Dilly Beans

This dilly beans recipe is full of tangy flavor and a pop of dill! It’s quick and easy to whip…

A Couple Cooks – Recipes worth repeating.

This dilly beans recipe is full of tangy flavor and a pop of dill! It’s quick and easy to whip up a jar of pickled green beans.

Dilly Beans

Are you a pickle lover? Here’s a jar you’ll fall hard for: Dilly Beans! These slender, crunchy pickled green beans pack a vinegary, herbaceous punch. They’re irresistible to snack on out of the jar, and make the ideal condiment to a picnic lunch, pitch in or cheese plate. Guess what: this old fashioned recipe doesn’t even require any fancy canning equipment! All you need is 20 minutes, a jar and some beans to whip up this quick pickles recipe: and you’ll be glad you did.

Ingredients for dilly beans

Dilly beans are pickled green beans that are preserved with garlic and dill seed (or fresh dill), which infuse the flavor of a classic dill pickle. You can make dilly beans as a classic canning recipe or as quick pickles or refrigerator pickles, where the jar is stored in the refrigerator immediately after making them. Quick pickles don’t require any special canning equipment, so it’s our preferred method for homemade pickles. They last for 1 month in the refrigerator (but are not shelf stable). Here’s what you’ll need to make dilly beans:

  • 1 wide-mouth pint canning jar
  • Green beans: the thinner the better! Look for very thin beans or even French green beans
  • Garlic
  • Bay leaf
  • White vinegar
  • Sugar
  • Salt
  • Peppercorns
  • Dill seed: not dried dill weed! (see below)
  • Fresh dill: you can omit if desired, but we like using both fresh dill and dill seeds
Dilly Beans

Dill seed versus dill weed: what’s the difference?

The key to this dilly beans recipe? Dill seed. But don’t confuse this with the similar but also important dried dill weed! Use dill weed here and you won’t be able to detect a dill flavor at all. Here’s why:

  • Dill seeds are small, brown flat seeds of the dill plant that are used in canning. The seeds infuse a very strong dill flavor into preserved foods, but they’re not often used in cooking.
  • Dried dill weed is the dried green leaves and stems of the plant. This spice is often used in cooking (it’s what gives Ranch Dip it’s signature flavor). But if used in canning, it has a very mild flavor that doesn’t penetrate the jar.
Dilly beans

How to make dilly beans: basic steps

This dilly bean recipe takes just 20 minutes to assemble the jar. Once it’s done, refrigerate for 24 hours for the best flavor and texture. The hardest part of this recipe is the waiting! Here are the basic steps (or jump right to the recipe):

  • Trim the green beans: Trim the beans so they fit into a wide-mouth pint jar. Add the garlic cloves, bay leaf, and fresh dill.
  • Bring the brine ingredients to a boil: Place white vinegar, water, sugar, salt, peppercorns, and dill seed in a pot and bring to a boil (see the recipe below for the exact quantities).
  • Pour in the jar and wait until it cools (about 1 hour). 
  • Refrigerate 24 hours. This helps to infuse the flavor into the beans and soften their texture. Very thin or French green beans pickle the best because their flavor is tender and crunchy right away! Some types of very thick green beans can still taste slightly tough after 1 day: so you may want to wait 48 hours if your beans are very thick.

Want to make more than 1 pint? It’s easy to double or triple this recipe. Head to the recipe below and press the 2x or 3x buttons next to the word Ingredients.

Storage info

How long can you store dilly beans? Store homemade dilly beans refrigerated for up to 1 month. This type of pickles are not shelf stable, so don’t attempt to store them in your pantry. Keep them in the refrigerator and you can eat off of them for days.

Dilly beans

Ways to serve dilly beans

We love dilly beans best right out of the jar! There are loads of ways

More green beans recipes

Love green beans? Here are more great green beans recipes for using this tasty veggie:

This dilly beans recipe is…

Vegetarian, vegan, plant-based, dairy-free and gluten-free.

Print
Dilly Beans

Dilly Beans


  • Author: Sonja Overhiser
  • Prep Time: 20 minutes
  • Cook Time: 0 minutes
  • Total Time: 20 minutes
  • Yield: 1 pint

Description

This dilly beans recipe is full of tangy flavor and a pop of dill! It’s quick and easy to whip up a jar of pickled green beans.


