Apple Turnovers

These easy apple turnovers are made with store-bought puff pastry or homemade pie crust. They’re filled with tart apples, currants, walnuts, sugar and cinnamon. All the best fall flavors in a hand-held pie! Continue reading “Apple Turnovers…

These easy apple turnovers are made with store-bought puff pastry or homemade pie crust. They're filled with tart apples, currants, walnuts, sugar and cinnamon. All the best fall flavors in a hand-held pie!

Continue reading "Apple Turnovers" »

The Kimchi-Cheddar Croissant I Can’t Stop Dreaming About

It’s 9:45 on a Saturday morning. While the rest of Dublin is still asleep or comfy in their homes, a line twenty-strong hugs the plaster siding of the Fumbally Stables market, waiting until the doors open at 10. Behind me in line, two young girls who c…

It’s 9:45 on a Saturday morning. While the rest of Dublin is still asleep or comfy in their homes, a line twenty-strong hugs the plaster siding of the Fumbally Stables market, waiting until the doors open at 10. Behind me in line, two young girls who can't be older than ten poke each other, while an older girl with them talks on the phone. The heavy, salty air whispers of impending rain and I grimace at the clouds gathering overhead.

Finally, the doors to the market open and the line surges forward. While the weekly market features seasonal vegetables, a cult-favorite Irish sauce brand, and more, we all risk the rain for the pastries from Scéal Bakery.

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Apple Cinnamon Rolls with Jack Daniels-Cream Cheese Icing

From the archives It’s September! The 9th month of the year is the gateway to sweatshirts, chili, football, and all things pumpkin. But before there’s pumpkin and Halloween candy, there are apples. This month, Rachel is throwing an Apple a Day party – a group of fabulous bloggers sharing their favorite apple recipes. And my […]

Apple Cinnamon Rolls with Jack Daniels Cream Cheese Frosting

From the archives

It’s September! The 9th month of the year is the gateway to sweatshirts, chili, football, and all things pumpkin. But before there’s pumpkin and Halloween candy, there are apples.

This month, Rachel is throwing an Apple a Day party – a group of fabulous bloggers sharing their favorite apple recipes. And my contribution? Breakfast. But not just any breakfast. It’s cinnamon roll meets apple pie meets Jack Daniels.

The cinnamon rolls are dressed up for fall with vanilla bean, brown sugar, apples, and whiskey and then topped with a cream cheese glaze scented with just a little bit more whiskey. It will take you longer to read the recipe title aloud than it will to inhale a cinnamon roll and lick your fingers clean. I speak from experience.

Apple Cinnamon Rolls with Jack Daniels-Cream Cheese Icing

Happy September! And seriously. Make those cinnamon rolls this weekend.

Apple Cinnamon Rolls with Jack Daniels Cream Cheese Icing

Celebrate fall with cinnamon rolls filled with apples, brown sugar, and whiskey.

Ingredients

  • For the Dough:
  • 4 large egg yolks
  • 1 large whole egg
  • 1/4 cup sugar
  • 2 tsp vanilla bean paste or extract (or the scrapings from 1 vanilla pod)
  • 6 Tbsp unsalted butter, melted
  • 3/4 cup buttermilk
  • 4 cups flour (20 oz), plus more for dusting surface
  • 1 pkg (2 1/4 tsp) instant yeast
  • 1 tsp salt
  • Vegetable oil or cooking spray
  • For the Filling:
  • 4 Tbsp butter
  • 2 apples (I used Braeburn), peeled and diced into 1/4-inch cubes
  • 1 cup packed dark brown sugar, divided
  • 1 Tbsp ground cinnamon
  • 2 Tbsp Jack Daniels (optional but highly recommended; can omit)
  • 1 tsp vanilla
  • Pinch salt
  • For the Icing:
  • 2.5 oz cream cheese, softened
  • 2 Tbsp milk
  • 2-3 tsp Jack Daniels (optional; can replace with milk)
  • 1 cup powdered sugar

