Easy White Chicken Chili

This comforting and delicious white chicken chili is easy to make thanks to rotisserie chicken. You can have a bowl of yummy white chicken chili on the dinner table in no time! During the fall and winter months, we are always looking for easy and comfo…

This comforting and delicious white chicken chili is easy to make thanks to rotisserie chicken. You can have a bowl of yummy white chicken chili on the dinner table in no time! During the fall and winter months, we are always looking for easy and comforting dinner recipes, how about you? Chili is always a…

The post Easy White Chicken Chili appeared first on Two Peas & Their Pod.

Mediterranean White Bean Salad

You can never have enough easy side dish recipes, am I right?? I like to keep my side dishes simple so they don’t steal the show from my main dish, and they don’t add a lot of extra work to the overall preparation of the meal. Simple salads like this Mediterranean White Bean Salad only […]

The post Mediterranean White Bean Salad appeared first on Budget Bytes.

You can never have enough easy side dish recipes, am I right?? I like to keep my side dishes simple so they don’t steal the show from my main dish, and they don’t add a lot of extra work to the overall preparation of the meal. Simple salads like this Mediterranean White Bean Salad only take minutes to prepare, they bring flavor, color, and texture to your plate, and they hold up really well as leftovers (hello, tomorrow’s lunch). Bookmark this one, because I know you’ll use this recipe a lot!

Originally posted 2-19-2010, updated 8-22-2020.

A big bowl full of Mediterranean White Bean Salad with tomatoes and parsley on the side

This Mediterranean style bean salad was inspired by one of my all-time favorite salads, tabbouleh, but it uses white beans instead of bulgar. It has all that tangy lemon-garlic flavor that I love about tabbouleh, but without needing to spend time cooking and cooling bulgur.

What Kind of Beans Can I Use?

I used large butter beans for this recipe, but if you don’t have butter beans available try cannellini beans or chickpeas. I would avoid softer beans that tend to mash easily, like navy beans or great northern beans. Cannellini beans and chickpeas are large enough and firm enough to hold up to the stirring of this salad.

What to Serve with Mediterranean White Bean Salad

The flavors in this white bean salad (lemon and garlic) are so versatile that it makes a great side dish for a wide variety of mains. Try it with Garlic Butter Baked Cod, Baked Pizza Chicken, Greek Turkey Burgers, Creamy Spinach Artichoke Chicken, Oven Baked Fish with Tomatoes, or Chicken Piccata. Or, this could be one part of a vegetarian spread with some homemade hummus, pita, and falafel

How Long Does This Salad Stay Good?

This is another great example of a “refrigerator salad” or a salad that holds up really well in the refrigerator. This salad will stay enjoyable when stored in the refrigerator for a good four days or so. The flavors will blend and the beans will marinate in the dressing as it refrigerates, making it even better the next day! Make sure to give it a stir just before serving to redistribute the flavors.

Front view of a bow full of mediterranean white bean salad

 
Overhead view of a bowl full of Mediterranean White Bean Salad with parsley, tomatoes, and garlic on the side

Mediterranean White Bean Salad

This Mediterranean White Bean Salad is a fast, easy, and fresh side dish that pairs nicely with any grilled or roasted meat.
Total Cost $4.87 recipe / $1.22 serving
Prep Time 15 minutes
Cook Time 0 minutes
Total Time 15 minutes
Servings 4 1 cup each
Calories 843.2kcal
Author Beth - Budget Bytes

Ingredients

  • 2 Tbsp olive oil $0.24
  • 2 Tbsp lemon juice $0.06
  • 2 cloves garlic, minced $0.16
  • 1/4 tsp salt $0.02
  • 1/4 tsp freshly cracked black pepper $0.02
  • 2 15oz. cans butter beans* $1.38
  • ½ bunch fresh parsley $0.40
  • 1 pint grape tomatoes $1.49
  • 2 oz. feta cheese $1.10

Instructions

  • Prepare the dressing first. In a small bowl, combine the olive oil, lemon juice, minced garlic, salt, and pepper. Set the dressing aside.
  • Rinse and drain the canned beans. Allow them to drain while you prepare the rest of the ingredients.
  • Finely chop about 1 cup of fresh parsley (about ½ bunch). Cut the grape tomatoes in half.
  • Add the drained beans, chopped parsley, tomatoes, and 2 oz. feta cheese to a bowl. Pour the prepared dressing over top, then stir to combine. Serve immediately or refrigerate up to four days.

Notes

*You can use cannellini beans or chickpeas in place of butter beans.

Nutrition

Serving: 1cup | Calories: 843.2kcal | Carbohydrates: 90.3g | Protein: 33.9g | Fat: 36.3g | Sodium: 2209.6mg | Fiber: 29.1g

How to Make Mediterranean White Bean Salad – Step by Step Photos

lemon garlic dressing in a small bowl

Make the dressing first. Combine 2 Tbsp olive oil, 2 Tbsp lemon juice, 2 cloves garlic (minced), ¼ tsp salt, and ¼ tsp freshly cracked pepper in a small bowl. Set the dressing aside.

Rinsed white beans in a colander

Rinse and drain two 15oz. cans of butter beans (or cannellini or chickpeas). Let them drain well.

Chopped parsley on a cutting board

Finely chop about one cup of fresh parsley (about ½ bunch). Slice one pint grape tomatoes in half.

Combine salad ingredients in a bowl

Add the beans, tomatoes, chopped parsley, 2 oz. crumbled feta, and the prepared dressing in a bowl.

Stirred salad in a bowl with two forks

Toss the ingredients to combine and serve!

