water
  • 1 tbsp granulated sugar
  • 500g (4 cups) white bread flour (strong flour)(see notes for substitutes)
  • 100g (1/2 cup) recently fed sourdough starter (100% hydration)
  • 1 tsp (7g) fine table salt
  • 80ml (1/3 cup) extra virgin olive oil

Instructions

Make the dough:

  1. Combine 385g of the water (i.e. all but 1 tablespoon of the water) and all of the sugar in a large bowl. Mix to combine.
  2. Add the bread flour and mix to form a lumpy dough. Cover (I like to use a bin bag placed over the bowl and clipped at the side, or a shower cap) and leave to rest for 30 minutes.
  3. After 30 minutes, spread the starter over the dough in the bowl. Dimple it in and mix the dough as well as you can in the bowl. I find using my hand, shaped like a claw, with a kind of scooping motion towards the edge of the bowl helpful for this. Once mixed, sprinkle the salt and the reserved 15g (1 tbsp) of water over and mix this in in a similar fashion.

For No-knead bulk rise:

  1. Cover and leave at room temperature for another 4 hours until doubled in size and bubbly (this timing will depend on the weather; my room temp. is generally 22-24°C. Better to go by the increase in volume rather than the suggested time).

OR For Folded bulk rise:

  1. Cover and leave for another 30 minutes at room temperature. After 30 minutes wet your hands and perform a set of coil folds on the dough: coil folding (see video above the recipe card for help) is done by gently lifting the dough up with both (wet) hands cupped underneath, then letting the 'North' edge fold under the dough as you place it back into the bowl. Rotate the bowl 180 degrees so the 'South' edge is now facing 'north'. Lift the dough up again in the same way and let the 'south' edge fold under the dough as you place it back down. Rotate the bowl 90-degrees and then repeat the lifting & lowering for the 'west' and 'east' edges of the dough. This is one 'set' of coil folds.
  2. Cover the dough and leave for another 3.5 hours, performing a set of coil folds every 30 minutes, and covering the dough each time while it rests. The first few coil folds you perform you can be a bit more firm with the dough but as you progress to the later coil folds, try to be gentler so as not to disturb the air in the dough too much.
  3. Straight after your final coil fold, move onto the next step.


Shape:

  1. Drizzle half of the olive oil into a 9 x 13-inch baking tray or roasting dish (I prefer one with high sides but a rimmed baking sheet works). Gently tip the bowl over the tray and coax the dough out as carefully as possible - it should mostly fall out from its own weight. Oil your hands and flip the dough over so that both sides are now covered with a light layer of oil. Use wetted fingertips to very very gently coax the dough into a slight oval shape, trying not to deflate the dough or stretch it too much. It will spread out more as it rises so don't worry about making it reach the edges of the tray.


To Bake the same day:

  1. Leave uncovered in a warm place for 2-5 hours until very puffy - almost doubled in volume - and bubbly. Again this will depend on the temp of your room so will be quicker in warmer months.
  2. When ready to bake, preheat the oven to 220°C fan (430°F) / 240°C non-fan (460°F).
  3. Drizzle the remaining olive oil over the dough and use your fingertips to press down into the dough all over, making deep dimples for the oil to pool in. Sprinkle with some flakey salt, add any other toppings like rosemary sprigs, and bake for 20-25 minutes, rotating the tray halfway through the baking time to ensure an even bake. It should be golden all over with some more well-browned patches.


OR To Bake tomorrow:

  1. Chill the dough overnight (10-12 hours). An hour before you want to bake it, remove from the fridge and leave at room temp to warm up a bit.
  2. When ready to bake, preheat the oven to 220°C fan (430°F) / 240°C non-fan (460°F).
  3. Drizzle the remaining olive oil over the dough and use your fingertips to press down into the dough all over, making deep dimples for the oil to pool in. Sprinkle with some flakey salt, add any other toppings like rosemary sprigs, and bake for 20-25 minutes, rotating the tray halfway through the baking time to ensure an even bake. It should be golden all over with some more well-browned patches.

Tip: Allow to cool before removing from the tray, slicing and eating. If you find the dough is stuck to your tray, use a metal spatula or offset cake spatula to coax it away from the tray (It should be quite a flexible loaf so don't worry if it bends a bit as you do this).

Notes

Substituting flours: you can use up to 250g of wholemeal bread flour in place of white bread flour in this recipe, if you'd like. You can also use plain white flour (all purpose flour) in the loaf, it just won't be as chewy & open-crumbed.