Instructions

  1. Make the dough: In the bowl of a stand mixer fitted with the dough hook, beat the egg yolks, whole egg, sugar, butter, vanilla, buttermilk and half the flour together until well combined. Add yeast, salt, and the next 1 1/4 cup flour (leaving about 3/4 cup remaining) and knead on low for 5 minutes.
  2. Add additional flour by the spoonful if necessary - you want the dough soft and moist but not overly sticky. Knead another 5 minutes until the dough clears the sides of the bowl (but might still stick to the bottom a bit).
  3. Transfer dough to a lightly greased, large bowl and let double, 2-2.5 hours.
  4. Just before the dough is finished, make the filling. Melt the butter in a large saute pan and add the diced apple. Crumble 1/2 cup of brown sugar over top and stir in the cinnamon, a pinch of salt, and Jack Daniels. Simmer for 10 minutes, until thick and bubbly. Remove from heat, stir in vanilla, and set aside to cool.
  5. Spray or butter a 9-inch pan. Turn out the dough onto your lightly floured work surface. Stretch and roll the dough into a ~12x18 rectangle with the long edge nearest to you.
  6. Sprinkle the remaining 1/2 cup brown sugar over the dough, leaving the top 1-inch bare. Spread the cooled apple mixture over the dough.
  7. Starting with the edge of the dough closest to you, roll the dough into a cylinder and pinch the the seam to seal. Gently press, squeeze, and stretch the roll to get an even thickness.
  8. Cut the roll into 1 1/2-inch slices and place in the baking dish (you'll get 12 rolls). Cover tightly with foil or plastic wrap and refrigerate overnight.
  9. Place the rolls in the oven with the heat off. Fill a shallow pan 2/3 full of boiling water and place it on the rack below the rolls. Close the oven and let the rolls rise for ~30 minutes.
  10. Remove the water pan and rolls from the oven and preheat the oven to 350.
  11. Bake rolls on the middle rack for 25-30 minutes, until golden brown.
  12. While the rolls are cooling, beat the cream cheese, milk, Jack Daniels (to taste, 1-2 tsp at a time), and powdered sugar together until smooth. Drizzle over the rolls and serve.
  13. Leftovers can be stored in the fridge, tightly covered. Rewarm in the microwave for best results.

Notes

Yields: 12 rolls

Adapted from Overnight Cinnamon Rolls

Tahini Caramel Apple Tart

I’ve been thinking about this French Apple Tart ever since I saw Ina make it – I’m usually not a tart kind of person because lining a pastry tin is not my idea of fun, but this recipe is SO simple, there’s no faffing around. You roll out a flaky pastry into a rectangle, top with sliced apples and sugar and bake. Now, Ina brushes the apples with an apricot jam glaze (a trick my mum always uses too) but I opted for a tahini caramel sauce instead – drizzled over the tart whilst still warm. It’s a little bit nutty and isn’t too sweet but if you’re daunted by caramel making you can always stick with the jam if you want!    

The post Tahini Caramel Apple Tart appeared first on Izy Hossack – Top With Cinnamon.

slices of tahini caramel apple tart

I’ve been thinking about this French Apple Tart ever since I saw Ina make it – I’m usually not a tart kind of person because lining a pastry tin is not my idea of fun, but this recipe is SO simple, there’s no faffing around.

You roll out a flaky pastry into a rectangle, top with sliced apples and sugar and bake. Now, Ina brushes the apples with an apricot jam glaze (a trick my mum always uses too) but I opted for a tahini caramel sauce instead – drizzled over the tart whilst still warm.

A sliced apple tart drizzled with tahini caramel

It’s a little bit nutty and isn’t too sweet but if you’re daunted by caramel making you can always stick with the jam if you want!

 

 

slices of tahini caramel apple tart

Tahini Caramel Apple Tart

Yield: serves 8-12
Prep Time: 20 minutes
Cook Time: 45 minutes
Additional Time: 1 hour
Total Time: 2 hours 5 minutes

An easy tahini caramel sauce drizzled over a simple apple tart with homemade flaky pastry!

