The Storage Hack That Leads to Flakier Pastries

How many times has a pie crust or biscuit or scone recipe insisted that you start with cold butter and make sure it stays cold at all costs?

This, we are told, is the secret to success. Because when cold butter bits nestled in pillowy dough hit a hot …

How many times has a pie crust or biscuit or scone recipe insisted that you start with cold butter and make sure it stays cold at all costs?

This, we are told, is the secret to success. Because when cold butter bits nestled in pillowy dough hit a hot oven, they melt, producing steam, creating layers, yielding flaky baked goods. Hence the proceed-with-caution signs for warm fingertips and summery kitchens.

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Bostock

One of the lesser-known French pastries is Bostock. Perhaps it’s the funny name that doesn’t sound very French, as pain au chocolat or chausson aux pommes do, that’s been keeping it out of the spotlight. True, the name does sound like a Swiss bouillon mix and although I’ve read it’s from Normandy, I haven’t found any conclusive evidence of that. But wherever it’s from, the…

One of the lesser-known French pastries is Bostock. Perhaps it’s the funny name that doesn’t sound very French, as pain au chocolat or chausson aux pommes do, that’s been keeping it out of the spotlight. True, the name does sound like a Swiss bouillon mix and although I’ve read it’s from Normandy, I haven’t found any conclusive evidence of that. But wherever it’s from, the good thing about Bostock is that it’s one of the easiest desserts to make and doesn’t require rolling out any pastry, spending a day making brioche, or rely on any fancy techniques. It’s one of my very favorite things to eat.

Bostock was likely invented to use up leftover brioche that bakeries had on hand after they closed their doors. Bakers everywhere are naturally thrifty and this is a clever way to use up leftover bread, whether it be brioche, challah, or any firm-textured white bread, such as pain de mie.

Continue Reading Bostock...

A Savory-Sweet Pastry Project to Tackle on a Snow Day

After reading through just a few recipes, it’s clear that A Good Bake by Melissa Weller is one of those cookbooks that will be used, not simply admired. Indeed, my own copy bore butter stains within a week.

Read through any publication’s baking covera…

After reading through just a few recipes, it’s clear that A Good Bake by Melissa Weller is one of those cookbooks that will be used, not simply admired. Indeed, my own copy bore butter stains within a week.

Read through any publication's baking coverage and you'll likely spot Weller's name—and maybe her swirled cover-star babka, which she's been making for years. Its mass appeal was the first element that jumped out at me about A Good Bake: I’d be just as inclined to gift a copy to my Julia Child–loving aunt as I would my 23-year-old sister who finds most of her recipes on Instagram.

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Classic Vegan Apple Pie

No one will know this vegan apple pie recipe is plant-based: it’s just as good! The flaky lattice crust encloses a cozy-spiced apple filling. Want to make a show-stopping apple pie…that’s vegan? It’s 100% possible…and delicious. Meet this Classic Vegan Apple Pie! No one would guess that this pie is fully made of plants, because it’s so satisfying. A flaky, golden crust encloses a filling that’s so full of cozy spiced flavor, you won’t want the bite to end. Many of our meals are plant-based around here, so we thought it would be fun to try a vegan spin on our Best Apple Pie. Here are all the tips and tricks for making the most classic apple pie…with no butter to speak of. The key to vegan apple pie: vegan pie crust! The key to this vegan apple pie is vegan pie crust! Turns out, apple pie filling is easy to make with just sugar and spices. Where you need a little help is the buttery pie crust! You can use either coconut oil or vegan butter as a butter substitute in this pastry crust. Here’s what to know about each: Coconut oil vegan pie crust (preferred): The pastry comes out […]

A Couple Cooks – Healthy, Whole Food, & Vegetarian Recipes

No one will know this vegan apple pie recipe is plant-based: it’s just as good! The flaky lattice crust encloses a cozy-spiced apple filling.