Overhead view of a bowl full of Mediterranean White Bean Salad with parsley, tomatoes, and garlic on the side

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White Beans on Toast

Serving beans on toast makes them a meal! This simple, sophisticated recipe pairs white beans with garlic, broccoli rabe, and Parmesan cheese. Beans on toast. It sounds humble, but when you taste this you’ll be amazed. The recipe comes to us from the new cookbook Cool Beans by our pal Joe Yonan of The Washington Post, a book just as cool as it sounds. The premise: beans are one of the most economical, delicious, and planet-friendly foods that exist. And we all should eat more of them. Of course, that gets a hearty Amen! from Alex and me. We’re long time proponents of eating all the beans. Eating these silky, savory nuanced white beans over toast makes them into a tasty vegetarian meal, and topped with aged Parmesan: they’re a revelation. Why to eat more beans Why do beans have a bit of a sore reputation here in the US? They’re certainly not considered glamorous food. Almost no one replies to “What meal did you eat to celebrate your birthday?” with “a pot of beans” or “beans on toast”. Author Joe says in the book that could be because worldwide beans have almost always been associated with poverty. But there […]

A Couple Cooks – Healthy, Whole Food, & Vegetarian Recipes

Serving beans on toast makes them a meal! This simple, sophisticated recipe pairs white beans with garlic, broccoli rabe, and Parmesan cheese.

Beans on toast

Beans on toast. It sounds humble, but when you taste this you’ll be amazed. The recipe comes to us from the new cookbook Cool Beans by our pal Joe Yonan of The Washington Post, a book just as cool as it sounds. The premise: beans are one of the most economical, delicious, and planet-friendly foods that exist. And we all should eat more of them. Of course, that gets a hearty Amen! from Alex and me. We’re long time proponents of eating all the beans. Eating these silky, savory nuanced white beans over toast makes them into a tasty vegetarian meal, and topped with aged Parmesan: they’re a revelation.

Cool beans

Why to eat more beans

Why do beans have a bit of a sore reputation here in the US? They’re certainly not considered glamorous food. Almost no one replies to “What meal did you eat to celebrate your birthday?” with “a pot of beans” or “beans on toast”. Author Joe says in the book that could be because worldwide beans have almost always been associated with poverty.

But there are lots of reasons to change our hearts about beans here in the US. Indeed, so many cultures around the world celebrate them with great dishes (falafel! hummus! refried beans! lentil stew!). Here’s why to eat more beans, per Cool Beans:

  • They’re the cheapest source of protein in the world. They’re the only food that’s both categorized as a protein and vegetable by the USDA.
  • They’ve may help you live longer: the list of health benefits if beans is long: they’re nutrient-dense, rich in cancer fighting antioxidants and hearty-healthy fiber. Guess the commonality of Blue Zone diet countries where people live the longest in the world? They all eat 1 cup of beans per day.
  • They’re planet-friendly. Beans may be key to feeding the Earth’s growing population: they take less of a toll on the climate than animal proteins.
Beans on toast

How to cook dried white beans…with more flavor than ever!

Have you ever cooked dried beans? Alex and I often settle for canned beans out of convenience (sorry, Joe!) But when we have time, cooking a pot of dried beans results in a transcendentally more delicious end product. Especially if you add flavorings to the pot while it’s boiling! Now that we have an Instant Pot, we love making beans in the IP because it’s so quick (see our Instant Pot Black Beans, Chickpeas, Refried Beans & Pinto Beans).

All of the recipes in Cool Beans use dried beans: though of course you can substitute canned in a pinch. But why not use this as a challenge? Take this as an opportunity to take 1 hour and make beans the right way. Here’s how to make the white beans for this beans on toast recipe:

  • Soak your beans overnight (or 4 hours)! Soaking beans helps them cook faster and more evenly. You can get away with 4 hours if you forget to do it the night before.
  • Add flavorings! Here’s the key to getting the very best flavor: add a few simple flavorings to the pot with the beans. Here you’ll add 1 onion studded with whole cloves, 2 carrots, bay leaves and (here’s the kicker): a sheet of kombu! Kombu is dried seaweed often used in Japanese cooking. It’s 100% worth seeking it out for the nuance of flavor that it gives! You’ve got to try this.
  • Simmer in water for 1 hour. Just 1 hour gets them perfectly tender.
Beans on toast

Beans on toast: simple & sophisticated

The name for this recipe in the Cool Beans cookbook is this: “Garlicky Great Northern Beans and Broccoli Rabe Over Toast.” (Fancy.) We shortened it to “beans on toast” to be a little more internet-friendly…and, because beans on toast is a thing! It’s a British dish that’s basically baked beans served over toast. This version, though: is like beans on toast with a glam makeover. Here are a few notes about serving it:

  • Cook the beans with broccoli rabe. Broccoli rabe is a green with a pretty bitter flavor: but it works well here with the savory beans. If you can’t find it in the store, try broccolini (our fave!), broccoli or Tuscan kale, which will have a sweeter flavor.
  • Use an artisan-style loaf for the toast. Not any old bread will do. Find an artisan-style bread loaf (or try our sourdough, Dutch oven bread, or artisan bread).
  • Spoon the broth and beans onto the toast. It will seem like there’s a lot of broth: but that’s what’s intended! Spoon on the beans first, then the broth. It softens the toast into a chewy, delightful texture.
  • Top with aged Parmesan cheese (or Pecorino Romano). Wow, is this good topped with some aged Parmesan or Pecorino Romano cheese and a drizzle of olive oil! (If you eat fully vegan, please weigh in if you know of a good vegan Parm.)
Beans on toast

About the book: Cool Beans

Cool Beans is all about demystifying the humble bean: since it may be the key to the future of food! It’s full of 125 incredible flavor-packed recipes and ideas for eating the world’s most versatile plant-based protein. Alex and I give it a hearty 2 thumbs up!

