Sourdough Pumpkin Bread (Vegan)

Having recently revived my sourdough starter, my collection of sourdough discard has started up again. Since it’s the spooky season (a.k.a October), it only felt appropriate to make a vegan pumpkin bread version of my sourdough banana bread!! Using homemade pumpkin puree I had planned on doing this a few weeks ago but found I there was NO CANNED PUMPKIN PUREE in stock anywhere near me & ordering it online would’ve cost £3 a tin! Who’s buying up all the canned pumpkin!? Anywho, I’m no stranger to making my own purees so I went ahead and bought a cooking pumpkin, cut it in half & roasted for an hour then scooped the flesh out & blended it up to make some puree. However I found that this homemade puree was much more watery than the canned puree so the loaf turned out gummy and crumbly. An intense few weeks of shoots got in the way but this week I got round to retesting it with homemade pumpkin puree which I strained in a cheesecloth-lined strainer set over a bowl for 3 hours. I also gathered up the edges of the cheesecloth after this time and gently squeezed until no more […]

The post Sourdough Pumpkin Bread (Vegan) appeared first on Izy Hossack – Top With Cinnamon.

sourdough pumpkin bread sliced with a cup of tea

Having recently revived my sourdough starter, my collection of sourdough discard has started up again. Since it’s the spooky season (a.k.a October), it only felt appropriate to make a vegan pumpkin bread version of my sourdough banana bread!!

a loaf of vegan sourdough pumpkin bread with tea being poured and winter squash

Using homemade pumpkin puree

I had planned on doing this a few weeks ago but found I there was NO CANNED PUMPKIN PUREE in stock anywhere near me & ordering it online would’ve cost £3 a tin! Who’s buying up all the canned pumpkin!? Anywho, I’m no stranger to making my own purees so I went ahead and bought a cooking pumpkin, cut it in half & roasted for an hour then scooped the flesh out & blended it up to make some puree. However I found that this homemade puree was much more watery than the canned puree so the loaf turned out gummy and crumbly.

An intense few weeks of shoots got in the way but this week I got round to retesting it with homemade pumpkin puree which I strained in a cheesecloth-lined strainer set over a bowl for 3 hours. I also gathered up the edges of the cheesecloth after this time and gently squeezed until no more water was coming out. This resulted in a texture which was much more like the canned pumpkin puree I buy. I tried it in a loaf and it worked a treat!!

a sliced sourdough pumpkin loaf on a plate with a cup of tea

Luckily, I’d had a conversation with someone on my IG DMs about converting my banana bread into a a pumpkin bread (shout out to Kelsey!!). She actually tested the recipe too – telling me her changes of increasing the sugar slightly & lowering the pumpkin slightly – and declared it a success 🙂 I’ve made it both with 150g sugar and 200g sugar and they both work out so it’s up to you and your preferred level of sweetness.

As well as these changes, I made a custom pumpkin spice blend for the cake with cinnamon, nutmeg, cloves & ginger for that Autumnal flavour. As I had some oranges to hand, I grated in some zest too as I always find it helps to round out the spices in things like carrot cakes & pumpkin breads. This is such a delicious, soft loaf and is VERY moreish. Perfect for a cuppa as an afternoon snack!

Other sourdough discard recipes

Sourdough Pumpkin Bread (Vegan)

Sourdough Pumpkin Bread (Vegan)

Yield: 1 loaf (serves 12)

A warmly spiced vegan pumpkin bread which uses sourdough discard!