Vegan apple pie

Want to make a show-stopping apple pie…that’s vegan? It’s 100% possible…and delicious. Meet this Classic Vegan Apple Pie! No one would guess that this pie is fully made of plants, because it’s so satisfying. A flaky, golden crust encloses a filling that’s so full of cozy spiced flavor, you won’t want the bite to end. Many of our meals are plant-based around here, so we thought it would be fun to try a vegan spin on our Best Apple Pie. Here are all the tips and tricks for making the most classic apple pie…with no butter to speak of.

The key to vegan apple pie: vegan pie crust!

The key to this vegan apple pie is vegan pie crust! Turns out, apple pie filling is easy to make with just sugar and spices. Where you need a little help is the buttery pie crust! You can use either coconut oil or vegan butter as a butter substitute in this pastry crust. Here’s what to know about each:

  • Coconut oil vegan pie crust (preferred): The pastry comes out beautifully crisp and crunchy! We recommend using refined coconut oil, which has less of a coconut-y flavor. This is our preferred method because it’s very consistent.
  • Vegan butter pie crust (optional): The pastry comes out flaky with a little more of a savory, buttery flavor than coconut oil. The exact texture and flavor depends on the brand of vegan butter and what it’s made of. When you’re shopping for vegan butter, check the ingredient lists and find one that is minimally processed with real food ingredients. We like Miyoko’s Vegan Butter, which is made with mostly cashews and coconut: it happens to be organic, too.
Vegan apple pie

Equipment you need for this vegan apple pie recipe

Outside of the butter substitute, making vegan apple pie is exactly the same as standard apple pie! The required equipment is simply a standard pie plate and a rolling pin. But a few additional items can be helpful to this recipe:

  • Standard pie plate: Use a standard 9-inch pie plate, not a deep dish pie plate! If you have one, a metal pie plate can help the bottom crust to come out crispier.
  • Pastry cloth and rolling pin cover: These can help to avoid sticking when you’re rolling out the dough. If you don’t have one, dust your work surface and rolling pin generously with flour as you go.
  • Food scale: In baking it’s helpful to weigh flour because it can change based on environmental conditions. If you don’t have one, just measure the flour in cups and adjust the water as needed.

Variation: vegan apple crumble

Feeling overwhelmed by the process? Here’s an idea: make a Vegan Apple Crumble instead! Apple crumble has a very similar flavor to this apple pie, and it’s loads easier to make. No dough rolling or lattice work necessary! But want to keep going? Keep reading…

Classic vegan apple pie recipe

Best apple for pie: Granny Smith!

What are the best apples for apple pie? We’re glad you asked. First off: if you can, use organic apples. Apples are one of the best fruits to buy organic due to the way that pesticides are used (see the Dirty Dozen list for more). Our favorite type of apple to use for pie is Granny Smith. It’s got the perfect crisp texture and sweet tart flavor. It’s what we recommend hands down. If you prefer using another apple, here are our favorites in order of preference:

  • Granny Smith
  • Honeycrisp
  • Jonathon or Jonagold
  • Gala
  • Ida Red
  • Golden Delicious (do not use Red Delicious)

How to slice apples…fast

Once you’ve got your apples for this vegan apple pie recipe, it can take a while to peel and slice them. But here’s a trick for how to cut them quickly! This method for slicing apples is so slick, you can slice one up in just a few seconds. Review the video below for how to do it:

How to slice apples

How to blind bake the crust

Blind baking is baking a pie crust without the filling. Why do this? It makes sure that crust is perfectly firm before you add the filling. This avoids the soggy bottom problem! It makes a pastry that’s firm and flaky. Here are a few things to know about blind baking this vegan apple pie:

  • Prick holes with a fork all over the crust. This helps it to puff up less while in the oven.
  • Add pie weights: like dried beans or rice! For the baking step, you’ll need pie weights to weigh down the crust so it doesn’t get too puffy. Guess what? You don’t need to buy anything! Use dried beans or dry rice to fill up your pie crust before blind baking. (It doesn’t harm the beans or rice: you can still cook them as normal.) You can also use ceramic pie weights.