Alex and I know author Joe Yonan through Voraciously: Plant Powered, our project with Washington Post Food. Joe is the Food and Dining Editor at The Washington Post and was incredible to work with. We’ve always been admirers of Joe’s work, but with this book he’s truly outdone himself! It’s an incredible resource that we’ll be turning to again and again. Hats off, Joe!

Get it: Cool Beans by Joe Yonan

This white beans on toast recipe is…

Vegetarian. For vegan, plant-based, and dairy-free, use vegan Parmesan or top with another savory element like capers.

Print
Beans on toast

White Beans on Toast


1 Star2 Stars3 Stars4 Stars5 Stars (5 votes, average: 5.00 out of 5)

  • Author: Sonja Overhiser
  • Prep Time: 10 minutes
  • Cook Time: 1 hour 15 minutes
  • Total Time: 1 hour 25 minutes
  • Yield: 6
  • Diet: Vegetarian

Description

Serving beans on toast makes them a meal! This simple, sophisticated recipe pairs white beans with garlic, broccoli rabe, and Parmesan cheese.


Ingredients

  • 2 cups dried great Northern beans (may substitute navy, cannellini, or other white
  • beans), soaked overnight and drained*
  • Water
  • 1 onion, peeled and studded with 12 whole cloves
  • 2 large carrots
  • 1 (3 by 5-inch) strip kombu (dried seaweed)
  • 3 bay leaves
  • 3 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil
  • 1 large bunch of broccoli rabe, cut into 1-inch pieces (or substitute 3 to 4 cups broccolini or broccoli florets or roughly chopped Tuscan kale)
  • 6 garlic cloves, finely chopped
  • 1 teaspoon kosher salt, plus more to taste
  • 1/4 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper
  • 6 thick slices rustic sourdough bread, lightly toasted
  • 1 tablespoon chile oil (optional)
  • 1/4 cup vegan or traditional Parmesan, grated or shaved

Instructions

  1. Make sure to soak your beans overnight (or at least 4 hours), covered in room temperature water.
  2. Combine the beans in a large pot with enough water to cover by 2 inches. Add the onion, carrots, kombu, and bay leaves, turn the heat to medium-high, and bring the beans to a boil. Let then boil for 5 minutes, then reduce the heat so the beans are at a bare simmer, cover, and cook until the beans are very tender, about 1 hour. (Alternatively, you can cook the beans, water, and aromatic vegetables in a stovetop or electric pressure cooker: Bring to high pressure and cook for 17 minutes if using a stovetop model or 20 minutes for electric. Let the pressure release naturally, then open.)
  3. Discard the onion, carrots, kombu, and bay leaves and strain the beans, reserving all of the cooking liquid.
  4. In a deep skillet, heat the olive oil over medium heat until it shimmers. Stir in the broccoli rabe and sauté until very tender, about 8 minutes. Stir in the garlic and cook until it starts to soften, about 2 minutes. Stir in the drained beans, 1 1/2 cups of the reserved cooking liquid, and the salt. Cook just until the beans are hot and the flavors have melded, 2 to 3 minutes. Stir in the pepper, taste, and add more salt if needed. (Here we added about 3/4 teaspoon extra salt until the flavor popped.)
  5. Divide the toast among shallow serving bowls. Drizzle with the chile oil, if desired, and spoon the bean mixture and broth on top of the toast (use the broth as a sauce to flavor the toast). Finish with the Parm and serve hot.

Notes

*This recipe is best when made with dried beans. But if you’d like to use canned, use 4 cans Great Northern or other white beans, drained and rinsed and start with Step 3.

  • Category: Main Dish
  • Method: Boiled
  • Cuisine: Vegetarian

Keywords: Beans on toast

A Couple Cooks - Healthy, Whole Food, & Vegetarian Recipes

White Beans with Mushrooms and Marinara

The other day I was scrolling through Pinterest and an image of some cheesy, tomatoey gnocchi made me stop in my tracks and drool a little. But the funny part is that at first I thought the gnocchi were white beans. Long story short, I eventually realized that they were gnocchi, but was still stuck […]

The post White Beans with Mushrooms and Marinara appeared first on Budget Bytes.

The other day I was scrolling through Pinterest and an image of some cheesy, tomatoey gnocchi made me stop in my tracks and drool a little. But the funny part is that at first I thought the gnocchi were white beans. Long story short, I eventually realized that they were gnocchi, but was still stuck on this idea of white beans baked with marinara and cheese. I loved the idea of swapping gnocchi with high fiber beans, so I had to give it a shot. These White Beans with Mushrooms and Marinara lived up to everything I would hoping they would be, and this recipe has quite a bit of potential for customization, so I can’t wait to share it with you!

Cheesy White Beans with Mushrooms and Marinara

Close up overhead view of a skillet full of white beans with mushrooms and marinara and a wooden spoon scooping some out.

What Kind of White Beans Should I Use?

I used large butter beans for this recipe because they’re huge and look similar to gnocchi. If you don’t like butter beans or can’t find them, cannellini beans are a good second choice because they are creamy in flavor, still slightly larger, and they hold their shape well. And while you can use navy beans, they’re my last choice for this dish because they’re small and they tend to break down easily, so you won’t get as good of a texture in the final dish.

Can I Add Meat?

Sure! I designed this one to be a filling vegetarian dish, but this recipe easily accommodates the addition of meat. My first choice would be Italian sausage (browned in the skillet before the mushrooms), but pepperoni would also be pretty amazing. You can either crisp up the pepperoni in the skillet before adding the mushrooms, or chop up the pepperoni and stir them in with the sauce.