Ingredients

  • 8 ounces green beans (thin or French beans are best)
  • 2 garlic cloves, sliced
  • 4 sprigs fresh dill*
  • ½ cup white vinegar
  • ½ cup water
  • ½ tablespoon granulated sugar
  • 2 teaspoons kosher salt
  • 1 tablespoon black peppercorns
  • ½ tablespoon dried dill seed* (not dried dill weed)

Instructions

  1. Wash a wide-mouth pint mason jar and and its lid in hot soapy water. Then rinse and let air dry.
  2. Trim the green beans so they fit in jar with about 1/2” of space remaining at the top.
  3. Add the green beans, garlic and dill sprigs into the jar, squeezing them in as tightly as possible.
  4. In a small saucepan, combine the white vinegar, water, sugar, kosher salt, peppercorns, and dried dill seed. Bring to a boil, stirring occasionally to dissolve the sugar and salt (this will take only a few minutes).
  5. Once boiling, pour the brine into the jar. Tap the jar on the counter to release any air bubbles. 
  6. Discard any remaining brine, or top off the jar with extra water if any green beans are exposed at the top.
  7. Screw on the lid tightly and allow to cool to room temperature (about 1 hour). Refrigerate 24 hours for best flavor. Keeps up to 1 month refrigerated (this recipe is not shelf stable).

Notes

*Dill seed are small, brown flat seeds of the dill plant that are used in canning. Don’t use dried dill weed, which is the dried green leaves of the plant. Here we used dill seed in combination with fresh dill; if you can’t find fresh dill you can omit it.

  • Category: Pickles
  • Method: Pickling
  • Cuisine: Pickles
  • Diet: Vegan

Keywords: Dilly beans, dilly beans recipe, dilly bean recipe

A Couple Cooks - Recipes worth repeating.

Our Best Potato Salad

Here’s how to make the best potato salad recipe! This American-style salad is creamy and classic: maybe even better than…

A Couple Cooks – Recipes worth repeating.

Here’s how to make the best potato salad recipe! This American-style salad is creamy and classic: maybe even better than Grandma’s.

Potato Salad

There are loads of ways to make a good potato salad: German or French, loaded with dill or tossed in a tangy vinaigrette. But the type that holds our hearts is the American classic: just like Grandma’s or the grocery store deli counter! Here’s our best potato salad made the American way: creamy, tangy and sweet, and loaded with crunchy onions and pickles. It’s that pale yellow color that betrays the combination of mustard and mayo, and is destined for stardom at your next cookout or picnic. Prepare yourself in advance for the question: Can you bring that potato salad again?

Ingredients for the best potato salad recipe

Here’s how to make potato salad: the American way! Gather up your bottles of mayo, mustard and pickle relish for this one. This retro-style festival of condiments really does make for the best pop of flavor. We’ve made some updates to the classic recipe, adding Greek yogurt to stand in for a little mayo and fresh dill for an herbaceous pop. Here’s what you’ll need for this recipe:

  • Yukon gold potatoes: the variety here is important! Also called gold potatoes, they have a lightly sweet flavor and keep their shape when boiled. Do not substitute red skinned or russet potatoes!
  • White wine vinegar
  • Celery stalks
  • Green onions
  • Red onion
  • Fresh dill
  • Sweet pickle relish (or dill pickles)
  • Mayonnaise
  • Greek yogurt or sour cream
  • Yellow mustard and Dijon mustard
  • Celery seed
Potato salad

How to make potato salad

The trickiest part of how to make potato salad? Boiling the potatoes! There are several variations on the best way to do so. Critics argue over whether to peel and chop before or after boiling. Here’s what we recommend:

  • Quarter the Yukon gold potatoes, then place in a pot of cold water. Leave the skins on: they’ll come off easily later.
  • Boil the potatoes 8 to 15 minutes, until fork tender. Drain and rinse them under cold water.
  • Pop off the skins with your fingers, then chop into smaller pieces. When they’re cool enough to touch, the skins come off easily after boiling. Another trick? Sprinkle them with vinegar and salt before mixing (read more below).
  • Mix the potatoes with the sauce and vegetables. Chop the veggies, mix the sauce, and add it all together. Go to the recipe below for quantities.
  • Chill 2 hours. This salad tastes great right away, but it’s best when it’s cold. If possible, refrigerate it for 2 hours before serving.