Ingredients

  • 200g (3/4 cup plus 1 tbsp) pumpkin puree* (SEE NOTES if using homemade)
  • 150g (3/4 cup) to 200g (1 cup) light brown sugar*
  • 90g (1/3 cup + 2 tsp) neutral oil or light olive oil
  • 2 tsp ground cinnamon
  • 1/2 tsp freshly grated nutmeg
  • 1/2 tsp ground ginger
  • 1/8 tsp ground cloves
  • zest of 1 orange, finely grated
  • 1/4 tsp fine table salt
  • 150g (3/4 cup) sourdough starter/discard (100% hydration)
  • 120g (1 cup) plain white (all-purpose) flour
  • 1 tsp bicarbonate of soda (baking soda)

Topping (optional):

  • 2 tbsp light brown sugar
  • 3 tbsp pumpkin seeds/pepitas

Instructions

  1. Preheat the oven to 180°C fan (350°F). Grease a 2lb loaf tin with some oil and line with a sling of baking paper.
  2. In a large bowl, mix the pumpkin puree, sugar, oil, spices, orange zest and salt until smooth. Stir in the sourdough starter. Lastly, add the flour and bicarbonate of soda. Fold together until just combined.
  3. Pour the batter into your lined loaf tin. Sprinkle with the topping of light brown sugar and pumpkin seeds, if using.
  4. Bake for 55-70 minutes - a toothpick inserted into the centre should come out clean. If the loaf looks like it's browning too much but is not cooked through yet, tent the top with foil for the last 20 minutes of baking.
  5. Allow to cool before removing from the tin, slicing & serving.

Notes

Adapted from my Sourdough Banana Bread (vegan)

Amount of sugar: use 150g for a slightly less sweet loaf or 200g if you prefer things sweeter

If using homemade pumpkin puree: it is essential that your pumpkin puree is drained before weighing & using in this recipe. To do this, line a sieve (mesh strainer) set over a bowl with 2 layers of cheesecloth. Fill with your homemade pumpkin puree and leave to drain for 2-3 hours. After this time, gather up the edges of the cheesecloth and twist together at the top. Gently squeeze the bundle of puree to remove any last bit of water - don't squeeze too hard or the puree may start to seep through the cheesecloth! The texture should be very thick just like canned pumpkin puree. You can now measure it out and use it in the recipe.

To make homemade pumpkin puree: cut your pumpkin in half. Place cut side down on a baking tray and roast at 180C fan (350F) for 1-2 hours until completely soft. Remove from the oven, flip over and scoop out the seeds then discard them. Scoop the flesh into a blender/food processor/bowl with sitck blender, discard the skin. Blitz the flesh until smooth then drain as instructed above.

What is 100% hydration sourdough starter? This means that when feeding your starter, you're using an equal weight of flour & water (e.g. feeding it with 50g flour & 50g water each time).

Non-Vegan option: use 100g butter, melted, in place of the oil.

Have you made this recipe?
I’d love to see how it went! Tag me on instagram @izyhossack and hashtag it #topwithcinnamon so I can have a look & reshare in my stories!

The post Sourdough Pumpkin Bread (Vegan) appeared first on Izy Hossack - Top With Cinnamon.

How to Roast Pumpkin Seeds (with 3 Recipes!)

How to Roast Pumpkin Seeds (with 3 Recipes!)
If you’re carving pumpkins, save those seeds that get scraped out and make these delicious crunchy roasted pumpkin seeds. This is an easy, basic method with three seasoning recipes included… use any of the…

How to Roast Pumpkin Seeds (with 3 Recipes!)

If you're carving pumpkins, save those seeds that get scraped out and make these delicious crunchy roasted pumpkin seeds. This is an easy, basic method with three seasoning recipes included... use any of them of your favorite combination of spices! An awesome fall treat!

READ: How to Roast Pumpkin Seeds (with 3 Recipes!)

Poilane’s Corn Flour Bread

At some point, we’re all going to have to decide on the same measuring system. Maybe we can make it our New Year’s resolution? Most of the world is using the metric system while a few holdouts, namely the United States, Liberia, and Burma, are sticking with other systems of measurement. For the record, I know some very good bakers that use cups and tablespoons,…

At some point, we’re all going to have to decide on the same measuring system. Maybe we can make it our New Year’s resolution? Most of the world is using the metric system while a few holdouts, namely the United States, Liberia, and Burma, are sticking with other systems of measurement. For the record, I know some very good bakers that use cups and tablespoons, and I like them as well.