What Other Vegetables can I Add?

If you’re not into mushrooms or are just looking for other vegetables to add in addition to the mushrooms, there are definitely some great options. Zucchini would match really well with these flavors, as would spinach. For zucchini, I suggest slicing and sautéing after the mushrooms. For spinach, stir it in after the sauce has heated through, just until it is wilted. Eggplant would also be amazing, just dice and sauté after the mushrooms.

How to Serve White Beans with Mushrooms and Marinara

You’ll want to sop up every drop of that marinara, so I suggest serving this dish with a side of Garlic Bread. Also, because garlic bread is always a good idea. You can also spoon this mixture over something like zoodles, a halved roasted eggplant, or, if you’re not trying to avoid pasta, just serve it over a bed of good ol’ pasta.

 

Overhead view of the baked skillet full of white beans with mushrooms and marinara

 

White Beans with Mushrooms and Marinara

White beans make a fiber-filled swap for gnocchi in this cheesy, indulgent skillet full of white beans, mushrooms, and marinara.

  • 8 oz. mushrooms ($2.29)
  • 2 Tbsp olive oil ($0.32)
  • 1 pinch salt and pepper ($0.05)
  • 2 cloves garlic ($0.16)
  • 2 cups marinara (or more to your liking) ($1.00)
  • 2 15oz. cans butter beans ($2.00)
  • 1/2 tsp dried basil ($0.05)
  • 1 pinch crushed red pepper ($0.02)
  • 4 oz. mozzarella ($0.65)
  1. Preheat the oven to 400ºF. Wash and slice the mushrooms. Add the mushrooms, olive oil, and a pinch of salt and pepper to a deep skillet. Sauté the mushrooms until they have wilted and all the moisture in the skillet has evaporated.

  2. While the mushrooms are sautéing, mince the garlic, drain and rinse the butter beans. Add the garlic to the skillet with the mushrooms and sauté for 2 minutes more.

  3. Add the rinsed butter beans, marinara, basil, and red pepper to the skillet. Stir everything to combine, then allow it to heat through, stirring occasionally.

  4. While the skillet is heating through, shred the mozzarella. Top the skillet with the mozzarella, then cover the skillet with foil. Transfer the skillet to the oven* and bake for 5-7 minutes, or until the cheese is melted.

  5. Once the cheese has melted, remove the foil, switch the oven to broil, and broil the skillet for a few minutes more to brown the cheese (watch closely, as browning can happen quickly with the broiler). Serve hot, with garlic bread for dipping!

*If you don’t have an oven safe skillet, simply transfer the beans, mushrooms, and marinara to a casserole dish before baking with the cheese.

Scroll down for the step by step photos!

Close up of a piece of garlic bread dipped in white beans with mushrooms and marinara

How to make White Beans with Mushrooms and Marinara – Step by Step Photos

Sliced Mushrooms

Preheat the oven to 400ºF. Wash and slice 8oz. mushrooms.

Sautéed mushrooms and garlic

Add the sliced mushrooms to a deep skillet with 2 Tbsp olive oil and a pinch of salt and pepper. Sauté over medium until the mushrooms are wilted and the moisture has evaporated out of the skillet. While the mushrooms are sautéing, mince 2 cloves of garlic, then add them to the skillet and sauté for about 2 minutes more.

Add beans and marinara to the skillet

Rinse and drain two cans of butter beans, then add them to the skillet with 2 cups marinara (or more if you want it to be slightly saucier). Stir to combine.

Add herbs to marinara

I like to amp up my jarred marinara a bit, so also add 1/2 tsp dried basil and a pinch of crushed red pepper. Stir them into the sauce, then allow the skillet to heat through, stirring occasionally (5 minutes).

Add shredded mozzarella to the skillet

Shred 4 oz. of mozzarella, then sprinkle it on top of the skillet. (If you don’t have an oven safe skillet, transfer the beans and marinara to a casserole dish first.)

Melted mozzarella in skillet covered with foil.

Cover the skillet with foil, then transfer to the preheated oven, and bake for 5-7 minutes, or until the cheese is melted.

Broiled cheese on skillet

Remove the foil from the skillet, switch the oven from bake to broil, then broil a few minutes more to brown the cheese. Watch the skillet closely, as broiling can brown the cheese very quickly. (I also topped with a little chopped parsley for color, but it’s not needed for flavor).

Finished White Beans with Mushrooms and Marinara, a piece of garlic bread dipped in the side

Serve hot with garlic bread for dipping, over roasted vegetables, or over pasta.

The post White Beans with Mushrooms and Marinara appeared first on Budget Bytes.

Slow Cooker White Chicken Chili

This Slow Cooker White Chicken Chili is the perfect example of why people love slow cookers so much. You literally just dump everything in the slow cooker, give it a quick stir, then turn it on and walk away. When you come back you have this hearty white bean chicken chili that’s ready for topping […]

The post Slow Cooker White Chicken Chili appeared first on Budget Bytes.

This Slow Cooker White Chicken Chili is the perfect example of why people love slow cookers so much. You literally just dump everything in the slow cooker, give it a quick stir, then turn it on and walk away. When you come back you have this hearty white bean chicken chili that’s ready for topping with creamy cheese and diving in with some tortilla chips. And when the sky is dark, the air is cold, and you’ve got the winter blues, easy dinners like this are a total life saver!

Originally posted 1-2-2015, updated 2-9-2020.

Crock Pot White Chicken Chili

Two bowls of slow cooker white chicken chili topped with cheese and blue tortilla chips on the side

See this recipe used in my weekly meal prep.