Tips and ingredient notes

The basic method is simple, but it does take a bit of time to prepare this potato salad. But don’t worry: it’s absolutely worth the effort in the end! Here are a few notes about the process:

  • Sprinkle the potatoes with vinegar and salt, and let stand for 5 minutes before dressing. This trick from Julia Child is also part of our French Potato Salad recipe. It infuses the potatoes with tangy flavor before dressing them, which amplifies the flavor of the dish.
  • Use sweet pickle relish for a classic flavor, or dill pickles for more savory notes. Sweet pickle relish adds just the right sweetness to the overall mixture. But chopped dill pickles work too: they intensify the savory notes.
  • Greek yogurt or sour cream pair perfectly with mayo. Many salads use only mayo in the dressing. Adding Greek yogurt or sour cream in combination with it lightens the flavor. Greek yogurt also makes less calories and adds a slight tang.
  • Dijon mustard adds complexity. Yellow mustard is key to this classic recipe, but we love it with a little Dijon mustard in combination. We regularly stock both in our fridge. If you don’t, using 100% yellow mustard works too.
Potato salad

Storage info

This recipe just gets better over time! You can make a batch and store it in the refrigerator for days. Here are best practices when it comes to storage:

  • How long does potato salad last refrigerated? Up to 5 days. The flavor gets even better over time.
  • How long does potato salad last outside? Up to 1 hour. If serving outdoors, you can leave it unrefrigerated up to 1 hour, then return it to an ice-packed cooler.
  • How long does potato salad last at room temperature? Up to 2 hours. But try to minimize the time sitting at room temperature if possible.
  • Can you freeze potato salad? Freezing is not recommended because of the mayonnaise. Mayo doesn’t freeze well and can separate after freezing, and the potatoes can become discolored. Celery also doesn’t freeze well. The best way to extend the life is keeping it in the refrigerator.

Potato salad variations

Want to try another spin on this classic recipe? Here are a few variations that can compete with this tasty recipe:

This best potato salad recipe is…

Vegetarian and gluten-free. For vegan, plant-based and dairy-free, go to Vegan Potato Salad.

Print
Potato Salad

The Best Potato Salad


  • Author: Sonja Overhiser
  • Prep Time: 20 minutes
  • Cook Time: 10 minutes
  • Total Time: 30 minutes
  • Yield: 8

Description

Here’s how to make the best potato salad recipe! This American-style salad is creamy and classic: maybe even better than Grandma’s.


Ingredients

  • 3 pounds Yukon gold potatoes*
  • 3 tablespoons white wine vinegar, divided
  • 1 ¼ teaspoon kosher salt, divided
  • 3 large celery stalks
  • 5 green onions, thinly sliced (both white and green portions)
  • ¼ cup red onion, minced
  • 2 tablespoons chopped fresh dill
  • ½ cup sweet pickle relish (or chopped dill pickles)
  • ½ cup mayonnaise
  • ½ cup Greek yogurt or sour cream
  • 3 tablespoons yellow mustard (or 2 yellow and 1 tablespoon Dijon)
  • 1 teaspoon celery seed

Instructions

  1. Boil the potatoes: Quarter the potatoes, keeping the skins on. Place them in a large saucepan filled with cold water. Bring it to a boil and cook for 8 to 15 minutes until tender when pricked with a fork. Drain and rinse the potatoes under cold water. Allow to cool slightly, then peel the skins off with your fingers and cut the potatoes into bite-sized pieces. Place the potatoes into a bowl and sprinkle with 2 tablespoons of the white wine vinegar and ½ teaspoon of the kosher salt. Mix and let stand 5 minutes.
  2. Meanwhile, prep the salad: Slice the celery stalks in half lengthwise, then thinly slice them. Thinly slice the green onions. Mince the red onion. Chop the dill.
  3. In a large bowl, mix the mayonnaise, Greek yogurt or sour cream, yellow mustard, Dijon mustard, celery seed, 1 tablespoon of the white wine vinegar, ¾ of the teaspoon kosher salt, and plenty of fresh ground pepper. Add the potatoes, celery, green onion, red onion, and sweet pickle relish and stir until fully combined. For best results, chill 2 hours before serving. Stores 5 days refrigerated.