How to make a lattice pie crust topping

The main part of this vegan apple pie recipe that requires technique is making the lattice pie crust. Once you’ve done it once, it’s easy to do; but lattice work can be daunting if you’ve never tried it before. Here’s a video showing how to do the lattice weave for the crust. The pieces in the video below are thicker than you’ll use for this pie, but it gives you an idea of the process.

How to make a lattice pie crust

Serving vegan apple pie

What’s the best way to serve this vegan apple pie recipe? It’s actually extremely tasty as is! The crunch of the pie crust with the tangy brightness of the apples doesn’t need much in the way of improvements. It’s perfect for Thanksgiving, Christmas, or as a summer dessert! But if you’re a person who loves apple pie toppings, here are a few vegan ideas for topping it off:

  • Vegan whipped cream: This Dairy Free Whipped Cream is made with coconut milk: and light and airy! It has a faint fruity coconut flavor, but that doesn’t overwhelm the dish.
  • Vegan ice cream: There are lots of options for store-bought vegan ice creams these days. Even better, make our Cinnamon Vegan Ice Cream! It’s extraordinary.

This vegan apple pie recipe is…

Vegetarian, vegan, plant-based, and dairy-free.

Print
Vegan apple pie

Classic Vegan Apple Pie


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  • Author: Sonja Overhiser
  • Prep Time: 1 hour 30 minutes
  • Cook Time: 1 hour
  • Total Time: 2 hours 30 minutes
  • Yield: 8
  • Diet: Vegan

Description

No one will know this vegan apple pie recipe is plant-based: it’s just as good! The flaky lattice crust encloses a cozy-spiced apple filling.


Ingredients

For the crust

  • 2 1/2 cups all purpose flour
  • 1 teaspoon kosher salt
  • 1/2 teaspoon baking powder
  • 1 cup refined coconut oil
  • 3/4 cup water + 3 ice cubes

For the pie

  • 3 pounds organic Granny Smith apples (10 to 11 small)
  • 1 1/2 tablespoons cornstarch
  • 2/3 cup granulated sugar
  • 2 teaspoons ground cinnamon
  • 1/2 teaspoon ground ginger
  • 1/4 teaspoon kosher salt
  • 1 tablespoon vanilla extract
  • 1 teaspoon lemon zest plus 1 1/2 tablespoons lemon juice (about 1/2 lemon)

Instructions

  1. Make the crust: In a medium bowl, mix the all purpose flour, kosher salt, and baking powder. Drop small blobs of the coconut oil into the flour mixture. Then use a pastry cutter to incorporate it into the flour until pebbly (try to make sure there aren’t any large chunks of coconut oil).  Drizzle about 1/2 of the ice water into the flour and bring together with a fork. Continue drizzling until a dough is formed. Use your hands to make it into a dough ball, not too sticky (add a bit more water or flour if necessary). Divide the dough in two and refrigerate it for 30 minutes.
  2. Preheat: Preheat the oven to 375 degrees Fahrenheit. 
  3. Meanwhile, make the filling: Peel and core the apples, then thinly slice them about 1/4 inch thick (see the “How to slice apples” section above). Place the apples in a large pot with a lid or in a Dutch oven. Add in the cornstarch, sugar, cinnamon, ginger, salt, lemon juice and zest, and vanilla. Stir apples to combine. Cover and cook on high heat for 2 minutes without stirring. Remove it from the heat, remove the lid and cool the apples until the pie crust is done blind baking. 
  4. Roll out the first dough: If you have a pastry cloth, set it up and dust it with flour; otherwise, flour a clean work surface. Put on a rolling pin cover and coat the pin in extra flour (optional). Remove one ball of dough from the refrigerator and roll it evenly from the center to the edge, until the dough is a large circle about 1/8-inch thick. If it starts to get sticky, dust lightly with flour. Rest the dough for 3 minutes. Then trim the dough to an even 12-inch circle with a pizza cutter (this corresponds to the 9-inch circle on the pastry cloth).
  5. Blind bake the crust: Gently place the dough into the center of the pie plate, using the rolling pin to transfer it. Use your fingers to press the pastry into the form of the pie pan. Then fold the excess dough around the edges under itself, so that it sits evenly on the rim of the pie plate, then crimp the edge with the tines of a fork. Prick the bottom and sides of the crust with a fork, then cover it with a sheet of parchment paper. Fill the inside with pastry weights like dried beans or rice (or another type of pie weight). Bake the crust for 18 minutes.
  6. Increase the oven temperature: Remove the blind baked pie crust from the oven and place it on a cooling rack. Add a baking sheet to a center rack and increase the oven temperature to 400 degrees Fahrenheit. 
  7. Assemble the pie: Spoon the apple filling into the pie plate with a slotted spoon, leaving the liquid inside the pot. Heat the pot over medium heat for 1 to 2 minutes to thicken the remaining liquid until thickened and syrupy. Then pour the syrup over the apples.
  8. Make the lattice: Roll out the second dough ball into another 12” circle. Cut into 1” strips and use 7 strips to make a lattice. Carefully lay out 4 strips of dough in the same direction on the pie (see the “How to make a lattice pie crust” above). Be careful to place the strips down without stretching. Weave the strips together to create the lattice with the remaining 3 strips. Trim the lattice on the pie to the edge of the pie, then place the remaining strips of the dough around the outside to form an edge around the rim of the pie.
  9. Bake the pie: Place the pie on a baking sheet. Bake for 1 hour until golden brown. Remove from the oven and place on a baking rack. Allow to cool for at least 1 hour until warm, or a few hours until it is room temperature. Then slice into pieces and enjoy! The pie is best eaten the day it is made. For make ahead and reheating instructions, see below.