Recipe adapted from Ina Garten

Ingredients

For the pastry:

  • 2 cups (240g) plain white (all-purpose) flour
  • 1 tbsp granulated sugar
  • ½ tsp salt
  • ¾ cup (165g) unsalted butter, cold, cubed
  • up to 1/2 cup (125ml) ice water

For the caramel:

  • 1/3 cup (65g) granulated sugar
  • 2 tbsp water
  • 2 tbsp (30g) unstalted butter
  • generous pinch salt
  • ½ tsp vanilla extract or vanilla bean powder
  • 3 tbsp tahini
  • 4 tbsp milk

For the top:

  • 3 to 4 Bramley apples, peeled and cored
  • ¼ cup (50g) granulated sugar
  • 2 tbsp unsalted butter, cut into little cubes

Instructions

Make the pastry:

  1. Place the flour, salt, sugar and butter into the bowl of a food processor. Pulse to cut the butter in – you want a mealy mixture with a few pea-sized lumps of butter remaining. Drizzle in the water (start with 4 tablespoons) and pulse in, adding more water a tablespoon at a time if needed. The mixture should be moist enough so that if you squeeze some together, it’ll stick.
  2. Tip the pastry mixture out onto a piece of cling film. Pat together with your hands into a rectangle then wrap and refrigerate for 1 hour.

Meanwhile make the caramel:

  1. Place the sugar and water in a large saucepan (silver/white ones a best so you can see the colour change). Place over a medium heat on the stove and stir just until the sugar dissolves then stop stirring. Let the mixture cook, tilting and swirling the pan, until it has reached an even, golden colour.
  2. Turn the heat all the way down, add in the butter, salt and vanilla. Let that butter melt a bit before picking the spoon back up and mixing it in. Once smooth, add the tahini and milk and stir through until smooth. Take off the heat and set aside.

Rolling and baking:

  1. Once the pastry has rested, preheat the oven to 200°C (400°F) fan.
  2. Cut the apples in half and then slice into half-moons about ¼-inch (5mm) thick.
  3. Cut a piece of baking paper to fit a large baking tray. Unwrap the pastry, place onto the baking paper and dust with flour. Roll the pastry out into a rectangle slightly smaller than the piece of baking paper. Trim the edges so they are straight then transfer the pastry (on the baking paper) onto the baking tray.
  4. Place overlapping slices of apples diagonally down the middle of the tart and continue making diagonal rows on both sides of the first row until the pastry is covered with apple slices. Sprinkle with the 1/4 cup of sugar and dot with the butter.
  5. Bake for 35-45 minutes until the tart is dark golden around the edges and the apples have coloured slightly. Drizzle with the caramel (you may need to re-warm it over a low heat on the stove to get it drizzle-able again) then allow to cool before slicing and serving.

Notes

  • if you want to speed this recipe up, you can use a block of puff pastry or shortcrust pastry in place of making your own. 

Have you made this recipe?
I’d love to see how it went! Tag me on instagram @izyhossack and hashtag it #topwithcinnamon so I can have a look & reshare in my stories!

The post Tahini Caramel Apple Tart appeared first on Izy Hossack - Top With Cinnamon.

Treacle Tart

Thanks to Lyle’s Golden Syrup for sponsoring this post Amongst all the daily changes that have happened from the lockdown, cooking and baking remains something regular for me to enjoy! And even though there are still some issues with sourcing ingredients like eggs and flour, it’s a way to think creatively and make something comforting and delicious. A treacle tart is a British classic of shortcrust pastry filled with a mixture of breadcrumbs and, most importantly, Lyle’s Golden Syrup which gives the tart that signature caramelised flavour (without even having to make caramel!). It’s a comforting flavour and in these times, that nostalgic comfort of foods from childhood is something I’m craving more and more. Lyle’s Golden Syruphas created a special VE day-themed golden syrup tin which is on sale at the moment. Aiming to raise over £25,000, they’ll be donating 5p from every tin sold to the ‘Help for Heroes’ charity which supports those who have been injured in the Armed Forces. I’m sure with the current situation, this help will be all the more needed by those people. Usually the filling is set with an egg but since they’re a bit hard to come by at the mo, […]

The post Treacle Tart appeared first on Izy Hossack – Top With Cinnamon.

Thanks to Lyle’s Golden Syrup for sponsoring this post

a treacle tart topped with berries in the shape of the union jack

Amongst all the daily changes that have happened from the lockdown, cooking and baking remains something regular for me to enjoy! And even though there are still some issues with sourcing ingredients like eggs and flour, it’s a way to think creatively and make something comforting and delicious.