Does White Chicken Chili Have Chili Powder?

Nope! Unlike traditional red chili, this “white” chili does not contain chili powder. It’s flavored using salsa verde, cumin, and oregano. This chili gets its name from the white beans used in place of the red kidney beans used in red chili.

Is This Chili Spicy?

This chili is a “medium” level spicy. If you want to make the chili more mild, skip the jalapeño and cayenne pepper listed in the ingredients, and make sure to use a mild salsa verde.

What Size Slow Cooker do I Need?

You can make this in a 3-4 quart slow cooker, or double the recipe for a 5-7 qt slow cooker and feed a crowd. I have a 5 quart slow cooker (affiliate link) and the recipe, as listed below, filled it about half way.

Can This White Chicken Chili be Frozen?

Yes, this chili freezes very well! As always, make sure to chill your chili completely in the refrigerator first, before transferring to the freezer for long term storage. I prefer to freeze all my leftovers in single portions so they can be reheated one by one whenever I get hungry.

Chili Topping Ideas

I highly suggest topping this chili with something creamy, like the Monterrey jack cheese listed in the ingredients below, some sour cream, or avocado. The creamy flavor is the perfect contrast to the salsa verde. You can also top with some green onion, sliced jalapeño, cilantro, pico de gallo, crumbled cornbread, or pickled red onions.

Overhead view of Slow Cooker White Chicken Chili in the slow cooker

 

Easy Slow Cooker White Chicken Chili

The slow cooker does all the work with this easy, flavorful, and healthy white chicken chili. This "dump and go" dinner will become a family favorite!

  • 1 yellow onion ($0.32)
  • 2 cloves garlic ($0.16)
  • 1 jalapeño (optional) ($0.11)
  • 1 boneless skinless chicken breast (about 3/4 lb.) ($3.62)
  • 1 16 oz. jar salsa verde ($2.59)
  • 2 15 oz. cans cannellini beans ($0.98)
  • 1 15 oz. can pinto beans ($0.89)
  • 1 Tbsp ground cumin ($0.30)
  • 1 tsp dried oregano ($0.10)
  • ¼ tsp cayenne pepper ($0.02)
  • ¼ tsp freshly ground black pepper ($0.03)
  • 2 cups chicken broth ($0.26)
  • 4 oz Monterrey Jack cheese, shredded ($0.85)
  1. Dice the onion and mince the garlic. Slice the jalapeńo lengthwise, scrape out the seeds with a spoon, then dice. Place the onion, garlic, jalapeño, and chicken breast in the bottom of a slow cooker.
  2. Drain and rinse the cannellini beans and pinto beans, then add them to the slow cooker, along with the cumin, oregano, cayenne, and freshly ground black pepper. Pour the salsa over top.

  3. Pour two cups of chicken broth over the contents in the cooker and then give everything a brief stir. Place the lid on the slow cooker and cook on high for four hours, or on low for eight hours.

  4. After four hours on high, or eight hours on low, carefully remove the chicken breast from the slow cooker and use two forks to shred the meat. Return the meat to the slow cooker. Stir the chili, slightly mashing the beans with the back of the spoon as you stir. The mashed beans will help thicken the chili.

  5. Serve the chili topped with shredded Monterrey Jack cheese. Other optional toppings include fresh cilantro, diced avocado, freshly squeeze lime, or tortilla chips.

Scroll down for the step by step photos!

Close up overhead view of a bowl full of slow cooker white chicken chili

How to Make Slow Cooker White Chicken Chili – Step by Step Photos

Onion, garlic, jalapeño, and chicken breast in the slow cooker

Dice one yellow onion and mince two cloves of garlic. Slice the jalapeño in half, scrape out the seeds, then dice the remaining pepper. Add the onion, garlic, jalapeño, and chicken breast to the slow cooker.

Beans and spices added to slow cooker

Drain and rinse two 15oz. cans of cannellini beans and one 15oz. can of pinto beans. Add the drained beans to the slow cooker along with 1 Tbsp cumin, 1 tsp oregano, ¼ tsp cayenne, and some freshly cracked black pepper.

Salsa verde being poured into the slow cooker

Pour one 16oz. jar of salsa verde into the slow cooker (I’ve used many brands for this recipe in the past, the one in the photo is Kroger’s Private Selectrion brand).

Chicken broth being poured into the slow cooker

Pour two cups of chicken broth into the slow cooker.

Briefly stir the slow cooker

Briefly stir the contents of the slow cooker to distribute the spices. Place a lid on top and cook on high for four hours, or low for eight hours.

Chicken breast being removed from slow cooker with tongs

After cooking on high for four hours, or on low for eight hours, remove the chicken breast to a clean cutting board to shred (or you can shred directly in the pot with two forks).

Shredded chicken on cutting board

Shred the chicken using two forks.

Chicken returned to slow cooker

Return the shredded chicken to the slow cooker and stir to combine. Use the back of a spoon to smash some of the beans agains the side of the pot. The smashed beans will help thicken the chili.

A spoonful of white chicken chili being lifted out of the bowl, blue corn chips in the background

Top with your favorite ingredients and enjoy!

The post Slow Cooker White Chicken Chili appeared first on Budget Bytes.

1-Pot Tuscan-Style Beef & Lentil Soup

If you’re looking for a hearty, 1-pot meal to warm up with this winter, this is it.
I recently got an intense craving for a meaty, tomatoey soup with lentils and greens and had to have it. This was the (incredibly delicious) result.
We hope you …

1-Pot Tuscan-Style Beef & Lentil Soup

If you’re looking for a hearty, 1-pot meal to warm up with this winter, this is it.

