Cute Oreo Eyeball Cake

Halloween may be my favorite time of the year to make treats. I love combining spooky and cute and serving it up as something sweet to eat. And this easy cake covers it all. Check out my Halloween section for more frightfully fun ideas to trick out your treats. Oreos are the stars when it […]

Oreo Cookie Cake

Halloween may be my favorite time of the year to make treats. I love combining spooky and cute and serving it up as something sweet to eat. And this easy cake covers it all.

Check out my Halloween section for more frightfully fun ideas to trick out your treats.

Separating Oreo Cookies

Oreos are the stars when it comes to making this cake come to life. Separate the cookies and creme carefully because they tend to pull apart with some of the creme center attached to each cookie wafer. I probably ruined more cookies than I was able to separate cleanly, so think about buying a family pack to give yourself extra chances. And, I’m sure you can find a happy home for any mess-ups. ; )

To separate, very gently twist the cookie wafers back and forth in tiny movements to try to keep the creme attached to one of the wafers. When successfully separated, you may still need to clean them up. Use a toothpick to gently scrape off any residual crumbs from the surface.

Oreo Cookie Eyes

Eye Candy! To turn these Oreos into eyes, you can use purple candy wafers and black M&M’s. Easy!! Green or orange candy wafers would be cute, too.

Gently press a candy wafer into the creme with the flat side facing up. Add a dot of white candy coating to the underside when you attach if you want to make them extra secure. Then, melt some of the purple candy wafers to attach the M&M’s. You’ll just need a small dot of melted candy coating to “glue” the two together.

Oreo Eyes

Look how cute!

But that’s not all! The cake itself is stuffed with Oreo cookies and the frosting is speckled with crumbs, too. Let me show you!

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Rob Roy

The Rob Roy cocktail was said to be invented at the Waldorf Astoria hotel in New York City, named after a Scottish outlaw in the 1700s, who later became a folk hero. The drink named for him is the drier cousin to the Manhattan, using blended Scotch whisky in place of the rye or bourbon. Unlike single-malt scotch, blended scotch is made from barley as…

The Rob Roy cocktail was said to be invented at the Waldorf Astoria hotel in New York City, named after a Scottish outlaw in the 1700s, who later became a folk hero. The drink named for him is the drier cousin to the Manhattan, using blended Scotch whisky in place of the rye or bourbon. Unlike single-malt scotch, blended scotch is made from barley as well as other grains and is usually only lightly peated, so it has less of the smoky flavors that are a feature of many single-malt scotch whiskies.

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Salt-Roasted Candied Peanuts

I’ll have to admit that I love peanuts, especially when they are candied with a touch of sea salt added. For years I’ve been making all sorts of candied nuts, including these candied peanuts, but this was one of the first candied nut recip…

I’ll have to admit that I love peanuts, especially when they are candied with a touch of sea salt added. For years I’ve been making all sorts of candied nuts, including these candied peanuts, but this was one of the first candied nut recipes I ever came up with and I’ve been making them ever since.

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La Buvette Terrine

It amuses me when people talk about snooty people sitting around, leisurely eating pâté, because pâté is rustic, country fare, not considered fancy in France. While pâté can have a pastry-type crust (pâté en croûte) and some are a little fancier than others, the cousins of pâté, terrines, are truly down-to-earth. They can be baked in a special mold (you can come across them at…

It amuses me when people talk about snooty people sitting around, leisurely eating pâté, because pâté is rustic, country fare, not considered fancy in France. While pâté can have a pastry-type crust (pâté en croûte) and some are a little fancier than others, the cousins of pâté, terrines, are truly down-to-earth. They can be baked in a special mold (you can come across them at French flea markets for around 5 bucks, like the one I used here), they can also be baked in any ovenproof bowl, which I did with this terrine. So there’s no excuse not to sit around and eat pâté, or terrine, all day. And not only is this one incredibly easy, it’s also one of the best terrines I’ve ever had.