Notes

Make ahead instructions: Pie is best eaten the day of making it. You can make the pie dough in advance: make it up to 3 days ahead, wrap well and refrigerate. Or, wrap in plastic wrap and freeze it for up to 3 months. When ready to use, remove from the freezer and let it thaw in the refrigerator overnight or up to 24 hours.

Leftover / reheating instructions: Store leftovers at room temperature loosely covered with foil, plastic wrap, or with an overturned bowl. Reheat at 350 degrees for 15 minutes. 

  • Category: Pie
  • Method: Baked
  • Cuisine: American

Keywords: Vegan apple pie, Vegan apple pie recipe

A Couple Cooks - Healthy, Whole Food, & Vegetarian Recipes

Apple Turnovers

These easy apple turnovers are made with store-bought puff pastry or homemade pie crust. They’re filled with tart apples, currants, walnuts, sugar and cinnamon. All the best fall flavors in a hand-held pie! Continue reading “Apple Turnovers…

These easy apple turnovers are made with store-bought puff pastry or homemade pie crust. They're filled with tart apples, currants, walnuts, sugar and cinnamon. All the best fall flavors in a hand-held pie!

Continue reading "Apple Turnovers" »

The Kimchi-Cheddar Croissant I Can’t Stop Dreaming About

It’s 9:45 on a Saturday morning. While the rest of Dublin is still asleep or comfy in their homes, a line twenty-strong hugs the plaster siding of the Fumbally Stables market, waiting until the doors open at 10. Behind me in line, two young girls who c…

It’s 9:45 on a Saturday morning. While the rest of Dublin is still asleep or comfy in their homes, a line twenty-strong hugs the plaster siding of the Fumbally Stables market, waiting until the doors open at 10. Behind me in line, two young girls who can't be older than ten poke each other, while an older girl with them talks on the phone. The heavy, salty air whispers of impending rain and I grimace at the clouds gathering overhead.

Finally, the doors to the market open and the line surges forward. While the weekly market features seasonal vegetables, a cult-favorite Irish sauce brand, and more, we all risk the rain for the pastries from Scéal Bakery.