I recently got an intense craving for a meaty, tomatoey soup with lentils and greens and had to have it. This was the (incredibly delicious) result.

We hope you love it as much as we do. It’s been on repeat in our kitchen for the last several months!

1-Pot Tuscan-Style Beef & Lentil Soup from Minimalist Baker →

Pasta e Fagioli (Italian Pasta and Beans)

The Italians have graced us with countless delicious recipes. This is indisputable! I’ve loved pizza and spaghetti for as long as I can remember, of course, but…

The post Pasta e Fagioli (Italian Pasta and Beans) appeared first on Cookie and Kate.

best pasta e fagioli recipe

The Italians have graced us with countless delicious recipes. This is indisputable! I’ve loved pizza and spaghetti for as long as I can remember, of course, but I’ve only recently discovered pasta e fagioli.

Pasta e fagioli translates to “pasta and beans.” Pasta and beans may not sound terribly enticing (unless you’re me), but I assure you that this Italian stew is truly irresistible.

Lots of aromatics, crushed tomatoes, fresh parsley and Tuscan kale turn pasta and beans into a hearty meal-in-a-bowl situation. I can’t claim that this recipe is 100 percent authentic, but it’s the best I can do.

pasta e fagioli ingredients

If you appreciate homemade minestrone soup, marinara, lasagna or baked ziti, I think you’ll love this stew. It’ll warm you right up on cold days, and tastes even better the next day.

I designed this pasta e fagioli recipe to make use of canned beans, so this stew is ready in about an hour! I bet you have most of the ingredients in your kitchen already. It’s an excellent candidate for a relaxed weeknight.

Continue to the recipe...

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Easy Minestrone Soup

Minestrone soup is a colorful Italian soup full of hearty vegetables and pasta! This recipe is an easy plant based dinner or lunch recipe. Dinnertime can be difficult. So it’s often that Alex and I turn to this solution: soup! It’s the best way we’ve found to pack in healthy vegetables in a delicious and easy way. We have lots of vegetarian and vegan soup recipes here on A Couple Cooks, but we realized we were missing a classic: minestrone! This one is full of colorful veggies, a hearty broth and pasta spirals. It’s so satisfying: great as an easy dinner with crusty bread. And with a dollop of pesto…it’s damn good. Got a pressure cooker? Go to our Instant Pot Minestrone. What’s in minestrone soup? Minestrone soup is a thick Italian soup that’s full of chunky vegetables and a hearty broth. Often minestrone includes pasta or rice. It was originally intended as a way to use up whatever veggies you have on hand. In our minestrone soup we’ve gone pretty classic, using the veggies you’ll most often see if you order a minestrone soup at a restaurant or buy it in a can. Here’s what’s in it: Tomatoes. Both […]

A Couple Cooks – Healthy, Whole Food, & Vegetarian Recipes

Minestrone soup is a colorful Italian soup full of hearty vegetables and pasta! This recipe is an easy plant based dinner or lunch recipe.

Minestrone soup

Dinnertime can be difficult. So it’s often that Alex and I turn to this solution: soup! It’s the best way we’ve found to pack in healthy vegetables in a delicious and easy way. We have lots of vegetarian and vegan soup recipes here on A Couple Cooks, but we realized we were missing a classic: minestrone! This one is full of colorful veggies, a hearty broth and pasta spirals. It’s so satisfying: great as an easy dinner with crusty bread. And with a dollop of pesto…it’s damn good.

Got a pressure cooker? Go to our Instant Pot Minestrone.

Minestrone soup

What’s in minestrone soup?

Minestrone soup is a thick Italian soup that’s full of chunky vegetables and a hearty broth. Often minestrone includes pasta or rice. It was originally intended as a way to use up whatever veggies you have on hand. In our minestrone soup we’ve gone pretty classic, using the veggies you’ll most often see if you order a minestrone soup at a restaurant or buy it in a can. Here’s what’s in it:

  • Tomatoes. Both fire roasted diced tomatoes and tomato paste are used here, to go big on the tomato flavor. Fire roasted tomatoes are uniquely sweet right out of the can: if you can’t find them, use the best quality tomatoes you can find.
  • Onion, carrot and celery. These aromatic veggies are often used together to flavor foods; in Italian they’re called soffritto (and in French it’s called mirepoix).
  • Zucchini, or 1 to 2 cups other veggies. Here’s where you can get creative: use 1 to 2 cups of other veggies you have onhand (like green beans, broccoli, etc).
  • White beans. Cannellini beans add a good pop of plant based protein.
  • Pasta. Pasta is traditional in minestrone: you can use any short pasta you like: fussili, spirali, radiatore, orechiette, ditali, farfalle, rotini, gemelli, etc.
Minestrone soup

Garnish with all the toppings!

What toppings go with minestrone soup? In some parts of Italy it’s traditional to serve minestrone in a special way. Serve this soup with pesto and it’s called Minestrone alla genovese. In Italian this means “minestrone soup from Genoa,” the capital of the region of Liguria Italy and where all the great pesto comes from! But you don’t have to use pesto: here are a few different ways to garnish minestrone:

  • With fresh parsley. Minestrone is often traditionally served with fresh parsley, which adds a freshness and a bright green color.
  • With Parmesan or Pecorino Romano cheese. You’ll often see Italian soups garnished with an aged cheese. Use Pecorino Romano to step it up, since it’s sharper and has an even more savory flavor.
  • With pesto! Serve it alla genovese and add a dollop of pesto, which adds a pop of irresistible flavor. Use your favorite storebought pesto, or try our homemade basil pesto or vegan pesto.
Kale salad

Make it a meal: what to serve with minestrone soup!