Recently fed starter = your starter should be bubbly and pass the float test.

Have you made this recipe?
I’d love to see how it went! Tag me on instagram @izyhossack and hashtag it #topwithcinnamon so I can have a look & reshare in my stories!

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English Muffin Batter Bread

English Muffin Batter Bread

English muffins are one of my favorite breads to toast. They not only have a great flavor, but they are full of nooks and crannies to fill with butter and jam. You can make them at home, but it’s much easier to make this English Muffin Batter Bread, instead! …

The post English Muffin Batter Bread appeared first on Baking Bites.

English Muffin Batter Bread

English muffins are one of my favorite breads to toast. They not only have a great flavor, but they are full of nooks and crannies to fill with butter and jam. You can make them at home, but it’s much easier to make this English Muffin Batter Bread, instead! The yeast bread is called a batter bread because it is made from a batter and requires no kneading. The finished batter bread captures the flavor of an english muffin in a loaf form that anyone can bake.

When I say that this bread requires no kneading, I’m not kidding! It can be mixed up in one bowl and doesn’t require any special tools to make, although you will need active dry yeast for this recipe. Once the yeast has bloomed, all the ingredients are combined into a thick, smooth batter that is poured into a grease loaf pan to rise. After an hour or so, it goes directly into the oven to bake.

The finished bread has a fairly open texture that is similar to the holey-texture of an English muffin. The baking soda in the batter helps to create this texture. While it is added as leavening in many quick breads, baking soda is in this recipe to supplement the yeast. It begins to react as soon as it is stirred into the batter, creating all kinds of tiny air bubbles. As the bread rises and bakes, these bubbles expand even more and then set – leaving you with a bread that is a fantastic texture for toasting.

English Muffin Batter Bread

Don’t forget to lightly grease your loaf pan before pouring in the batter to ensure that your loaf comes out easily. Allow it to cool completely before slicing it into thick pieces with a serrated knife. The bread is good on its own, but it really shines after it has been toasted and that is my favorite way to serve it. The bread will keep for at least a day or two after baking, in the event that you can’t eat it all in one day.

(Note: This post originally appeared in September 2005. The post has been updated, but it’s amazing that this recipe is just as popular then as it is now!)

English Muffin Batter Bread
3/4 cup water, warm (approximately 100-110 F)
1/4 ounce active dry yeast (1 package/ 2 1/2 tsp)
2 tsp sugar
3 cups all purpose flour, divided
1 tsp salt
1/4 tsp baking soda
1/2 cup milk, warm (approximately 100-110 F)

Lightly grease a 9×5-inch loaf pan.
In a small bowl, 1/4 cup of water with active dry yeast and sugar. Stir, then allow mixture to sit for 5 minutes until yeast is foamy.
Transfer yeast mixture to a large bowl, along 2 cups of flour, salt, baking soda, milk and remaining water. Mix until a smooth batter forms. Gradually stir in remaining flour until batter is thick and uniform. This can also be done in the stand mixer using a dough hook.
Pour batter into prepared pan and cover with plastic wrap.
Allow dough to rise in a warm place for 1 hour, or until about doubled in size.
Preheat the oven to 400 F. Bake the loaf for about 30 minutes, until the top of the loaf is golden and it sounds hollow when tapped. An instant read thermometer inserted into the center of the loaf should read 190-200F.
Turn bread out onto a wire rack to cool completely before slicing.

Makes 1 loaf.

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Easy No Knead Bread

This homemade no knead bread will wow everyone! It’s so easy to make and has the best flavor, crispy crust, and chewy interior. Great for beginners! Want to bake easy homemade bread, but not sure where to start? Try this best no knead bread recipe! Your friends and family will sing your praises. Neighbors following the wafting smell will come flocking. You’ll get multiple marriage proposals. Yes, this bread is life changing! It’s got the best flavor: lightly tangy and robust. The exterior is the perfect crisp crust, and the interior has the perfect moist chewiness. Even better: it’s our easiest bread recipe yet. If you’re a bread baking beginner, this is the place to start. Want an even quicker loaf bread? Try our Easy Homemade Bread or Easy Whole Wheat Bread, which are made with a loaf pan and take just 2.5 hours. How to make no knead bread: an overview! Here’s the basic outline of what you’re getting yourself into with no knead bread. The process takes 5 minutes the night before, and then about 2 hours the day of. Compared to our sourdough bread and even our artisan bread, it’s the quickest and easiest bread recipe we have. (But if you want to […]

A Couple Cooks – Healthy, Whole Food, & Vegetarian Recipes

This homemade no knead bread will wow everyone! It’s so easy to make and has the best flavor, crispy crust, and chewy interior. Great for beginners!