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Apple Cinnamon Rolls with Jack Daniels-Cream Cheese Icing

From the archives It’s September! The 9th month of the year is the gateway to sweatshirts, chili, football, and all things pumpkin. But before there’s pumpkin and Halloween candy, there are apples. This month, Rachel is throwing an Apple a Day party – a group of fabulous bloggers sharing their favorite apple recipes. And my […]

Apple Cinnamon Rolls with Jack Daniels Cream Cheese Frosting

From the archives

It’s September! The 9th month of the year is the gateway to sweatshirts, chili, football, and all things pumpkin. But before there’s pumpkin and Halloween candy, there are apples.

This month, Rachel is throwing an Apple a Day party – a group of fabulous bloggers sharing their favorite apple recipes. And my contribution? Breakfast. But not just any breakfast. It’s cinnamon roll meets apple pie meets Jack Daniels.

The cinnamon rolls are dressed up for fall with vanilla bean, brown sugar, apples, and whiskey and then topped with a cream cheese glaze scented with just a little bit more whiskey. It will take you longer to read the recipe title aloud than it will to inhale a cinnamon roll and lick your fingers clean. I speak from experience.

Apple Cinnamon Rolls with Jack Daniels-Cream Cheese Icing

Happy September! And seriously. Make those cinnamon rolls this weekend.

Apple Cinnamon Rolls with Jack Daniels Cream Cheese Icing

Celebrate fall with cinnamon rolls filled with apples, brown sugar, and whiskey.

Ingredients

  • For the Dough:
  • 4 large egg yolks
  • 1 large whole egg
  • 1/4 cup sugar
  • 2 tsp vanilla bean paste or extract (or the scrapings from 1 vanilla pod)
  • 6 Tbsp unsalted butter, melted
  • 3/4 cup buttermilk
  • 4 cups flour (20 oz), plus more for dusting surface
  • 1 pkg (2 1/4 tsp) instant yeast
  • 1 tsp salt
  • Vegetable oil or cooking spray
  • For the Filling:
  • 4 Tbsp butter
  • 2 apples (I used Braeburn), peeled and diced into 1/4-inch cubes
  • 1 cup packed dark brown sugar, divided
  • 1 Tbsp ground cinnamon
  • 2 Tbsp Jack Daniels (optional but highly recommended; can omit)
  • 1 tsp vanilla
  • Pinch salt
  • For the Icing:
  • 2.5 oz cream cheese, softened
  • 2 Tbsp milk
  • 2-3 tsp Jack Daniels (optional; can replace with milk)
  • 1 cup powdered sugar

Instructions

  1. Make the dough: In the bowl of a stand mixer fitted with the dough hook, beat the egg yolks, whole egg, sugar, butter, vanilla, buttermilk and half the flour together until well combined. Add yeast, salt, and the next 1 1/4 cup flour (leaving about 3/4 cup remaining) and knead on low for 5 minutes.
  2. Add additional flour by the spoonful if necessary - you want the dough soft and moist but not overly sticky. Knead another 5 minutes until the dough clears the sides of the bowl (but might still stick to the bottom a bit).
  3. Transfer dough to a lightly greased, large bowl and let double, 2-2.5 hours.
  4. Just before the dough is finished, make the filling. Melt the butter in a large saute pan and add the diced apple. Crumble 1/2 cup of brown sugar over top and stir in the cinnamon, a pinch of salt, and Jack Daniels. Simmer for 10 minutes, until thick and bubbly. Remove from heat, stir in vanilla, and set aside to cool.
  5. Spray or butter a 9-inch pan. Turn out the dough onto your lightly floured work surface. Stretch and roll the dough into a ~12x18 rectangle with the long edge nearest to you.
  6. Sprinkle the remaining 1/2 cup brown sugar over the dough, leaving the top 1-inch bare. Spread the cooled apple mixture over the dough.
  7. Starting with the edge of the dough closest to you, roll the dough into a cylinder and pinch the the seam to seal. Gently press, squeeze, and stretch the roll to get an even thickness.
  8. Cut the roll into 1 1/2-inch slices and place in the baking dish (you'll get 12 rolls). Cover tightly with foil or plastic wrap and refrigerate overnight.
  9. Place the rolls in the oven with the heat off. Fill a shallow pan 2/3 full of boiling water and place it on the rack below the rolls. Close the oven and let the rolls rise for ~30 minutes.
  10. Remove the water pan and rolls from the oven and preheat the oven to 350.
  11. Bake rolls on the middle rack for 25-30 minutes, until golden brown.
  12. While the rolls are cooling, beat the cream cheese, milk, Jack Daniels (to taste, 1-2 tsp at a time), and powdered sugar together until smooth. Drizzle over the rolls and serve.
  13. Leftovers can be stored in the fridge, tightly covered. Rewarm in the microwave for best results.