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Dulce de Leche Brownies

I thought I’d share this recipe for Dulce de Leche Brownies from The Sweet Life in Paris because I had several jars of what the French call Confiture de lait in my refrigerator from another project. Since I happened to love the combination of ca…

I thought I’d share this recipe for Dulce de Leche Brownies from The Sweet Life in Paris because I had several jars of what the French call Confiture de lait in my refrigerator from another project. Since I happened to love the combination of caramelized milk and dark chocolate, I thought – Why not combine the two in brownies?

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Werewolf Cookies

Wee Werewolf Cookies … Howl cute! These so-soft chocolate sugar cookies with chocolate buttercream are super fun for Halloween! You’ll definitely want to sink your teeth into a few.  These cookies are quick, easy and kind of addictive. And you should totally bake some even if you don’t want to decorate them. I based them […]

Howl Cute Werewolf Cookies

Wee Werewolf Cookies … Howl cute! These so-soft chocolate sugar cookies with chocolate buttercream are super fun for Halloween! You’ll definitely want to sink your teeth into a few. 

Chocolate Cookie Dough

These cookies are quick, easy and kind of addictive. And you should totally bake some even if you don’t want to decorate them. I based them off these vanilla sugar cookies that I can’t stop making. They are so good!

The dough is scooped, rolled and then flattened slightly for a sweet little round canvas. 

So Soft Chocolate Cookies

Once the cookies are baked and cooled, scoop a small amount of chocolate buttercream on top. 

Wee Werewolf Chocolate Cookies

But how do we go from that to these sweet-fanged faces.

Let me show you.

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Coup de Roulis cocktail

This rosy coup holds a drink from Cocktails de Paris, a book of cocktail recipes from Paris, published in 1929. (It’s available to download* for free here.) I was attracted to it because it called for Cherry Rocher, a French liqueur produced by a distillery that was founded in 1704 and is still making it today. Coup de roulis translates to “strong blow,” referring to…

This rosy coup holds a drink from Cocktails de Paris, a book of cocktail recipes from Paris, published in 1929. (It’s available to download* for free here.) I was attracted to it because it called for Cherry Rocher, a French liqueur produced by a distillery that was founded in 1704 and is still making it today. Coup de roulis translates to “strong blow,” referring to the strong sway or roll of a boat. My guess is that maybe it got its name because it has four different spirits in it? No matter, I needed a strong drink last week when my apartment sprung a fuite d’eau, causing a flood.

The Paris cocktail book is an excursion back in time, as was the leak, harkening back to other, um…issues I’ve had with my apartment. In the pages, there are words used, such as Angustura (with an alternative spelling that may be from days of yore) and ‘focking,’ a term I’d never heard of either, and when I searched Google for “cocktail focking,” let’s just say most of the search results were adult-only…and I don’t mean in the cocktail department.

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Better Morning Blueberry Muffins

What’s your favorite morning muffin? Mine is blueberry. Since I was a kid, I’ve always enjoyed them warm and right out of the oven – served with a little bit of butter, melted on top. These are so good and will definitely make your day better. Break them open and take a look at those […]

Warm Blueberry Muffins

What’s your favorite morning muffin? Mine is blueberry. Since I was a kid, I’ve always enjoyed them warm and right out of the oven – served with a little bit of butter, melted on top.

These are so good and will definitely make your day better.

Bursting with Blueberries Muffins

Break them open and take a look at those berries! These muffins are made with a duo of fresh and frozen blueberries – Smaller in scale fresh blueberries and larger frozen blueberries – but you could certainly bake them with all of either kind.

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Buttermilk Fattoush

One of my very favorite salads is Fattoush. There are various versions of the salad, whose name comes from fatta, which refers to the crumbled or torn pieces of flatbread in the salad. But I’ve never had Fattoush with buttermilk dressing, so was intrigued when I saw a recipe for it in Falastin: A Cookbook by Sami Tamimi and Tara Wigley, a book which eloquently…

One of my very favorite salads is Fattoush. There are various versions of the salad, whose name comes from fatta, which refers to the crumbled or torn pieces of flatbread in the salad. But I’ve never had Fattoush with buttermilk dressing, so was intrigued when I saw a recipe for it in Falastin: A Cookbook by Sami Tamimi and Tara Wigley, a book which eloquently presents and reflects on Palestinean cuisine, its history, its people, and its culture. As soon as I got the book, the first thing I said to myself was, “This is one of the best books of the year.” It’s a great book.