A treacle tart is a British classic of shortcrust pastry filled with a mixture of breadcrumbs and, most importantly, Lyle’s Golden Syrup which gives the tart that signature caramelised flavour (without even having to make caramel!). It’s a comforting flavour and in these times, that nostalgic comfort of foods from childhood is something I’m craving more and more.

a slice of treacle tart topped with berries

Lyle’s Golden Syruphas created a special VE day-themed golden syrup tin which is on sale at the moment. Aiming to raise over £25,000, they’ll be donating 5p from every tin sold to the ‘Help for Heroes’ charity which supports those who have been injured in the Armed Forces. I’m sure with the current situation, this help will be all the more needed by those people.

Treacle tart closeup

Usually the filling is set with an egg but since they’re a bit hard to come by at the mo, I’ve adapted the recipe from my vegan pecan pie which is set with a mixture of oat milk & cornflour, enriched with butter. If you can’t get flour, you can always buy a pre-made shortcrust pastry from the supermarket! Also, as the filling uses up breadcrumbs, it’s a great way to put to use all those bits of stale bread you probably have from baking your lockdown sourdough bread!!

Treacle Tart (with fresh berry topping)

Treacle Tart (with fresh berry topping)

Yield: serves 8-12
Prep Time: 30 minutes
Cook Time: 50 minutes
Additional Time: 1 hour
Total Time: 2 hours 20 minutes

Ingredients

Pastry:

  • 150g plain white flour
  • 75g unsalted butter (or vegan block butter), cold, cubed
  • 20g icing sugar
  • 1/4 tsp salt
  • 2-3 tbsp milk or oat milk, cold

Filling:

  • 300g Lyle’s Golden Syrup
  • 55g butter or vegan butter
  • 120g milk or oat milk
  • 1/4 tsp salt
  • 1 tsp lemon juice
  • 1 tbsp cornflour
  • 60g dried, fine breadcrumbs (I used sourdough ones)

Instructions

For the pastry:

  1. Combine all the pastry ingredients, in a food processor. Blitz to combine until you get a mealy, breadcrumb-like texture. Add the milk, starting with 2 tbsp, and pulse to combine. When you pinch some of the mixture together it should stick, forming a ball. If not, add the remaining 1 tbsp of milk and pulse that in.
  2. Tip the contents of the food processor out onto a clean work surface and bring it all together with your hands into a ball. Flatten into a disk and place into a resealable bag, in the fridge, to chill for at least 1 hour.

For the filling:

  1. Combine the golden syrup, butter, milk and salt in a small pot. Heat on a low heat until the butter has melted. Keep cooking until the mixture starts to gently bubble then remove from the heat. Stir in the lemon juice, cornflour and dried breadcrumbs. Set aside.

Line the tin:

  1. You’ll need a shallow 8 or 9-inch flan tin (tart tin) or, if you want a rectangular tart like I have here, use a 7 x 9.5-inch roasting dish.
  2. Dust your work surface with some flour, remove the chilled pastry from the resealable bag and place onto the flour. Dust with some extra flour on top. Gently roll the pastry out into either a circle or rectangle, depending on the tin you’re using, which is around 1-inch wider all the way around than your chosen tin.
  3. Lift the pastry up and drape over the tin, lifting the edges and gently lowering them onto the tin. Press firmly into the corners and edges then trim away any excess pastry. Prick the base all over with a fork.
  4. Place the lined tin into the freezer (or fridge if you don’t have enough space) for 10 minutes as you preheat the oven to 160°C fan (325°F) or 180°C non-fan (350°F).

Blind bake the pastry:

  1. Once preheated, line the pastry with a layer of baking paper, fill with baking beans (or rice/pie weights) and bake for 15 minutes.
  2. Remove the baking paper and bake for a further 5-10 minutes until the pastry looks dry and cooked through.

Fill and do the final bake:

  1. Give the filling a stir and then pour it into the pastry case. Return to the oven for a further 20-25 minutes until the filling is set where it barely wobbles when the tin is shaken.
  2. Remove from the oven and allow to cool.
  3. Decorate with fresh berries, if desired, just before serving.

Notes

Vegan option: use vegan block 'butter' in the pastry and filling.

The post Treacle Tart appeared first on Izy Hossack - Top With Cinnamon.

3 Riffable Baking Recipes From Cult-Favorite Baker Dominique Ansel

For many, Dominique Ansel and the Cronut™ are synonymous. Since its birth in 2013, thousands (if not tens, hundreds) have lined up outside Ansel’s eponymous bakery in SoHo to try the confection, a feat of pastry engineering: a cream-filled, fried ring …

For many, Dominique Ansel and the Cronut™ are synonymous. Since its birth in 2013, thousands (if not tens, hundreds) have lined up outside Ansel’s eponymous bakery in SoHo to try the confection, a feat of pastry engineering: a cream-filled, fried ring of croissant-ish dough.

