Irish Brown Bread

A couple of years ago I made my first loaf of Irish Soda Bread for St. Patrick’s Day, and instantly fell in love. I loved the thick, hearty texture and simple, yet complex, flavor. It’s perfect for toasting and slathering with butter and jam, to soak up extra broth from your favorite Irish stew or […]

The post Irish Brown Bread appeared first on Brown Eyed Baker.

A couple of years ago I made my first loaf of Irish Soda Bread for St. Patrick’s Day, and instantly fell in love. I loved the thick, hearty texture and simple, yet complex, flavor. It’s perfect for toasting and slathering with butter and jam, to soak up extra broth from your favorite Irish stew or to eat alongside corned beef hash. Any way you cut it, it’s a fabulous bread that I have enjoyed over and over since first trying it. This year, I started seeing mention of Irish brown bread and went about trying to find some authentic recipes. Well, I found tons. And they all seemed to contradict each other in terms of what makes Irish brown bread truly “authentic” – some had to contain oats, some said absolutely no eggs, some said only four ingredients, and the list goes on and on. In the end it seemed that there was no one set of rules for Irish brown bread and I decided on this version from David Lebovitz’ blog, which comes from the chef/owner of Longueville House in Ireland.

I loved this version because it included such a wide variety of flours and grains – all-purpose flour, whole wheat flour, and a combination of wheat bran and wheat germ. I used a stone-ground whole wheat flour and oat bran since I didn’t have any wheat bran or wheat germ on hand. It takes the hearty texture of the bread to a whole new level and is absolutely, utterly delicious. I cut the original recipe in half since the original calls for such a large amount of flour. David suggested dividing the recipe into two loaves, but I just halved it and made one. For the full recipe, be sure to check out David’s blog.

I think I am now officially converted to the brown bread version of Irish soda bread – it’s delish!

One year ago: Asiago Bagels
Two years ago: Baked Oatmeal
Three years ago: Royal Crown’s Tortano
Four years ago: Mexican Rice

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Irish Brown Bread

A classic bread recipe from Ireland
Course Bread
Cuisine Irish
Prep Time 10 minutes
Cook Time 35 minutes
Total Time 45 minutes
Servings 8 servings (1 loaf)
Calories 223kcal
Author Michelle

Ingredients

  • 1 cup + 1½ teaspoons whole wheat flour
  • ½ cup + 1½ teaspoons wheat bran oat bran or wheat germ, or a combination
  • 2 cups all-purpose flour
  • ¾ teaspoon baking soda
  • ½ teaspoon salt
  • 2 tablespoons unsalted butter cold and cut into small pieces
  • cups buttermilk
  • 1 teaspoon molasses

Instructions

  • 1. Preheat oven to 350 degrees F. Line a baking sheet with parchment paper or a silicone baking mat and put it on the center oven rack.
  • 2. Whisk together the whole wheat flour and wheat/oat bran or wheat germ in a large bowl.
  • 3. In a medium bowl, whisk together the all-purpose flour, baking soda and salt. Add to the wheat flour mixture and whisk to combine.
  • 4. Add the butter pieces and rub them into small pieces with the flour mixture using your fingers, until as small as possible.
  • 5. Stir in the buttermilk and molasses until the dough is uniformly damp. Turn out onto a lightly floured countertop and knead gently, until the dough forms a smooth ball.
  • 6. Use a sharp serrated knife (or a lame) to slice a cross deeply into the top of the bread, about 1-inch deep. Place the loaf on the hot baking sheet.
  • 7. Bake for about 30 to 35 minutes, or until the loaf is firm on top and when you tap the bottom, feels hollow.
  • 8. Remove from the oven and cool on a wire rack for about one hour before serving.

Nutrition

Calories: 223kcal | Carbohydrates: 39g | Protein: 7g | Fat: 4g | Saturated Fat: 2g | Cholesterol: 11mg | Sodium: 289mg | Potassium: 194mg | Fiber: 4g | Sugar: 2g | Vitamin A: 150IU | Calcium: 57mg | Iron: 2.4mg

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Super Crunchy Oil Free Granola

With as many beans as I eat, it’s about time I started using putting the aquafaba to good use. I’ve been playing around with aquafaba for the past couple of months and I think this Super Crunchy Oil Free Granola is my favorite use so far! The starchy bean water binds the granola into crunchy […]

The post Super Crunchy Oil Free Granola appeared first on Budget Bytes.

