Why I Ditched a WFH Desk for the…Floor

While working from home undoubtedly has its perks—easy access to snacks and an all-sweats uniform are top contenders—there are some disadvantages that come with the territory, too: for one, my studio apartment isn’t the most spacious, so I’ve put off b…

While working from home undoubtedly has its perks—easy access to snacks and an all-sweats uniform are top contenders—there are some disadvantages that come with the territory, too: for one, my studio apartment isn't the most spacious, so I've put off buying a desk. To make do, I've been working from the couch, which, too often, leads to the feeling that I should be relaxing instead of working. Besides, a day on the couch leaves my back feeling hunched and tight.

A few weeks ago, I made some changes. In an effort to feel like more of an upright worker, I decided to have my low coffee table stand in for a desk, and ditch the idea of a chair completely. I’ve never been happier to get to work: Sitting cross-legged on the rug, I feel less sluggish, more aware of my posture, and much more comfortable than I would if I had to unfold myself from whatever half-horizontal position I used to be in on the couch.

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The One-Minute Self-Care Ritual I Practice Every Day

Not too long ago—and yet, it feels like another lifetime—my two-hour train and bus rides to work, and long days once I got there, were starting to wear me out. I don’t think I fully comprehended just how much energy the commutes were taking out of me. …

Not too long ago—and yet, it feels like another lifetime—my two-hour train and bus rides to work, and long days once I got there, were starting to wear me out. I don’t think I fully comprehended just how much energy the commutes were taking out of me. Until I did.

To help, I tried several things: listening to podcasts on my commute, a quick midday workout, but I couldn’t shake that out-of-sorts feeling. I considered trying a daily meditation routine—my friends had boundless ideas and apps to offer—but the problem was that most required setting aside 20 minutes of my time each day. I did not have 20 minutes (I did, but I didn't...you know?). Or perhaps I was just overwhelmed by the idea of sitting still, in complete silence, for long stretches of time.

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How to Make a Grain Bowl With Whatever’s in Your Fridge

I realize that I may be alone here when I say that bowls are my favorite piece of dishware. (What, you don’t have a favorite eating vessel?)
Hear me out: Unlike plates, which waste sauce and discourage you from mixing a meal’s different components, bow…

I realize that I may be alone here when I say that bowls are my favorite piece of dishware. (What, you don't have a favorite eating vessel?)

Hear me out: Unlike plates, which waste sauce and discourage you from mixing a meal's different components, bowls are vessels that empower you to layer multiple flavors and top everything off with a grand finale of dressing. Which brings me to grain bowls.

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Why I’m Swapping Chia for Basil Seeds (at Least Sometimes)

I remember the first time I ever saw basil seeds. It was in the drink aisle of a gigantic Asian grocery store. I did a double-take; basil seeds? In a drink? Obviously, I had to try one.

The beverage was citrusy and filled with floating, gelatinous see…

I remember the first time I ever saw basil seeds. It was in the drink aisle of a gigantic Asian grocery store. I did a double-take; basil seeds? In a drink? Obviously, I had to try one.

The beverage was citrusy and filled with floating, gelatinous seeds with the texture of tapioca. It was unfamiliar to me, and at first, I thought the texture was a little slimy—but I actually enjoyed it. The seeds gave the drink a bit of chewy substance, and imparted a light, herbaceous flavor to the lemony drink.

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How—and Why—to Use Buckwheat Flour in More of Your Baking

Did you grow up eating buckwheat pancakes and loving (or hating) kasha? Maybe you’ve tasted buckwheat crepes in Brittany, slurped soba noodles in Japanese restaurants, or have a passing acquaintance with blinis and caviar? If so, you might think that y…

Did you grow up eating buckwheat pancakes and loving (or hating) kasha? Maybe you’ve tasted buckwheat crepes in Brittany, slurped soba noodles in Japanese restaurants, or have a passing acquaintance with blinis and caviar? If so, you might think that you know buckwheat.

Its name notwithstanding, the buckwheat plant is a pseudo-cereal—neither grass nor grain—and has nothing to do with wheat. Gluten- and grain-free, organic buckwheat flour has more protein, dietary fiber, and B vitamins than an equal weight of oat or whole wheat flour, and is an excellent source of potassium and essential amino acids. If you are an avid omnivore (like me) such details are incidental; you’ll fall in love with buckwheat for its robust, earthy, grassy, slightly bitter (in a good way), hoppy flavors, which also has hints of rose. I also just love how the flour looks—it’s a slate-y lavender brown, flecked with darker bits of hull.