Restaurant critic Tejal Rao deemed the creation a “masterpiece," Time Magazine called it one of 2013’s best inventions, and the United States Patent and Trademark Office dubbed it an idea worth trademarking. Its popularity even spurred the release of a cookbook, Dominique Ansel: The Secret Recipes, in which there is the secret recipe (it takes three days from start to finish).

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How to Make Puff Pastry, According to the Fearless Baker

I’ve always had a thing for dough. Bread dough, pie dough, biscuit dough…I love diving into a big bowl of ingredients and coming out of it with floury hands and something delicious to show for my efforts. This is why, despite being one of the m…

I’ve always had a thing for dough. Bread dough, pie dough, biscuit dough...I love diving into a big bowl of ingredients and coming out of it with floury hands and something delicious to show for my efforts. This is why, despite being one of the more complicated recipes on my long list of doughy loves, I adore making puff pastry. 

Puff pastry is made using a method known as lamination, where a block of butter is wrapped fully and sealed inside a dough. The dough then goes through a series of folds, where it is rolled out to a certain thickness and folded over onto itself. The first fold creates a series of layers (thin, alternating layers of dough and butter). The subsequent folds increase these layers, ultimately creating a versatile dough that can be used to make a huge variety of impressive desserts. (The dough for puff pastry can also be yeasted, which is then used to make things like croissants and Danish, and while the method is similar, this article focuses on a non-yeasted puff.) When the dough hits the heat of the oven, the moisture inside the thin layers of butter evaporate, creating steam, which creates the crisp, insanely flaky dough that is puff pastry. 

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Simple Rhubarb Tart

Every time rhubarb season rolls around, I’m IN on it, buying it as often as I can make an excuse to! This recipe is for a super simple rhubarb tart, which really lets the flavour shine. It’s possibly the simplest a rhubarb tart can get, with only 5 ingredients needed to bake up the prettiest dessert! For a few months at the end of 2018, I had the luck to assist Frankie Unsworth, an amazing food stylist who just is the loveliest, happiest person! Her book had just come out that summer too which is centred around delicious recipes with specific styling tips for each and every one. There are also notes on helpful tools to buy and sneaky methods to use to make food look its best. After reading the whole book last year, the 5-ingredient rhubarb tart from was stuck in my mind and, once the rhubarb started to appear in the market, it was destiny that I would make it. I made my life a bit more complicated by making my own rough puff pastry for the tart (see here for my tutorial on how to make some yourself!). But if you stick to using shop bought […]

The post Simple Rhubarb Tart appeared first on Izy Hossack – Top With Cinnamon.

Simple Rhubarb Tart on a tray on the counter

Every time rhubarb season rolls around, I’m IN on it, buying it as often as I can make an excuse to! This recipe is for a super simple rhubarb tart, which really lets the flavour shine. It’s possibly the simplest a rhubarb tart can get, with only 5 ingredients needed to bake up the prettiest dessert!

Simple Rhubarb Tart with chopped pistachios by Izy Hossack

For a few months at the end of 2018, I had the luck to assist Frankie Unsworth, an amazing food stylist who just is the loveliest, happiest person! Her book had just come out that summer too which is centred around delicious recipes with specific styling tips for each and every one. There are also notes on helpful tools to buy and sneaky methods to use to make food look its best.

After reading the whole book last year, the 5-ingredient rhubarb tart from was stuck in my mind and, once the rhubarb started to appear in the market, it was destiny that I would make it.

Simple Rhubarb Tart with chopped pistachios

I made my life a bit more complicated by making my own rough puff pastry for the tart (see here for my tutorial on how to make some yourself!). But if you stick to using shop bought stuff (especially if you can get the all-butter puff), it’s going to be incredibly delicious too.

A simple frame of puff pastry is filled with sugar, pistachios and rhubarb before baking. It’s almost like a galette but more sophisticated thanks to the sharp, neat edges of the square pastry. As an optional extra, Frankie recommends brushing honey over the rhubarb to make it shiny! It’s a bit fiddly as you need to do some measuring to make it all fit together perfectly, but that really is the hardest part!