Once you’ve garnished this minestrone soup, how to serve it? To us, it’s perfect accompanied by a salad with an Italian vibe. Here are a few salads that fit the bill:

  • Easy Arugula Salad Baby arugula, lemon and Parmesan combine to make a zingy Italian salad (you don’t even need to make a dressing!).
  • Favorite Chopped Salad This one will amaze everyone around the table! Homemade Italian dressing, crisp veggies and Parmesan cheese combine into one extraordinary salad.
  • The BEST Kale Salad This kale salad is all Italian, tossed a lemon garlic vinaigrette and Pecorino shavings.
Easy minestrone recipe

More Italian soup recipes

As you may have guessed, Alex and I love Italian cuisine! We traveled together to Rome, Naples, Amalfi Coast and Tellaro and picked up all sorts of food inspiration there. Traditional Italian pizza is our obsession (like this Margherita!), but soups fit more into our everyday way of eating.

If you like this minestrone soup, here are a few more Italian soup recipes you might enjoy:

This minestrone soup recipe is…

Vegetarian, plant-based, dairy-free, and vegan. For gluten-free, use gluten-free or legume pasta.

Print
Instant Pot minestrone soup

Easy Minestrone Soup


1 Star2 Stars3 Stars4 Stars5 Stars (5 votes, average: 5.00 out of 5)

  • Author: Sonja Overhiser
  • Prep Time: 15 minutes
  • Cook Time: 25 minutes
  • Total Time: 40 minutes
  • Yield: 4 to 6

Description

Minestrone soup is a colorful Italian soup full of hearty vegetables and pasta! This recipe is an easy plant based dinner or lunch recipe.


Ingredients

  • 1 medium onion (or leek)
  • 2 medium carrots
  • 1 celery stalk
  • 5 garlic cloves
  • 1 small zucchini squash (or 1 to 2 cups of other chopped vegetables)
  • 1/4 cup olive oil
  • 2 tablespoons tomato paste
  • 1 quart vegetable broth
  • 28-ounce can diced fire roasted tomatoes
  • 1 cup water
  • 1 bay leaf
  • 1 15-ounce can cannellini beans
  • 1/2 teaspoon each dried oregano and thyme
  • 1 1/4 teaspoon kosher salt, divided
  • 3/4 cup pasta shells or spirals (gluten-free or legume pasta if necessary)
  • 3 cups baby kale (or spinach or other chopped greens)
  • Fresh ground black pepper
  • Fresh parsley, for garnish
  • Optional topping: Parmesan cheese, basil pesto or vegan pesto

Instructions

  1. Prep the vegetables: Peel and small dice the onion and carrots. Small dice the celery. Mince the garlic. Small dice the zucchini.
  2. In a large pot or Dutch oven, heat the olive oil over medium high heat. Add the onion, carrots, celery and tomato paste, and cook for 5 to 6 minutes until the onions are just translucent. Add the garlic and cook for 1 minute.
  3. Add the vegetable broth, tomatoes and juices, water, zucchini, bay leaf, white beans, oregano, thyme, and 1 teaspoon kosher salt. Bring it to a simmer, then cook 10 minutes on medium low.
  4. Add the pasta and cook until pasta is just al dente, about 8 to 10 minutes. Turn off the heat and stir in the baby greens for a few seconds until wilted. (If you’re using tougher greens like mature kale, chop them and add them in the last 5 minutes of the cook time.)
  5. Remove the bay leaf. Add the remaining 1/4 teaspoon kosher salt. Taste and add fresh ground black pepper and more kosher salt to taste. Garnish with chopped parsley (or optionally add Parmesan cheese shavings or basil pesto or vegan pesto).

  • Category: Main Dish
  • Method: Stovetop
  • Cuisine: Italian

Keywords: Minestrone Soup, Italian Soup, Italian Recipes, Easy Minestrone

A Couple Cooks - Healthy, Whole Food, & Vegetarian Recipes

1-Pot Chicken Soup with White Beans & Kale

If you’ve ever wondered how to make a nourishing chicken soup for those days when nothing else sounds good, when you’re under the weather, or when you’ve moved out and your mom doesn’t cook for you anymore — this is the soup for…

1-Pot Chicken Soup with White Beans & Kale

If you’ve ever wondered how to make a nourishing chicken soup for those days when nothing else sounds good, when you’re under the weather, or when you’ve moved out and your mom doesn’t cook for you anymore — this is the soup for you.

Behold: The easiest, tastiest chicken soup recipe on the block, complete with white beans and kale. Mom would be so proud! Let’s do this.

This recipe is simple, requiring just 1 pot, 8 ingredients, and 30 minutes to make.

1-Pot Chicken Soup with White Beans & Kale from Minimalist Baker →

Tuscan Tomato Bean Soup with Kale.

This tuscan tomato bread soup is so good I could cry. Forgive me because I’m putting bread IN your soup. Just when I thought that I couldn’t love tomato soup more… oh my gosh. YOU GUYS. This tomato bread soup is the coziest soup I have ever eaten. It’s super hearty. It’s packed with flavor. […]

The post Tuscan Tomato Bean Soup with Kale. appeared first on How Sweet Eats.

This tuscan tomato bread soup is so good I could cry.

This tuscan tomato bread soup is super hearty, satisfying and delicious! Leftovers are a hit and you will find yourself craving this in the cooler months.

Forgive me because I’m putting bread IN your soup.

Just when I thought that I couldn’t love tomato soup more… oh my gosh.

tomato bread soup

YOU GUYS.

This tomato bread soup is the coziest soup I have ever eaten. It’s super hearty. It’s packed with flavor. And it’s ridiculously satisfying.