Anyone who says they aren’t accurate hasn’t encountered a French recipe that calls for un verre de vin de lait (a “wine glass” of milk), a cullière à soupe (a soup spoon) of baking powder, or trois feuilles de gélatine, when every sheet of gelatin I’ve come across is either a different size, weight, or strength. And my wine glasses come in a lot of different sizes, too, although I always seem to reach for the largest ones…but not necessarily for baking.

Although books have been written on the subject, my take is that most Americans like holding measuring spoons and cups. It’s more tactile and visceral, kind of like how many of us holdouts don’t want to make dinner in a machine that will make it for us.

Many of us have fond memories of measuring cups, having seen our parents and grandparents using them, and having them handed down to us, but for recipe writers, metrics really are the way to go. The accuracy issue aside, it’s easy to cut a recipe down, say, 20%, which comes in handy when you’re testing a recipe but find that if you could somehow resize the batter down by 20-percent, it’d fit perfectly in a standard cake pan. Otherwise, you’re stuck telling people to use 3/4 cup plus 1 tablespoon of milk, or the 3 tablespoons plus 1/4 teaspoon of heavy cream I saw in a European cookbook that had been translated into English. I don’t know about you, but I’m not measuring out 1/4 teaspoon of cream to make a batch of ice cream.

Continue Reading Poilane’s Corn Flour Bread...

Multigrain and Seed Biscotti

I was browsing some older cookbooks recently. There are so many really great new cookbooks that come out every season that it’s easy to forget some of the beloved ones waiting patiently on our shelves, for us to return to them. Before electronics came on the scene, I used to curl up every night under the cover with an actual book or two, before dozing…

I was browsing some older cookbooks recently. There are so many really great new cookbooks that come out every season that it’s easy to forget some of the beloved ones waiting patiently on our shelves, for us to return to them. Before electronics came on the scene, I used to curl up every night under the cover with an actual book or two, before dozing off to bed.

The downside was that I always ended up bookmarking recipes that I wanted to make, and I’d get excited, and start running up and down (in back and forth) in my mind, about how I’m going to gather the ingredients when I wake up the next morning. Recently one that I came across was a recipe for Multigrain Biscotti in a cookbook from the ’90s that had nearly two dozen ingredients in it. But they sounded so good, I made a little (okay…not-so-little) shopping list, for the next day, using that list as a bookmark, planning to make them the next day.

Continue Reading Multigrain and Seed Biscotti...

Sweet Potato Chowder.

 This sweet potato chowder is a huge hug in a bowl for you!  Because… Monday. Yes yes. We all need a hug today.  Just LOOK AT THIS BOWL. I want to devour every last bite.  This soup is super comforting and hearty. It’s so warming and flavorful, it’s ridiculous! It’s a soup that can easily […]

The post Sweet Potato Chowder. appeared first on How Sweet Eats.

 This sweet potato chowder is a huge hug in a bowl for you! 

This sweet potato chowder is a hug in a bowl! Made with lots of greens and crunchy pancetta and pepitas for topping, it's a perfect weeknight meal.

Because… Monday. Yes yes. We all need a hug today. 

This sweet potato chowder is a hug in a bowl! Made with lots of greens and crunchy pancetta and pepitas for topping, it's a perfect weeknight meal.

Just LOOK AT THIS BOWL. I want to devour every last bite. 

This soup is super comforting and hearty. It’s so warming and flavorful, it’s ridiculous! It’s a soup that can easily be a meal, no salad or bread needed. Of course those are welcome additions and if you feel like pairing with some beer bread or a house salad, I don’t blame you.

This sweet potato chowder is a hug in a bowl! Made with lots of greens and crunchy pancetta and pepitas for topping, it's a perfect weeknight meal.