A few years back, Sami told me that he was going to do a cookbook that updated the dishes and recipes of his homeland, making them relevant to today, just as he and Yotam Ottolenghi did for the diaspora of Middle Eastern foods in their previous books. Sami admits that this is a non-traditional Fattoush, one that his mother made, but likes it so much that he wanted to share it.

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Spanish Tortilla (Tortilla Española)

Here’s how to make a traditional Spanish tortilla! Tortilla española is a potato and egg omelette that is a classic dinner or tapas recipe. Here’s a traditional Spanish recipe that’s everywhere in country: Spanish tortilla! Tortilla española is a Spanish omelet made with eggs and sliced potatoes. You can find tortilla in almost every bar and restaurant. It’s a classic Spanish tapas recipe, sliced into wedges and often serve with a toothpick and a dab of aioli. It’s also often turned into a sandwich filling as a bocadillo de tortilla. When I lived in Spain years ago, I loved sampling each restaurant’s house version of tortilla. So we’re thrilled to bring you this recipe from the beautiful new cookbook Diala’s Kitchen by our pal Diala Canelo. Love Spanish recipes? Try our red sangria, classic paella, and patatas bravas. What is Spanish tortilla made of? The Spanish tortilla is an iconic dish known as Spanish omelete, tortilla española, or tortilla de papatas. It’s made by frying potatoes in olive oil, then cooking them into an egg omelette. Spaniards eat it for any meal: breakfast, lunch, dinner, and it’s one of the most popular Spanish tapas. In fact, it might be more […]

A Couple Cooks – Healthy, Whole Food, & Vegetarian Recipes

Here’s how to make a traditional Spanish tortilla! Tortilla española is a potato and egg omelette that is a classic dinner or tapas recipe.

Spanish tortilla

Here’s a traditional Spanish recipe that’s everywhere in country: Spanish tortilla! Tortilla española is a Spanish omelet made with eggs and sliced potatoes. You can find tortilla in almost every bar and restaurant. It’s a classic Spanish tapas recipe, sliced into wedges and often serve with a toothpick and a dab of aioli. It’s also often turned into a sandwich filling as a bocadillo de tortilla. When I lived in Spain years ago, I loved sampling each restaurant’s house version of tortilla. So we’re thrilled to bring you this recipe from the beautiful new cookbook Diala’s Kitchen by our pal Diala Canelo.

Love Spanish recipes? Try our red sangria, classic paella, and patatas bravas.

What is Spanish tortilla made of?

The Spanish tortilla is an iconic dish known as Spanish omelete, tortilla española, or tortilla de papatas. It’s made by frying potatoes in olive oil, then cooking them into an egg omelette. Spaniards eat it for any meal: breakfast, lunch, dinner, and it’s one of the most popular Spanish tapas. In fact, it might be more prevalent than the national rice dish, paella! Make it correctly and you’ll have a perfectly salted, thick pieces of omelette layered with buttery fried potatoes.

Here are the ingredients you’ll need to make a Spanish tortilla:

  • Yukon gold potatoes: Use only Yukon Gold potatoes or another waxy potato like red potatoes. Do not use starchy potatoes like russet potatoes, as the texture is more mealy than buttery.
  • Olive oil and salt: This recipe calls for quite a bit of extra virgin olive oil and salt, but most are discarded as part of the frying process.
  • Eggs: The egg ties it all together! Use cage free organic eggs where possible.
  • Mayonnaise, for serving: If you’re not Spanish, this might seem odd. But a slather of mayo or more traditionally aioli, is the perfect sauce for the final flavor.
How to make Spanish tortilla