Other simple tarts:

Simple Rhubarb Tart

Simple Rhubarb Tart

Yield: a 25cm square tart, serves 6

Ingredients

  • 80 g (1/2 cup) shelled pistachios
  • 5 tbsp caster (superfine) sugar
  • 1 large egg
  • 300-400g (11-14 ounces) rhubarb (see notes)
  • 320 or 375g (11.5 or 13.5 ounces) ready-rolled puff pastry (see notes)

To serve:

  • 2 tbsp clear honey, warmed
  • 6 tbsp creme fraiche or ice cream

Instructions

  1. Preheat the oven to 200°C (180°C fan / 400°F). Line a large baking tray with baking parchment.
  2. Very finely chop the pistachios (or pulse in a food processor). Place in a small bowl with the sugar and mix well.
  3. In a separate small bowl, beat the egg until smooth.
  4. Trim the tough ends and leaves off of the rhubarb. Cut each stalk into 20cm (8-inch) lengths.
  5. Unroll the pastry and lay it out on a work surface. Trim to a 25cm (10-inch) square. Using the tip of a knife, make an incision all the way around the square about 2.5cm (1-inch) in from the outside edge. Do not cut all the way through. The rhubarb will sit within the resulting 'frame'. Transfer to a piece of baking parchment so you can move it around freely.
  6. Cut four 22.5 x 2.5cm (9 x 1 inch) strips out of the remaining pastry. Brush the scored pastry 'frame' with the beaten egg, then lay the strips of pastry over it. You don't want the strips to overlap so place each strip flush against the next and continue all the way around to make a frame. If at any point the pastry feels warm and is hard to work with, transfer to the fridge to chill for 10 minutes. Brush the strips with more egg wash.
  7. Prick the base all over with a fork then scatter three quarters of the pistachio mixture over it evenly.
  8. Transfer the pastry to a baking tray and bake for 15 minutes. Remove from the oven and arrange the rhubarb as tightly and neatly as possible in a row inside the frame.
  9. Scatter the remaining pistachio sugar haphazardly over the rhubarb and flick a little water over it. Bake for a further 15-20 minutes until the pastry is golden, the base is crisp, and the rhubarb tender.
  10. To serve, brush the rhubarb with a little warmed honey (if using) and cut into portions. Add a dollop of creme fraiche or ice cream.

Notes

  • From 'The New Art of Cooking' by Frankie Unsworth
  • You can make your own rough puff pastry using this recipe and use that instead of the ready-rolled puff pastry.
  • The amount of rhubarb needed is going to depend on how thick the stems are. Frankie recommends 5-7 sticks when using the thick stuff. I was using much thinner stems and needed 12 stems (which weighed around 300g).
  • This will be very easy to vegan-ise: use a ready made puff pastry that is vegan friendly (most of the ones in the supermarket are). Mix 2 tbsp non-dairy milk with 2 tbsp maple syrup and use that instead of the egg wash. Lastly, brush the rhubarb with maple syrup instead of honey and serve with non-dairy vanilla ice cream!

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Tourtiere

I’m not going to beat around the bush here: The new Joy of Cooking is huge. When I first heard about it, I wondered, “Do we need a new Joy of Cooking?” First published in 1931, the book went through several revisions over the years, to become what has the most enduring of all American cookbooks. Yet I wondered if the book would (or could)…

I’m not going to beat around the bush here: The new Joy of Cooking is huge. When I first heard about it, I wondered, “Do we need a new Joy of Cooking?” First published in 1931, the book went through several revisions over the years, to become what has the most enduring of all American cookbooks. Yet I wondered if the book would (or could) still be relevant, in the age of the internet, and as several other books had come along through the year, that could also be considered “encyclopedias” of cooking. I had some doubts.

Continue Reading Tourtiere...

How to Make Almond Paste From Scratch

It’s always more fun to DIY. We’re here to show you how to make small batches of great foods at home. Today: With Linda Xiao from The Tart Tart’s homemade almond paste, you can take your almond-based desserts and pastries to a whole new level.
Re…

It's always more fun to DIY. We're here to show you how to make small batches of great foods at home. Today: With Linda Xiao from The Tart Tart's homemade almond paste, you can take your almond-based desserts and pastries to a whole new level.

Read More >>