Oatmeal Zucchini Cookies

Oatmeal Zucchini Cookies with chocolate chips and coconut are one of my all-time favorite cookies! They are perfect during the summer months when zucchini is in season, but we make them year-round because they are SO good! Zucchini…in Cookies? Is…

Oatmeal Zucchini Cookies with chocolate chips and coconut are one of my all-time favorite cookies! They are perfect during the summer months when zucchini is in season, but we make them year-round because they are SO good! Zucchini…in Cookies? Is your garden zucchini staring you down? Don’t be scared, we are here to help! We…

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No-Knead Focaccia

Once you try focaccia, you’ll never go back to plain bread! This hearty No-Knead Focaccia is coated in olive oil and herbs, making every bite full of delicious flavor. And the best part? It only takes about 5 minutes of hands-on work to make an amazing loaf. This delicious bread pretty much makes itself! Originally […]

The post No-Knead Focaccia appeared first on Budget Bytes.

Once you try focaccia, you’ll never go back to plain bread! This hearty No-Knead Focaccia is coated in olive oil and herbs, making every bite full of delicious flavor. And the best part? It only takes about 5 minutes of hands-on work to make an amazing loaf. This delicious bread pretty much makes itself!

Originally published 4-30-2011, updated 5-28-2020.

 A stack of focaccia slices, sides visible showing off bubbles

How Does No-Knead Bread Work?

When making regular bread, you have to use a lot of elbow grease kneading the dough to make the gluten strands line up and form a sort of matrix that gives the dough strength and texture. With no-knead bread, the dough is allowed to ferment overnight. During fermentation enzymes break down the gluten in a process called autolysis, which makes it easier for them to untangle, line up, and form the matrix that usually takes a lot of kneading to form. 

An added bonus is that overnight fermentation adds a lot of flavor to the bread. AND, since the yeast has so much time to grow and multiply, you only need to use ¼ tsp yeast, compared to about 2 tsp for a normal loaf of bread! Win-win!

What Kind of Yeast Can I Use?

This no-knead style bread is a little unique because the yeast is combined with dry flour, instead of being mixed with water and allowed to “proof” first. Because it’s not proofed first, you’ll need a specific kind of yeast—instant yeast or bread machine yeast. These types of yeast do not need to be “woken up” in warm water before being added to bread dough.

What Do You Serve With Focaccia?

Focaccia is such a versatile bread! It makes a great side dish with just about any meal, but I think it’s particularly nice with soups and stews. It’s hearty texture makes it great for dipping, dunking, and sopping up sauces, stews, and soups. It’s also fantastic for sandwiches, especially pressed sandwiches like paninis. You can also use this bread to make pizzas or flatbreads. Simply top it with your favorite cheese, meat, or vegetables and bake again until the cheese is melted and bubbly.

Freeze the Extras!

This makes a BIG batch of focaccia bread, so I highly suggest freezing the leftovers. Most bread, including focaccia, freeze beautifully, so you can have homemade bread with any meal without a lot of work. To freeze the focaccia, simply let it cool completely until it is room temperature, cut it into slices (whichever size or shape you prefer), then place it in a gallon-sized freezer bag. The frozen no-knead focaccia thaws quickly at room temperature.

Can I Use Whole Wheat Flour?

Yes, you can substitute some of the all-purpose flour for whole wheat. Using all whole-wheat flour generally creates a very heavy and dense bread, so I highly suggest using only some, up to 50%, whole wheat flour. You may need to use slightly more water, as whole wheat flour absorbs more moisture than all-purpose flour.