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10 Ideas to Ease the Mind—& Help You Relax

Now more than ever, home is where many of us are seeking refuge and solace in light of the novel coronavirus. This is a tough time, but we’re here for you—whether it’s a new pantry recipe or a useful tip for your kitchen, here are some ideas to make th…

Now more than ever, home is where many of us are seeking refuge and solace in light of the novel coronavirus. This is a tough time, but we’re here for you—whether it’s a new pantry recipe or a useful tip for your kitchen, here are some ideas to make things run a little more smoothly for you and your loved ones.


Last night I finally had the breakdown that’s been bubbling up inside of me for days. It was Day Ten of our social isolation period; I hadn’t been physically outside my apartment door in maybe five days, and my boyfriend and I had been working from home together for over a week—tensions were high.

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A Guide to Staying Calm, According to Two Friends

Now more than ever, home is where many of us are seeking refuge and solace in light of the novel coronavirus. This is a tough time, but we’re here for you—whether it’s a new pantry recipe or a useful tip for your kitchen, here are some ideas to make th…

Now more than ever, home is where many of us are seeking refuge and solace in light of the novel coronavirus. This is a tough time, but we’re here for you—whether it’s a new pantry recipe or a useful tip for your kitchen, here are some ideas to make things run a little more smoothly for you and your loved ones.


It’s 10 a.m. on a Monday and I’m drinking my anxieties away.

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10 Ways to Stay Active at Home—Without Breaking Something

Now more than ever, home is where many of us are seeking refuge and solace in light of the novel coronavirus. This is a tough time, but we’re here for you—whether it’s a new pantry recipe or a useful tip for your kitchen, here are some ideas to make th…

Now more than ever, home is where many of us are seeking refuge and solace in light of the novel coronavirus. This is a tough time, but we’re here for you—whether it’s a new pantry recipe or a useful tip for your kitchen, here are some ideas to make things run a little more smoothly for you and your loved ones.


If there’s anything I’ve learned from the past week or so of social distancing, it’s that I can get pretty lackadaisical when it comes to keeping my body in motion. Before COVID-19 closed down thousands of gyms, boutique studios, and personal training sessions nationwide, I was regularly taking classes at my local barre studio down the street. Last week, the owners made the tough—but necessary—decision to close down their studios temporarily. Instead, they’ve been offering classes via Facebook Live and Instagram.

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Why I Ate Nothing but Soup for 54 Days

It took three years of living in New York for me to finally find a place that felt like home. When a friend of a friend posted on Facebook in the fall of 2012 that the apartment next door to him and his wife in Red Hook was opening up and came with a s…

It took three years of living in New York for me to finally find a place that felt like home. When a friend of a friend posted on Facebook in the fall of 2012 that the apartment next door to him and his wife in Red Hook was opening up and came with a shared backyard, I couldn't break the lease on my tiny windowless room in Williamsburg fast enough. Along with the yard came eight pet chickens, which meant I could run outside and in minutes would be biting into the vibrant orange yolks found only in eggs that fresh. My neighbors would make frozen egg custards in the summertime, filled with swirls of jams and crumbled homemade cookie bits.

After two years of living in that apartment, my neighbors split up and he moved out, leaving behind not only his wife but the chickens as well. She worked nights and wasn’t always home to lock up the coops before night fell, when the raccoons and possums of Brooklyn arose from their daytime slumber. It very quickly became a regular occurrence to hear the chickens’ awful, strangled screams in the middle of the night as they fell prey one by one.

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Finding My Way Back to Food in the Face of an Eating Disorder

The red flag notification filled me with adrenaline, my limbs went wiggly and warm. It’s the feeling I now associate with a big swig of beer. But this was 2007, and I’d recently installed Honesty Box, the Facebook application where people could anonymo…

The red flag notification filled me with adrenaline, my limbs went wiggly and warm. It’s the feeling I now associate with a big swig of beer. But this was 2007, and I’d recently installed Honesty Box, the Facebook application where people could anonymously share their thoughts on others.

The new message read:

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