With as many beans as I eat, it’s about time I started using putting the aquafaba to good use. I’ve been playing around with aquafaba for the past couple of months and I think this Super Crunchy Oil Free Granola is my favorite use so far! The starchy bean water binds the granola into crunchy clumps, without the use of excessive oils and sugars, like traditional granola. And no, the end product doesn’t smell or taste like beans. 😅

Never heard of aquafaba? Scroll down for a little crash course…

A sheet pan of Super Crunchy Oil Free Granola next to a bowl with yogurt, banana, and granola, and a half eaten banana.

What is Aquafaba?

Aquafaba is the slightly goopy water that usually gets discarded from a can of beans. The soluble starches from the cooked beans give this strange liquid surprising properties that allow it to be whipped like egg whites and act as a binder in food. Absolute liquid gold for people looking for a vegan substitution for eggs! While it can’t be used as a sub for eggs in every recipe, it works for quite a few.

I suggest using the liquid from canned chickpeas over any other bean. Chickpea aquafaba is the most neutral, or has the least amount of color and flavor. Definitely stay away from black bean or kidney bean aquafaba, as they’ll be dark in color. I have used aquafaba from cannellini beans before, but chickpea aquafaba definitely has less flavor.

What is Cream of Tartar?

Cream of tartar, or tartaric acid, is an acid in powder form, and is a good ingredient to keep stashed in the back of your pantry. It has a few unique uses in the kitchen, including being the secret ingredient that turns baking soda into baking powder. In this granola recipe, cream of tartar is used to stabilize the aquafaba and make it easier to whip into a dense foam. Without a pinch of cream of tartar it can take up to ten minutes to properly whip aquafaba. With cream of tartar it takes only about three minutes.

A bowl of yogurt with banana slices and Super Crunchy Oil Free Granola

Super Crunchy Oil Free Granola Substitutes and Options

This recipe is super flexible and can be a great way to use up leftover dry goods in your pantry. The spice mix and the grains, nuts, and seeds, can all be swapped out to match your preferences. 

When substituting the grains, nuts, and seeds in this recipe, just try to have about 3 cups total dry goods, in a ratio of about 2 cups grains to 1 cup nuts and seeds. Other nuts and seeds that you can use are: chia, sunflower, sesame, pecans, walnuts, or hemp. 

Sweeten it up!

I purposely made this Super Crunchy Oil Free Granola very low in sugar. You can increase the sugar amount to fit your taste buds (the uncooked granola is safe to taste). You can also substitute maple syrup for the brown sugar in this recipe, although it does make the mixture a bit more wet, resulting in a slightly longer baking time.

A sheet pan full of Super Crunchy Oil Free Granola with a large wooden spoon scooping it up.

This black and white splatter baking sheet is from Roveandswig.com.

 

Super Crunchy Oil Free Granola

Aquafaba (the leftover starchy water from canned beans) makes this Oil Free Granola super crunchy without using excessive amounts of oil and sugar! 

  • 1/2 cup aquafaba ($0.25)
  • 1/8 tsp cream of tartar ($0.01)
  • 1/4 cup brown sugar ($0.16)
  • 1/2 tsp vanilla extract ($0.14)
  • 2 cups rolled oats ($0.33)
  • 1/4 cup oat bran ($0.18)
  • 1/4 cup ground flaxseed ($0.12)
  • 1/4 cup slivered almonds ($0.48)
  • 1/4 cup pepitas ($.060)
  • 1/2 tsp cinnamon ($0.05)
  • 1/2 tsp turmeric ($0.05)
  • 1/4 tsp ground ginger ($0.03)
  • 1/8 tsp ground cloves ($0.02)
  1. Preheat the oven to 350ºF. Line a large baking sheet with parchment paper.