Notes

*The variety here is important: use Yukon gold or gold potatoes for best results.

  • Category: Side dish
  • Method: Boiled
  • Cuisine: Salad
  • Diet: Vegetarian

Keywords: Potato salad, potato salad recipe

A Couple Cooks - Recipes worth repeating.

Easy Vegan “Tuna” Melt

Friends, the perfect soup companion is here: the vegan “tuna” melt! It’s no secret we have a great love for all kinds of sandwiches, and this plant-based take on a “tuna” sandwich is no exception. It’s comforting, classic, creamy, cheesy, and made with…

Easy Vegan “Tuna” Melt

Friends, the perfect soup companion is here: the vegan “tuna” melt! It’s no secret we have a great love for all kinds of sandwiches, and this plant-based take on a “tuna” sandwich is no exception. It’s comforting, classic, creamy, cheesy, and made with fiber-packed chickpeas! 

Even better? It comes together in 30 minutes with just 9 ingredients you probably already have around! Let’s make lunch!

How to Make a Vegan “Tuna” Melt

This scrumptious sammie starts with fiber-rich chickpeas!

Easy Vegan “Tuna” Melt from Minimalist Baker →

How to Make a Vegan “Charcuterie” Board

It’s party time, friends! We don’t know about you, but nothing says “party” to us more than an abundance of delicious, beautiful, and satisfying snacks — and nothing says “snacks” better than a charcuterie board!
When crafting this delectable display, …

How to Make a Vegan “Charcuterie” Board

It’s party time, friends! We don’t know about you, but nothing says “party” to us more than an abundance of delicious, beautiful, and satisfying snacks — and nothing says “snacks” better than a charcuterie board!

When crafting this delectable display, we made sure to hit all the marks (salty, sweet, savory, and spicy!) while keeping it super versatile and approachable.

How to Make a Vegan “Charcuterie” Board from Minimalist Baker →

Bread & Butter Refrigerator Pickles

Perfectly sweet and delightfully crisp, these quick bread & butter refrigerator pickles are leaps and bounds better than anything you can buy in the store, with the added benefit of being completely customizable to your personal tastes and preferences. Refrigerator pickles are undeniably the easiest kind of pickles no make, no fancy equipment or complicated […]

The post Bread & Butter Refrigerator Pickles first appeared on Love and Olive Oil.

Perfectly sweet and delightfully crisp, these quick bread & butter refrigerator pickles are leaps and bounds better than anything you can buy in the store, with the added benefit of being completely customizable to your personal tastes and preferences.

Refrigerator pickles are undeniably the easiest kind of pickles no make, no fancy equipment or complicated water baths necessary. They come together in minutes, and keep beautifully in the fridge for weeks, and result in beautifully crispy pickles.

Three uncovered jars of Bread & Butter Refrigerator Pickles in brine, with two kirby cucumbers on the side

The two main kinds of pickles commercially available are kosher dill and bread & butter. Dill pickles obviously have a dill-forward flavor, and are less sweet and more vinegary overall.

Bread and butter pickles, on the other hand, have more sugar and a different combination of spices and seasonings (primarily onion, mustard, and celery seed), resulting in a vastly different flavor profile.

I have yet to find any definitive information on the origins of the name; it seems to be somewhat of a mystery, though many sources claim the name is derived from a common depression-area sandwich featuring pickled cucumbers layered between slices of buttered bread.

(more…)

Easy Vegan Tartar Sauce

Say hello to the ultimate vegan tartar sauce! It’s tangy, sweet, saucy, creamy, and begging to be served with anything crispy and breaded! After a bit of experimentation, we feel confident we cracked the code for the best method. Bonus? Just 7 ingredie…

Easy Vegan Tartar Sauce

Say hello to the ultimate vegan tartar sauce! It’s tangy, sweet, saucy, creamy, and begging to be served with anything crispy and breaded! After a bit of experimentation, we feel confident we cracked the code for the best method. Bonus? Just 7 ingredients and 15 minutes required! Let us show you how it’s done!

What is Tartar Sauce?

Tartar sauce is a creamy condiment that’s often served with fried foods (or seafood if not vegan).