Notes

Yields: 12 rolls

Adapted from Overnight Cinnamon Rolls

Tahini Caramel Apple Tart

I’ve been thinking about this French Apple Tart ever since I saw Ina make it – I’m usually not a tart kind of person because lining a pastry tin is not my idea of fun, but this recipe is SO simple, there’s no faffing around. You roll out a flaky pastry into a rectangle, top with sliced apples and sugar and bake. Now, Ina brushes the apples with an apricot jam glaze (a trick my mum always uses too) but I opted for a tahini caramel sauce instead – drizzled over the tart whilst still warm. It’s a little bit nutty and isn’t too sweet but if you’re daunted by caramel making you can always stick with the jam if you want!    

The post Tahini Caramel Apple Tart appeared first on Izy Hossack – Top With Cinnamon.

slices of tahini caramel apple tart

I’ve been thinking about this French Apple Tart ever since I saw Ina make it – I’m usually not a tart kind of person because lining a pastry tin is not my idea of fun, but this recipe is SO simple, there’s no faffing around.

You roll out a flaky pastry into a rectangle, top with sliced apples and sugar and bake. Now, Ina brushes the apples with an apricot jam glaze (a trick my mum always uses too) but I opted for a tahini caramel sauce instead – drizzled over the tart whilst still warm.

A sliced apple tart drizzled with tahini caramel

It’s a little bit nutty and isn’t too sweet but if you’re daunted by caramel making you can always stick with the jam if you want!

 

 

slices of tahini caramel apple tart

Tahini Caramel Apple Tart

Yield: serves 8-12
Prep Time: 20 minutes
Cook Time: 45 minutes
Additional Time: 1 hour
Total Time: 2 hours 5 minutes

An easy tahini caramel sauce drizzled over a simple apple tart with homemade flaky pastry!

Recipe adapted from Ina Garten

Ingredients

For the pastry:

  • 2 cups (240g) plain white (all-purpose) flour
  • 1 tbsp granulated sugar
  • ½ tsp salt
  • ¾ cup (165g) unsalted butter, cold, cubed
  • up to 1/2 cup (125ml) ice water

For the caramel:

  • 1/3 cup (65g) granulated sugar
  • 2 tbsp water
  • 2 tbsp (30g) unstalted butter
  • generous pinch salt
  • ½ tsp vanilla extract or vanilla bean powder
  • 3 tbsp tahini
  • 4 tbsp milk

For the top:

  • 3 to 4 Bramley apples, peeled and cored
  • ¼ cup (50g) granulated sugar
  • 2 tbsp unsalted butter, cut into little cubes

Instructions

Make the pastry:

  1. Place the flour, salt, sugar and butter into the bowl of a food processor. Pulse to cut the butter in – you want a mealy mixture with a few pea-sized lumps of butter remaining. Drizzle in the water (start with 4 tablespoons) and pulse in, adding more water a tablespoon at a time if needed. The mixture should be moist enough so that if you squeeze some together, it’ll stick.
  2. Tip the pastry mixture out onto a piece of cling film. Pat together with your hands into a rectangle then wrap and refrigerate for 1 hour.

Meanwhile make the caramel:

  1. Place the sugar and water in a large saucepan (silver/white ones a best so you can see the colour change). Place over a medium heat on the stove and stir just until the sugar dissolves then stop stirring. Let the mixture cook, tilting and swirling the pan, until it has reached an even, golden colour.
  2. Turn the heat all the way down, add in the butter, salt and vanilla. Let that butter melt a bit before picking the spoon back up and mixing it in. Once smooth, add the tahini and milk and stir through until smooth. Take off the heat and set aside.