The whole pot starts off with some pancetta that we crisp up, then reserve for topping later. If you don’t eat meat, you can easily skip this part and use olive oil (or your oil of choice) to start everything off. The pancetta adds a lot of flavor and the crunch that I need on top. 

This sweet potato chowder is a hug in a bowl! Made with lots of greens and crunchy pancetta and pepitas for topping, it's a perfect weeknight meal.

The crunchy bits are what make it SO good. I’m never one to turn down a potato soup. I have a classic loaded potato soup recipe, as well as a loaded sweet potato soup too!

While they are both major comfort food, I always find that they need some texture on top. 

Or should I say… that I need some texture on top. 

Of course I do.

High maintenance for life!

My favorite way to add texture on top is the pancetta and a sprinkling of roasted, salted pepitas. So crunchy! So tasty! And so satisfying.

p.s.I actually loathe the word “tasty” but sometimes no other one will do. It’s a vibe. 

This sweet potato chowder is a hug in a bowl! Made with lots of greens and crunchy pancetta and pepitas for topping, it's a perfect weeknight meal.

After the soup simmers for a while, we’re going to toss in some tuscan kale too. I LOVE THIS. Getting in some greens, but in a warm bowl of comfort food, you know? I like to stir the greens in a few minutes before eating, because the kale holds a little crunch. It will soften by the next day for leftovers but it’s still super good.

Finally I stir in some milk or cream or even coconut cream. A little goes a long way and it makes the soup richer, more satisfying and overall more comforting. It’s not as brothy or thin and makes it FEEL like a heartier dish.

I mean, YUM. There is nothing like a giant pot of love to start the week off right.

This sweet potato chowder is a hug in a bowl! Made with lots of greens and crunchy pancetta and pepitas for topping, it's a perfect weeknight meal.

Sweet Potato Chowder

Sweet Potato Chowder

This sweet potato chowder is a hug in a bowl! Made with lots of greens and crunchy pancetta and pepitas for topping, it’s a perfect weeknight meal.

  • 4 ounces pancetta, (diced)
  • 1 tablespoon unsalted butter
  • 1 sweet onion, (diced)
  • 3 garlic cloves, (minced)
  • ½ teaspoon salt
  • ½ teaspoon pepper
  • ¼ teaspoon ground sage
  • ¼ teaspoon freshly ground nutmeg
  • ½ cup chopped carrots
  • 3 cups chopped sweet potato, (about 1 inch in size)
  • 5 cups reduced-sodium chicken stock
  • ⅓ cup cream, half and half or coconut cream/milk
  • 2 cups chopped tuscan kale
  • 3 tablespoons roasted salted pepitas, (for topping)
  1. Heat a large pot over medium-low heat and add the pancetta. Cook, stirring occasionally, until the fat is rendered and the pancetta is crisp, about 6 to 8 minutes. Remove the pancetta with a slotted spoon and place it on a paper towel lined plate to remove any excess grease.
  2. Keep the pot on medium low heat and add the butter. Stir in the onion, garlic, salt, pepper and sage. Stir in the fresh nutmeg. Cook, stirring occasionally, until the onions softened, about 5 minutes. Stir in the carrots and sweet potato, tossing everything to combine.
  3. Pour in the chicken stock and bring the mixture to a boil. Reduce it to a simmer and cook for 10 minutes. Cover and cook for an additional 10 to 15 minutes, or until the sweet potatoes cubes soften. Stir in the cream/halfhalf/etc. Taste the soup and season with additional salt or pepper if needed, but remember we will add the salty pancetta back on top too!
  4. A few minutes before serving, stir in the kale. I like to serve it almost immediately, but you can simmer the soup for another 10 minutes or so to soften it.
  5. Serve with the pancetta and pepitas for topping.

This sweet potato chowder is a hug in a bowl! Made with lots of greens and crunchy pancetta and pepitas for topping, it's a perfect weeknight meal.

Acceptable to eat for breakfast? I think.

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