Easy Vegan Tartar Sauce from Minimalist Baker →

Homemade Fish Sticks

Did you know that it is easy to make fish sticks at home? YEP! And I promise they taste way better than frozen fish sticks you buy at the store. Plus, they are healthier because they are made with fresh and simple ingredients and they are baked and not…

Did you know that it is easy to make fish sticks at home? YEP! And I promise they taste way better than frozen fish sticks you buy at the store. Plus, they are healthier because they are made with fresh and simple ingredients and they are baked and not fried. The recipe is simple and…

The post Homemade Fish Sticks appeared first on Two Peas & Their Pod.

How to Make Dill Pickles

Here’s how to make dill pickles! Follow this easy, no fail tutorial to fill jars with the best tangy flavor and satisfying crunch. Did you know you can make homemade dill pickles in just 20 minutes? They’re tangy, salty sweet with just the right crunch: infinitely better than store bought. So why not try your hand at it? Not only will you feel a pride in your new skill, you’ll have two pint jars of bright green spears to eat for lunch, dinner and snacks. Trust us: the jars won’t last long! Here’s everything you need to know about how to make dill pickles. Finding the right cucumbers These dill pickles use small pickling cucumbers (also called baby or Kirby). Don’t even think about using a standard cucumber! The type for canning are small, thin cucumbers. They’re labeled different things at the store, so you might see them called baby cucumbers, pickling cucumbers or Kirby cucumbers. Other ingredients for this dill pickle recipe Other than the cucumbers, all you need is a handful of ingredients to make this dill pickles recipe! Here are the remaining ingredients you need for how to make dill pickles: Fresh dill: We like using fresh […]

A Couple Cooks – Healthy, Whole Food, & Vegetarian Recipes

Here’s how to make dill pickles! Follow this easy, no fail tutorial to fill jars with the best tangy flavor and satisfying crunch.

How to Make Dill Pickles

Did you know you can make homemade dill pickles in just 20 minutes? They’re tangy, salty sweet with just the right crunch: infinitely better than store bought. So why not try your hand at it? Not only will you feel a pride in your new skill, you’ll have two pint jars of bright green spears to eat for lunch, dinner and snacks. Trust us: the jars won’t last long! Here’s everything you need to know about how to make dill pickles.

Finding the right cucumbers

These dill pickles use small pickling cucumbers (also called baby or Kirby). Don’t even think about using a standard cucumber! The type for canning are small, thin cucumbers. They’re labeled different things at the store, so you might see them called baby cucumbers, pickling cucumbers or Kirby cucumbers.

Other ingredients for this dill pickle recipe

Other than the cucumbers, all you need is a handful of ingredients to make this dill pickles recipe! Here are the remaining ingredients you need for how to make dill pickles:

  • Fresh dill: We like using fresh dill in our dill pickles. If you can’t find it or prefer a look without the herb, you can also use dill seeds! Use 2 teaspoons dill seeds for this recipe.
  • Peppercorns & coriander seeds: These seeds add big herby flavor.
  • Garlic: Garlic adds just the right savory note.
  • Salt & sugar: Brings the flavor to the pickling brine.
  • White vinegar: This is what makes the pickling action happen.
How to make dill pickles

How to make dill pickles…in 20 minutes!

Once you’ve assembled the ingredients, pickling is a breeze! Here are the basic steps that you’ll follow for how to make dill pickles:

  • Cut the vegetables & pack the jars. Slice up those long, thin cucumbers and pack them into the jars with dill and garlic.
  • Make the brine. Dissolve the salt and sugar in the vinegar and water: it takes only 1 minute on the stove.
  • Pour in the brine & cap the lid. Then pour in the brine, tap them on the counter to release any air bubbles, and cap the lid.
  • Refrigerate 24 hours, or process for longer storage. Keep reading…
Pouring in the pickle brine
Pouring in the pickling brine

Method 1: Refrigerator pickles

Our favorite way to make dill pickles is refrigerator pickles! What are they and what are the pros and cons? Here’s a breakdown:

  • Refrigerator pickles keep for 1 month in the refrigerator! You can eat them after 24 hours of refrigeration.
  • They’re not shelf stable, but really: who needs them to be? We always eat them faster than 1 month.
  • Refrigerator pickles are crunchy and bright green, with a crisp, tangy flavor. Processing the pickles makes them softer and milder. This is the main reason we love to make dill pickles as refrigerator pickles!
Refrigerator dill pickles
Refrigerator pickles come out bright green with a crisp texture and punchy flavor