Rolling and baking:

  1. Once the pastry has rested, preheat the oven to 200°C (400°F) fan.
  2. Cut the apples in half and then slice into half-moons about ¼-inch (5mm) thick.
  3. Cut a piece of baking paper to fit a large baking tray. Unwrap the pastry, place onto the baking paper and dust with flour. Roll the pastry out into a rectangle slightly smaller than the piece of baking paper. Trim the edges so they are straight then transfer the pastry (on the baking paper) onto the baking tray.
  4. Place overlapping slices of apples diagonally down the middle of the tart and continue making diagonal rows on both sides of the first row until the pastry is covered with apple slices. Sprinkle with the 1/4 cup of sugar and dot with the butter.
  5. Bake for 35-45 minutes until the tart is dark golden around the edges and the apples have coloured slightly. Drizzle with the caramel (you may need to re-warm it over a low heat on the stove to get it drizzle-able again) then allow to cool before slicing and serving.

Notes

  • if you want to speed this recipe up, you can use a block of puff pastry or shortcrust pastry in place of making your own. 

Have you made this recipe?
I’d love to see how it went! Tag me on instagram @izyhossack and hashtag it #topwithcinnamon so I can have a look & reshare in my stories!

The post Tahini Caramel Apple Tart appeared first on Izy Hossack - Top With Cinnamon.

Treacle Tart

Thanks to Lyle’s Golden Syrup for sponsoring this post Amongst all the daily changes that have happened from the lockdown, cooking and baking remains something regular for me to enjoy! And even though there are still some issues with sourcing ingredients like eggs and flour, it’s a way to think creatively and make something comforting and delicious. A treacle tart is a British classic of shortcrust pastry filled with a mixture of breadcrumbs and, most importantly, Lyle’s Golden Syrup which gives the tart that signature caramelised flavour (without even having to make caramel!). It’s a comforting flavour and in these times, that nostalgic comfort of foods from childhood is something I’m craving more and more. Lyle’s Golden Syruphas created a special VE day-themed golden syrup tin which is on sale at the moment. Aiming to raise over £25,000, they’ll be donating 5p from every tin sold to the ‘Help for Heroes’ charity which supports those who have been injured in the Armed Forces. I’m sure with the current situation, this help will be all the more needed by those people. Usually the filling is set with an egg but since they’re a bit hard to come by at the mo, […]

The post Treacle Tart appeared first on Izy Hossack – Top With Cinnamon.

Thanks to Lyle’s Golden Syrup for sponsoring this post

a treacle tart topped with berries in the shape of the union jack

Amongst all the daily changes that have happened from the lockdown, cooking and baking remains something regular for me to enjoy! And even though there are still some issues with sourcing ingredients like eggs and flour, it’s a way to think creatively and make something comforting and delicious.

A treacle tart is a British classic of shortcrust pastry filled with a mixture of breadcrumbs and, most importantly, Lyle’s Golden Syrup which gives the tart that signature caramelised flavour (without even having to make caramel!). It’s a comforting flavour and in these times, that nostalgic comfort of foods from childhood is something I’m craving more and more.

a slice of treacle tart topped with berries

Lyle’s Golden Syruphas created a special VE day-themed golden syrup tin which is on sale at the moment. Aiming to raise over £25,000, they’ll be donating 5p from every tin sold to the ‘Help for Heroes’ charity which supports those who have been injured in the Armed Forces. I’m sure with the current situation, this help will be all the more needed by those people.

Treacle tart closeup

Usually the filling is set with an egg but since they’re a bit hard to come by at the mo, I’ve adapted the recipe from my vegan pecan pie which is set with a mixture of oat milk & cornflour, enriched with butter. If you can’t get flour, you can always buy a pre-made shortcrust pastry from the supermarket! Also, as the filling uses up breadcrumbs, it’s a great way to put to use all those bits of stale bread you probably have from baking your lockdown sourdough bread!!