  2. Add the aquafaba and cream of tartar to a bowl and use an electric hand mixer or stand mixer to whip the aquafaba into stiff peaks. Once the aquafaba is whipped, add the vanilla extract and brown sugar, then whip for another 30 seconds, or until the brown sugar is dissolved into the foam.

  3. In a separate bowl, combine the rolled oats, oat bran, ground flaxseed, almonds, pepitas, cinnamon, turmeric, ground ginger, and ground cloves. Stir until combined.

  4. Pour the oat mixture into the bowl with the whipped and sweetened aquafaba. Stir until the dry ingredients are completely coated in the aquafaba.

  5. Spread the granola mixture onto the lined baking sheet so that it is in a single layer and not piled too deep.

  6. Bake the granola for 20 minutes, then remove it from the oven and give it a gentle stir. Bake for 10 minutes more, and stir a second time. Bake 5 minutes more, or until the granola is dry and the edges are deep golden brown.

  7. Allow the granola to cool and then store in an air-tight container at room temperature.

Love homemade granola? Check out my No Sugar Added Banana Nut Granola!

A sheet pan of Super Crunchy Oil Free Granola next to a bowl with yogurt and granola, and a half eaten banana.

Step by Step Photos

Pour aquafaba from the can of chickpeas into a measuring cup

Preheat the oven to 350ºF. Pour the liquid from a can of chickpeas (aquafaba) into a measuring cup. You’ll need 1/2 cup of aquafaba. One 15oz. can of chickpeas usually has about 3/4 cup, so you should have plenty from one can.

Cream of tartar container held over the measuring cup with aquafaba

Adding a little cream of tartar (tartaric acid) helps make it a LOT easier to whip the aquafaba into a foam. Without the cream of tartar it can take a good ten minutes to whip the aquafaba, with cream of tartar it only takes about 3 minutes. So it’s worth it! Add 1/8 tsp cream of tartar to your aquafaba.

Aquafaba slightly whipped in a metal bowl with a hand mixer.

Use a hand mixer or a stand mixer to begin whipping the aquafaba. I wouldn’t suggest trying to do this one by hand. The aquafaba will look foamy at first, but if you keep going…

Whipped aquafaba in a bowl with a hand mixer

Eventually it will whip into a creamy foam. It’s done when the beaters begin to leave a trail in the foam, like in the photo above.

Brown sugar and vanilla extract added to whipped aquafaba.

Add 1/4 cup brown sugar and 1/2 tsp vanilla extract to the whipped aquafaba.

Sweetened whipped aquafaba in a metal bowl

Whip for another 30 seconds or just until the brown sugar is dissolved into the foam.

Super Crunchy Oil Free Granola Ingredients in a bowl

In a separate bowl, combine your grains, nuts, seeds, and spices. I used 2 cups rolled oats, 1/4 cup oat bran, 1/4 cup ground flaxseed, 1/4 cup slivered almonds, 1/4 cup pepitas, 1/2 tsp cinnamon, 1/2 tsp turmeric, 1/4 tsp ground ginger, and 1/8 tsp ground cloves. Stir these together well.

Combine aquafaba and granola dry ingredients

Add the dry ingredients to the bowl of whipped aquafaba and stir them together.

Super Crunchy Oil Free Granola mixed together in the bowl

Stir until everything is saturated and slightly clumpy.

Oil Free Granola spread over the lined baking sheet.

Line a large baking sheet with parchment, then spread the granola mixture over the surface into a single even layer. BTW, this is a Crow Canyon Enamelware Rectangular Tray from Roveandswig.com.

Baked Oil Free Granola on the baking sheet

Bake the granola in the preheated 350ºF oven for 20 minutes, then give it a good stir. Bake for 10 more minutes and stir again. Then bake for a final 5 minutes, or until the granola is dry and it is deeply golden brown on the edges. Ovens can vary, so keep a close eye on it for those final 10 minutes or so.

Overhead view of the tray full of Super Crunchy Oil Free Granola with a wooden spoon scooping some up in the corner.

Let the granola cool completely, then store it in an air-tight container at room temperature.

The post Super Crunchy Oil Free Granola appeared first on Budget Bytes.