No knead bread

Want to bake easy homemade bread, but not sure where to start? Try this best no knead bread recipe! Your friends and family will sing your praises. Neighbors following the wafting smell will come flocking. You’ll get multiple marriage proposals. Yes, this bread is life changing! It’s got the best flavor: lightly tangy and robust. The exterior is the perfect crisp crust, and the interior has the perfect moist chewiness. Even better: it’s our easiest bread recipe yet. If you’re a bread baking beginner, this is the place to start.

Want an even quicker loaf bread? Try our Easy Homemade Bread or Easy Whole Wheat Bread, which are made with a loaf pan and take just 2.5 hours.

How to make no knead bread: an overview!

Here’s the basic outline of what you’re getting yourself into with no knead bread. The process takes 5 minutes the night before, and then about 2 hours the day of. Compared to our sourdough bread and even our artisan bread, it’s the quickest and easiest bread recipe we have. (But if you want to make a bread recipe in one day, the artisan bread is your best option.) Here’s an outline of what you’ll have to do:

Mix, Rest overnight5 minutes active, 12 to 18 hours hands off
Shape & Proof5 minutes active, 1 hour hands off
Bake40 minutes, hands off
Cool45 minutes, hands off
Easy no knead bread

Equipment list for no knead bread

Making no knead bread requires a few tools. It’s easiest to make with a Dutch oven, but you can also use a pizza stone. There are several optional tools as well that make things easier, but are not required. Here’s what you need!

Required tools for this artisan bread recipe

  1. Large dutch oven OR pizza stone with steam (see below)
  2. Plastic bag for proofing (reuse it every time you make bread) or plastic wrap
  3. Parchment paper
  4. Lame OR sharp knife for scoring the bread
  5. Kitchen scale for measuring (optional)

The flours you’ll use

This best easy no knead bread recipe uses a mix of just two flours you’ll probably already have in your pantry. Unlike some of our other bread recipes, there’s no need for bread flour. Here’s what you’ll need:

  • All-purpose flour (for texture
  • Whole wheat flour (for flavor)
How to bake bread

Think ahead! No knead bread rests overnight

This bread requires thinking ahead 1 day ahead. You’ll need to rest the bread dough overnight. Why? Well, the answer has to do with proofing.

  • No knead bread requires only 1 proof. Proofing is simply letting the bread stand at room temperature while the leavener (yeast or sourdough) does its magic to help the bread rise. Usually a proof is about 45 minutes to 1 hour. Both our sourdough bread and artisan bread require folding and “proofing” the bread multiple times. So doing only 1 proof is almost unheard of!
  • The tradeoff? Resting overnight. Proofing is hands off, but it does require a lot of time to fold and proof multiple times. The tradeoff: you’ll need to rest the bread at room temperature overnight. To us, that’s a very worthy tradeoff! You save hours of bread making time the day of baking.

How to shape the boule

The main part of making no knead bread that requires technique is shaping the dough. You’ll shape it into a ball, called a boule. It’s easiest to learn how to shape the dough by watching. Here’s a video instruction for shaping the boule.

Homemade no knead bread

How to score the bread

See those beautiful lines on the top of the artisan bread? Those are called score lines. Scoring is slashing the top of the dough with a sharp knife to allow it to expand when baking. You can also make a decorative sort of pattern on the bread. Here are a few tips for scoring no knead bread:

  • Use your sharpest knife, or a lame. You’ll want the knife to be ultra sharp. We purchased a lame for this, since we make lots of bread recipes.
  • Make shallow cuts into the top of the dough. You want to cut just the surface — if it’s too deep it collapses, if it’s too shallow it bursts. Alex did this cross pattern for the bread scoring in this photo!

What’s a Dutch oven? Do I need it?

This easy no knead bread is best when baked in a Dutch oven. Why? Baking bread in a covered Dutch oven holds in the steam that the bread releases as it cooks. This makes an extra crispy crust & perfect rise. If you don’t have a Dutch oven, you can use a pizza stone (see below).

What is a Dutch oven? It’s a heavy cooking pot with a lid used for braising meat and making soups and stews. You can use it on the stovetop or in the oven. All Dutch ovens are made of cast iron; some have an enamel coating that makes them easier to clean.

Best no knead bread

Or, use a pizza stone to bake no knead bread!