How to make Spanish tortilla, aka tortilla española

This is the traditional way to make Spanish tortilla, so it’s going to take a little time. Set aside 1 hour for this task! It’s not a quick and easy dinner recipe: view it as a fun project to experience Spanish culture. The nice thing is that you can easily make it ahead, and let it rest until mealtime or refrigerate leftovers for later (see below). Here are a few tips to know about how to make tortilla española:

  • Use a 10-inch cast-iron skillet or non-stick pan. This size of pan gets the nice thick tortilla with potato layers. You can also use a 12-inch skillet; it makes a thinner tortilla. Watch the cook time as it can vary.
  • Thinly slice potatoes and fry them, then add onion. Fry the potatoes for about 10 minutes, until tender and golden. Add the chopped onion in the last 5 minutes.
  • Add beaten eggs and cook until browned on the bottom but slightly runny on top. Watch the heat level! You don’t want it too high or the bottom will burn. Check occasionally with a spatula. Be careful if you have a large burner: keep it on medium low heat.
  • If you sense it’s going to burn, broil! Here’s a troubleshooting tip. If you sense the bottom is going to burn before the top is mostly set, remove it from the stove and broil the top until it’s slightly runny. This will make it easier to flip.
  • Flip and cook the other side. Place the cutting board on top and then flip the tortilla right onto it. Cook the other side until set (about 5 minutes). Then invert it onto a cutting board again, so the top side is up.
Tortilla española

Eat it cold, room temperature, or warm

Can you eat Spanish tortilla cold? One of the great things about tortilla española is that you can eat it cold, room temperature or warm. That makes it incredibly versatile. Eat it warm for dinner or brunch as a main dish. Serve it room temperature or cold sliced into wedges or squares as a Spanish tapas recipe. Really anything goes!

You can leave Spanish tortilla out on the counter at room temperature for up to 2 hours before serving, making it easy to make up in advance. In Spain, people leave it out even longer: they’re much more liberal with leaving things on the counter than we are here in America (and I never had any adverse effects!).

Spanish tortilla

How long will a Spanish tortilla keep?

How long does Spanish tortilla last? 3 days. You can serve tortilla española at a variety of temperatures, so it’s easy to serve as leftovers or make in advance. Here are some notes:

  • Keep it 2 to 3 hours at room temperature before serving. You can leave it for longer if desired (see notes above).
  • Refrigerate for up to 3 days. You can serve it cold, or let it stand and come to room temperature.
  • Reheat Spanish tortilla in a 300 degree oven for a few minutes if you’d like to serve it warm.

What to eat with Spanish tortilla

There are many ways to eat Spanish tortilla, depending on what meal of the day it is. Spainards traditionally eat tortilla española any time of the day: breakfast, lunch, dinner or tapas. Here are some ideas:

  • Brunch or dinner: Serve warm with an arugula salad and fresh bread.
  • Sandwich: Make a bocadillo de tortilla: serve it room temperature between two pieces of baguette slathered with mayonnaise.
  • Tapas: Cut it into wedges or squares and eat with toothpicks. Serve it in a spread with marinaded olives, marcona almonds, Manchego cheese, and jamón serrano (the Spanish version of prosciutto).
Diala's Kitchen

About the book: Diala’s Kitchen

This recipe comes to you straight from the new cookbook Diala’s Kitchen, written by the lovely Diala Canelo. Diala is an incredible recipe developer and food photographer (you must follow her on Instagram). She is Dominican and now lives in Toronto, and loves to travel. One of the things we love about her book is that her food style is so similar to ours: fresh, plant-forward meals with occasional beautiful seafood, too. We literally want to make every recipe in the book: Falafel Salad, Salmon Burgers, Green Goddess Soup, Baked Feta, Truffle Pasta, Shrimp Stew with Coconut-Tomato Sauce, Caramelized Banana and Cinnamon Loaf, Pumpkin Scones…the list goes on!

One special thing about this Spanish tortilla recipe is that Diala and I connected over a deep love for Barcelona. I studied abroad in Madrid and while I adore that city, my heart was stolen by beautiful Barca. Alex and I visited Barcelona in 2018 with our son Larson and I got to share all my favorite food memories with them. Diala recently visited Barcelona this year, and growing up Dominican, her culture was heavily influenced by Spanish cuisine. So we are absolutely thrilled to share her recipe for traditional tortilla española. Congratulations Diala, on an incredible book! We can’t wait to cook through it more.