Method 2: Shelf stable pickles

Want your dill pickles recipe to last up to 1 year? Then you can process your pickles. Processing the pickles is simply boiling them for 10 minutes in a large pot. This kills all bacteria and allows them to be shelf stable for 1 year. Here’s more about this method:

  • You’ll need a canning rack or any rack that keeps the jars off of the bottom of the pot.
  • It takes 10 minutes to boil a jar of dill pickles.
  • Processed pickles are softer, sweeter and milder, with a dull green color. This is because the boiling water cooks the pickles a bit. Alex and I prefer refrigerator pickles for their flavor and color, but the shelf stable pickles are delicious too!
Processed pickles
Processed dill pickles are shelf stable for one year!

Classic recipes with dill pickles

Now that you know how to make dill pickles: let’s eat! Our favorite way to eat them is to snack on them out of the jar (right?). But there are a few classic recipes that wouldn’t be the same without dill pickles. Here are a few recipes with pickles:

Let us know if you try our method in the comments below! PS check out our top dill recipes for what to do with the rest of your herbs!

This dill pickle recipe is…

Vegetarian, vegan, plant-based, dairy-free and gluten-free.

Print
How to Make Dill Pickles

How to Make Dill Pickles


1 Star2 Stars3 Stars4 Stars5 Stars (7 votes, average: 5.00 out of 5)

  • Author: Sonja Overhiser
  • Prep Time: 20 minutes
  • Cook Time: 0 minutes
  • Total Time: 20 minutes
  • Yield: 2 pint jars
  • Diet: Vegan

Description

Here’s how to make dill pickles! Follow this easy, no fail tutorial to fill jars with the best tangy flavor and satisfying crunch.


Ingredients

  • 2 1-pint wide-mouth mason jars with lids
  • 1 1/2 to 2 pounds small cucumbers (like Kirby)
  • 3 cloves garlic
  • 1/2 tablespoon coriander seeds
  • 1 tablespoon whole peppercorns
  • 1 tablespoon kosher salt
  • 1/2 tablespoon sugar
  • 2/3 cup white vinegar
  • 1 1/3 cup water
  • 1 large handful fresh dill (or 2 teaspoons dill seeds)

Instructions

  1. Wash two mason jars and lids in hot soapy water, rinse, and let air dry.
  2. Quarter the cucumbers into four slices lengthwise (cut off tips so they to fit inside the jar). Peel and cut the garlic cloves in half.
  3. In a saucepan, place the coriander seeds, whole peppercorns, sugar, kosher salt, white vinegar and water. Whisk over low heat until fully dissolved, about 1 minute, then remove from the heat.
  4. In the two clean mason jars, tightly pack the cucumbers, garlic and fresh dill.
  5. Pour the brine mixture over the cucumbers. Tap the jars on the counter to release any air bubbles and top off the jar with extra water if any cucumbers are exposed.
  6. Wipe jar rims dry and place the lids on the jars and screw on the rings until they are hand tight.
  7. For refrigerator pickles (our favorite): Leave the jars in the fridge for 24 hours before tasting. The pickles last up to 1 month in the refrigerator (they’re not shelf stable, but they never last that long!).
  8. For shelf-stable canned pickles: Bring a large pot of water to a boil and have a canning rack ready. Place the jars in the boiling water with the jars lifted off of bottom of pot with a canning rack (or any rack that keeps them off the bottom). Boil for 10 minutes. Turn off the heat and allow to cool in the water for 5 minutes, then carefully transfer to cutting board and allow to cool to room temperature. Check the lids for a seal after 12 hours (make sure the lids pop down: if not, store the pickles in the refrigerator like in Step 8). Store in a cool place for up to 1 year.

  • Category: Essentials
  • Method: Canned
  • Cuisine: American

Keywords: How to Make Dill Pickles, Dill Pickles Recipes

More types of pickles

Love pickles? (Us too.) You can pickle all sorts of veggies: not just cucumbers! Here are some more to try:

A Couple Cooks - Healthy, Whole Food, & Vegetarian Recipes