You also can use a pizza stone to bake this no knead bread! The best way is with a Dutch oven, but if you don’t have one you can use a pizza stone. You’ll also have to make extra steam in your oven. To do that, you’ll use a baking sheet and pour boiling water onto it right when you add the bread. This creates steam, which makes that crispy crust.

Storing no knead bread

Because this no knead bread has no preservatives, so the storage recommendations are different from a bread you might buy from the store. Here’s what to do:

  • Room temperature storage (2 days): Once you’ve baked your homemade bread, it is best eaten within 48 hours. We store ours wrapped in cloth at room temperature. Use a clean dish towel or a bread bag.
  • Frozen (3 months): Or, you can freeze it! It’s easy to cut your bread in half and freeze half of it! Let it cool to room temperature, then cut it into slices and place it into a sealed bag or container.
Best easy no knead bread

This no knead bread recipe is…

Vegetarian, vegan, plant-based, and dairy free.

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No knead bread

Easy No Knead Bread Recipe


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  • Author: Sonja Overhiser
  • Prep Time: 1 hour 30 minutes (including overnight)
  • Cook Time: 40 minutes
  • Total Time: 2 hours 10 minutes
  • Yield: 12 to 14 slices
  • Diet: Vegan

Description

This homemade no knead bread will wow everyone! It’s so easy to make and has the best flavor, crispy crust, and chewy interior. Great for beginners!


Ingredients

  • 3 cups all purpose flour (375 grams)
  • 1/2 cup whole wheat flour (62 grams)
  • 1/2 teaspoon instant or active dry yeast
  • 9 grams 1 1/2 teaspoons kosher salt
  • 1 1/3 cups water (314 grams)
  • 1 tablespoon apple cider vinegar (15 grams)

Instructions

  1. Mix the dough & rest overnight: In medium bowl, stir together the all purpose flour, whole wheat flour, yeast and salt. Add the warm water and vinegar and stir with a wooden spoon or dough whisk until all flour is incorporated. Place the bowl in a proofing bag or cover with plastic wrap. Rest at room temperature overnight (12 to 18 hours). The resulting dough will be bubbly and very sticky.
  2. Shape the dough: When ready to bake, remove the dough from the bowl onto a clean, lightly-floured countertop. Gently spread the dough into a square and then fold up each side into a packet. Flip the dough over. Place your hands behind the dough and gently pull the dough towards you to increase the tension on the surface of the dough. Rotate and repeat until you have a boule shape. Follow this video tutorial for boule shaping technique.
  3. Proof the dough for 1 hour: Place the boule on a piece of parchment paper about twice the width of the boule. Cover the dough with an inverted large bowl and rest one hour.
  4. Preheat the oven: Preheat the Dutch oven (with lid) at 475°F for 30 minutes. (Or for the pizza stone method, place the pizza stone on middle rack of oven, off to one side. Place a cast iron pan or thickest baking sheet on the rack just below and off to the other side of oven. You’ll pour water into it later to create steam.)
  5. Score the bread: Use a sharp knife or lame to cut several shallow slits at angle across the top of the dough. The photographs show this cross pattern.
  6. Bake for 16 minutes: Working quickly and carefully with oven gloves or mitts, transfer the dough on the parchment paper to the preheated Dutch oven, then place the top on. Bake for 16 minutes. (Or for the pizza stone method, transfer the dough on the parchment paper to the preheated pizza stone. After the bread is on the the stone, make the steam: cover your hand with a towel and very carefully pour 1 cup of water onto the cast-iron pan or baking sheet, then immediately close the door.
  7. Reduce to 400°F and bake for 25 to 27 minutes: After the 16 minutes, reduce the oven temperature to 400°F. Remove the Dutch oven, carefully take out the bread, and set the bread directly onto the oven rack. (Or for the pizza oven method, open the oven door a couple of times to fan out excess moist air.) Bake for an additional 25 to 27 minutes, until hollow when tapped or internal temperature is at 205 to 209 Fahrenheit. Remove the bread from the oven and allow it to cool on a cooling rack for at least 45 minutes. After cooling, the bread is ready to eat. Store the bread wrapped in cloth or in a bread bag on the counter for up to 2 days, or freeze (sliced) wrapped in foil in a plastic bag for several months.

  • Category: Bread
  • Method: Baked
  • Cuisine: Artisan

Keywords: No Knead Bread, No Knead Bread Recipe, Easy Bread, Easy Bread Recipe

Easy no knead bread
No knead bread

A Couple Cooks - Healthy, Whole Food, & Vegetarian Recipes