Tapas recipe

This Spanish tortilla recipe is…

Vegetarian and gluten-free.

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Spanish tortilla

Spanish Tortilla (Tortilla Española)


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  • Author: Sonja Overhiser
  • Prep Time: 25 minutes
  • Cook Time: 30 minutes
  • Total Time: 55 minutes
  • Yield: 6
  • Diet: Vegetarian

Description

Here’s how to make a traditional Spanish tortilla! Tortilla española is a potato and egg omelette that is a classic dinner or tapas recipe.


Ingredients

For the Spanish tortilla

  • 6 medium Yukon Gold potatoes (about 2 pounds)*
  • 2 3/4 teaspoons kosher salt, divided
  • 1 1/2 cups plus 2 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil, divided**
  • 1 medium white onion
  • 10 eggs

To serve

  • Italian parsley
  • Mayonnaise
  • Sweet paprika

Instructions

  1. Peel and slice the potatoes into 1/4-inch slices (a mandoline is handy if you have it, but not required).
  2. Place the potatoes in a large colander set over a large bowl or in the sink. Sprinkle with 2 teaspoons of the salt and toss to coat. Let sit for 15 minutes. Pat dry with paper towels. While the potatoes sit, dice the onion.
  3. In a 10-inch non-stick or cast iron skillet***, heat 1 1/2 cups of the olive oil over medium-high heat. Place the potatoes in the hot oil and cook, turning occasionally, until browned and tender, 10 to 14 minutes.
  4. Add the onion and cook, stirring often, until soft and translucent, about 5 minutes.
  5. Using a slotted spoon, transfer the potatoes and onion to a large bowl. In another large bowl, beat the eggs. Then transfer the potatoes and onion into the eggs. Drain the oil from the pan and wipe it clean.
  6. In the same pan, brush it with olive oil if it is a cast-iron skillet. Then heat the remaining 2 tablespoons olive oil over medium low heat. Pour the potato and onion mixture into the pan and using a spatula, spread it out evenly and smooth the top. Cook on medium low heat until the tortilla is golden on the bottom and almost set, about 10 to 12 minutes. It should still be slightly runny on top. (If it’s getting dark on the bottom and the top is still very runny, transfer it to a broiler and broil until the top is mostly set but still slightly runny.)
  7. Invert the tortilla onto a large plate. Slide the tortilla back into the frying pan, browned side up. Cook until golden on the bottom, about 4 minutes.
  8. Invert the tortilla again onto a cutting board. It’s best after sitting for 15 minutes to allow it to set, or you can let it sit up to 2 hours at room temperature before serving. Serve topped with chopped parsley and cut into wedges. For best flavor, top the wedges with dab of mayonnaise and a sprinkle of paprika.
  9. Make ahead and storage: Leftovers save very well and can be served cold, room temperature or warm. Refrigerate up to 3 days. If desired, reheat in a 300 degree oven until warm, but it’s great at room temp. You can also make it into a tortilla sandwich (bocadillo de tortilla): eat it room temperature between two slices of baguette slathered with mayo.

Notes

Recipe reprinted with permission from Diala’s Kitchen: Plant Forward and Pescatarian Recipes Inspired by Home and Travel by Diala Canelo.

*Use Yukon Gold or another waxy potato like red skinned. Do not use russet potatoes.

** Only 1/4 cup of olive oil is used in the recipe; the rest is discarded as part of frying. Most of the salt is also absorbed by the frying oil and discarded.

***You can also use a larger pan like a 12-inch skillet: the tortilla will be thinner and the cook time will vary a little.

  • Category: Main Dish
  • Method: Stovetop
  • Cuisine: Spanish

Keywords: Spanish tortilla, Tortilla Española, Spanish tapas recipes, tapas recipes

A Couple Cooks - Healthy, Whole Food, & Vegetarian Recipes