And it’s not like I’m saying you SHOULDN’T make a grilled cheese with this, but what I’m saying is… you don’t even need it.

That means a lot coming from me. I’m like the grilled cheese queen. I live for them. So this is CRAZY.

This tuscan tomato bread soup is super hearty, satisfying and delicious! Leftovers are a hit and you will find yourself craving this in the cooler months.

A few years ago I made a tortilla soup that is actually thickened by tortillas. It remains one of my favorite recipes. So when I saw a recipe like this, I knew I had to try. 

You add the bread directly to the soup and simmer it until it thickens the entire pot. It’s so… rich. Without any added cream or milk or cheese. 

Sure, these IS some cheese (you add a parmesan rind – that’s my favorite thing ever!) and of course, the bread. But it’s such a soul-warming recipe, one that reheats fabulously and all around tastes SO GOOD that you won’t know what to do with yourself.

This tuscan tomato bread soup is super hearty, satisfying and delicious! Leftovers are a hit and you will find yourself craving this in the cooler months.

I’ll say it right now – Eddie is not a tomato soup person. You probably already know this, if only because the guy you’ve been reading about for a decade, the guy who had framed photos of WWE wrestlers hanging on his walls when I met him, has never been a serious soup lover. And I’ve all but skewered him here for it. 

He loves a hearty, meaty chili or even chicken noodle soup – that’s about it.

HOWEVER!!

This passed the Eddie test. It is so, SO hearty for a tomato soup. Honestly it feels more like a bean soup that a tomato soup, that is how packed it is! But the flavor is 100% tomato based and boy oh boy is it fantastic.

This tuscan tomato bread soup is super hearty, satisfying and delicious! Leftovers are a hit and you will find yourself craving this in the cooler months.

So here’s the deal.

You want to use a really good non-seedy, non-grainy bread! That was tricky for me because I actually only like grainy, seedy breads. I had to go out and find a great crusty italian loaf that would work here. 

It’s amazing how the bread melts and dissolves into the soup, while also leaving just the slightest reminder that it is, in fact, bread that is doing the thickening. You know how occasionally you dunk a sandwich into soup, and a piece of the bread gets lost at the bottom until you’re almost finished, and you slurp it up with that last spoonful?

This is kind of like that, but in a really good way. Makes me so happy!

This tuscan tomato bread soup is super hearty, satisfying and delicious! Leftovers are a hit and you will find yourself craving this in the cooler months.

I’ve always loved the tradition of tomato soup with grilled cheese on Halloween night before trick or treating. This is this year’s contribution!

If you’re looking for more inspo, this is my most favorite ever tomato soup in shooter form with grilled cheese sticks. I’ve also made pumpkin bisque with grilled cheese croutons. And tomato cream pasta with grilled cheese crumbs! Oh yes.

Now we can have it all in one bowl.

This tuscan tomato bread soup is super hearty, satisfying and delicious! Leftovers are a hit and you will find yourself craving this in the cooler months.

Tuscan Tomato Bread Soup

Tuscan Tomato Bean Soup with Kale

This tuscan tomato bread soup is super hearty, satisfying and delicious! Leftovers are a hit and you will find yourself craving this in the cooler months.

  • 1 pound dry white beans (navy, cannellini, etc) (, soaked overnight)
  • 1 tablespoon unsalted butter
  • 1 tablespoon olive oil
  • 1 sweet onion, (diced)
  • 4 garlic cloves, (minced)
  • ½ teaspoon salt
  • ½ teaspoon freshly cracked pepper
  • ¼ teaspoon crushed red pepper flakes
  • ¾ cup chopped or sliced carrots
  • 2 tablespoons tomato paste
  • 2 14 ounce cans fire roasted diced tomatoes
  • 4 cups vegetable stock
  • 2 ½ cups crusty italian bread chunks
  • ½ cup freshly grated parmesan cheese, (plus more for topping)
  • 1 parmesan cheese rind
  • 1 head tuscan kale, (torn from stems and coarsely chopped)
  1. To soak the beans overnight, place them in a large bowl or pot and cover them with a few inches of water. Drain the beans in the morning.
  2. Heat a large pot over medium heat and add the butter and olive oil. Stir in the onion, garlic, salt, pepper and pepper flakes. Cook until the onions soften, about 5 minutes.
  3. Stir in the carrots and cook for 5 minutes more. Stir in the tomato paste, stirring to coat all the vegetables in the pot.
  4. Add the diced tomatoes and vegetable stock. Add the bread in chunks. Stir in the beans, parmesan cheese and parmesan rind. Bring the mixture to a boil, then reduce it to a simmer and cover it. Cook for 30 to 40 minutes, stirring occasionally to make sure nothing is sticking to the bottom. If it is, reduce the heat!
  5. When the soup is finished, the bread will have mostly disintegrated into the soup. You can taste and season the soup here if you wish – add more salt and pepper if it doesn’t seem to have enough flavor. This step is important! All canned tomatoes can be different in salt quantities, so be sure to taste and adjust the flavor to your linking.
  6. 5 to 10 minutes before serving, stir in the kale. I love that the kale has a crisp chew and texture to it. If you prefer it to be softer and more wilted, you can add it in earlier or cook the soup a bit longer. The kale gets softer as it sits.
  7. Serve the soup with lots of grated parmesan for topping.

slightly adapted from real simple

This tuscan tomato bread soup is super hearty, satisfying and delicious! Leftovers are a hit and you will find yourself craving this in the cooler months.

Craving a bite of this so badly.

The post Tuscan Tomato Bean Soup with Kale. appeared first on How Sweet Eats.