Treacle Tart (with fresh berry topping)

Treacle Tart (with fresh berry topping)

Yield: serves 8-12
Prep Time: 30 minutes
Cook Time: 50 minutes
Additional Time: 1 hour
Total Time: 2 hours 20 minutes

Ingredients

Pastry:

  • 150g plain white flour
  • 75g unsalted butter (or vegan block butter), cold, cubed
  • 20g icing sugar
  • 1/4 tsp salt
  • 2-3 tbsp milk or oat milk, cold

Filling:

  • 300g Lyle’s Golden Syrup
  • 55g butter or vegan butter
  • 120g milk or oat milk
  • 1/4 tsp salt
  • 1 tsp lemon juice
  • 1 tbsp cornflour
  • 60g dried, fine breadcrumbs (I used sourdough ones)

Instructions

For the pastry:

  1. Combine all the pastry ingredients, in a food processor. Blitz to combine until you get a mealy, breadcrumb-like texture. Add the milk, starting with 2 tbsp, and pulse to combine. When you pinch some of the mixture together it should stick, forming a ball. If not, add the remaining 1 tbsp of milk and pulse that in.
  2. Tip the contents of the food processor out onto a clean work surface and bring it all together with your hands into a ball. Flatten into a disk and place into a resealable bag, in the fridge, to chill for at least 1 hour.

For the filling:

  1. Combine the golden syrup, butter, milk and salt in a small pot. Heat on a low heat until the butter has melted. Keep cooking until the mixture starts to gently bubble then remove from the heat. Stir in the lemon juice, cornflour and dried breadcrumbs. Set aside.

Line the tin:

  1. You’ll need a shallow 8 or 9-inch flan tin (tart tin) or, if you want a rectangular tart like I have here, use a 7 x 9.5-inch roasting dish.
  2. Dust your work surface with some flour, remove the chilled pastry from the resealable bag and place onto the flour. Dust with some extra flour on top. Gently roll the pastry out into either a circle or rectangle, depending on the tin you’re using, which is around 1-inch wider all the way around than your chosen tin.
  3. Lift the pastry up and drape over the tin, lifting the edges and gently lowering them onto the tin. Press firmly into the corners and edges then trim away any excess pastry. Prick the base all over with a fork.
  4. Place the lined tin into the freezer (or fridge if you don’t have enough space) for 10 minutes as you preheat the oven to 160°C fan (325°F) or 180°C non-fan (350°F).

Blind bake the pastry:

  1. Once preheated, line the pastry with a layer of baking paper, fill with baking beans (or rice/pie weights) and bake for 15 minutes.
  2. Remove the baking paper and bake for a further 5-10 minutes until the pastry looks dry and cooked through.

Fill and do the final bake:

  1. Give the filling a stir and then pour it into the pastry case. Return to the oven for a further 20-25 minutes until the filling is set where it barely wobbles when the tin is shaken.
  2. Remove from the oven and allow to cool.
  3. Decorate with fresh berries, if desired, just before serving.

Notes

Vegan option: use vegan block 'butter' in the pastry and filling.

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3 Riffable Baking Recipes From Cult-Favorite Baker Dominique Ansel

For many, Dominique Ansel and the Cronut™ are synonymous. Since its birth in 2013, thousands (if not tens, hundreds) have lined up outside Ansel’s eponymous bakery in SoHo to try the confection, a feat of pastry engineering: a cream-filled, fried ring …

For many, Dominique Ansel and the Cronut™ are synonymous. Since its birth in 2013, thousands (if not tens, hundreds) have lined up outside Ansel’s eponymous bakery in SoHo to try the confection, a feat of pastry engineering: a cream-filled, fried ring of croissant-ish dough.

Restaurant critic Tejal Rao deemed the creation a “masterpiece," Time Magazine called it one of 2013’s best inventions, and the United States Patent and Trademark Office dubbed it an idea worth trademarking. Its popularity even spurred the release of a cookbook, Dominique Ansel: The Secret Recipes, in which there is the secret recipe (it takes three days from start to finish).

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