A hand holding a slice of focaccia so you can see the bubbles in the side

 
A stack of no knead focaccia slices viewed from the side

No-knead Focaccia Bread

Fresh, hearty focaccia bread is incredibly simple to make with this no-knead method. It's perfect for sandwiches or dunking into soups and stews. 
Total Cost $1.31 recipe / $0.11 serving
Prep Time 16 hours
Cook Time 20 minutes
Total Time 16 hours 20 minutes
Servings 12 squares
Calories 177.83kcal
Author Beth - Budget Bytes

Ingredients

  • 4 cups all-purpose flour $0.61
  • 1/4 tsp instant yeast $0.02
  • 1 1/2 tsp salt $0.03
  • 2 cups water $0.00
  • 2 Tbsp olive oil, divided $0.32
  • 2 Tbsp cornmeal $0.03
  • 1 Tbsp Italian seasoning $0.30

Instructions

  • The night before, combine the flour, salt and yeast in a bowl. Stir until everything is evenly combined. Add the water and stir until it forms one cohesive, sticky, shaggy ball of dough with no dry flour left on the bottom of the bowl. If there is still dry flour in bowl, add a little water (1-2 Tbsp) until the dough comes together (scroll down to the step by step photos for examples). Loosely cover the bowl and let sit at room temperature for 12-18 hours.
  • The next day the dough will be wet, bubbly, and very fluffy. Dust the top of the dough with some flour, then scrape the dough from the sides of the bowl. Turn the dough over on itself a few times until it forms a ball in the center of the bowl.
  • Line a baking sheet with foil then drizzle with 1 Tbsp olive oil. Spread the oil to coat the surface of the foil, then sprinkle cornmeal on top of the oil.
  • Transfer the dough to the baking sheet. Stretch and pat the dough out into a large rectangle. You may need to dust your hands with flour throughout this process to keep the dough from sticking.
  • Drizzle olive oil over the surface of the dough and use a soft brush to spread it evenly over the surface. Sprinkle the Italian seasoning (or any type of herbs) over top. Let the dough rise for another hour.
  • Preheat the oven to 425ºF. Using your fingers, press dimples into the risen dough. Bake the focaccia for 20-25 minutes in the preheated oven or until the surface is golden brown. After removing from the oven, allow the focaccia to cool before slicing and serving.

Nutrition

Serving: 1sqaure | Calories: 177.83kcal | Carbohydrates: 33.13g | Protein: 4.45g | Fat: 2.69g | Sodium: 356.03mg | Fiber: 1.22g

Try More No-Knead Bread Recipes:

Three slices of no-knead focaccia piled on a wooden cutting board

 

How to Make No-Knead Focaccia – Step By Step Photos

Flour Yeast and salt in a bowl

Start with 4 cups all-purpose flour, ¼ tsp instant yeast, and 1.5 tsp salt. Stir them together until everything is well combined.

Water being poured into flour mixture

Add 2 cups water to the flour mixture. This part will require a little flexibility on your part. You may need to add slightly less or slightly more water depending on the ambient humidity in your home and fluctuations with measuring the flour. I’ll show you what to look for in the next photos.

Dough that is too dry

Stir the water into the flour until it forms a ball of sticky dough and there is no more dry flour left on the bottom of the bowl. In the photo above, the dough is too dry. You can see dry flour on the bottom of the bowl and the dough ball is not cohesive. If this is your dough, add a tablespoon or two more water.

Sticky dough ball

Your dough should look like this. Sticky, but not slimy or shiny, and no dry flour on the bottom of the bowl. This style of dough is much more wet than traditional bread dough. Cover the bowl loosely and allow it to sit at room temperature for 12-18 hours.

Bubbly, fermented dough

After 12-18 hours the dough will look very bubbly and large, like this. Am I weird for thinking that’s gorgeous??

Pull dough from sides of the bowl

Sprinkle a little flour over the dough to keep your hands from sticking and pull the dough from the sides of the bowl. Turn the dough over onto itself a few times until it forms a sort of ball. Keep your hands well floured as you do this.

Dough ball in the bowl

This is what the dough looks like after I folded it onto itself a few times. The gluten matrix is well developed. You can tell by how smooth it is and the air bubbles trapped right under the surface.

Olive oil being drizzled onto a baking sheet

Line a baking sheet with foil, then drizzle 1 Tbsp olive oil over the surface. Use your hands to spread the oil to evenly coat the surface of the foil, then sprinkle about 2 Tbsp cornmeal over the oil.

Shaped focaccia on baking sheet, topped with more oil and herbs

Transfer the ball of dough to the prepared baking sheet and press and stretch it out until it fills the entire baking sheet. Drizzle one more tablespoon of olive oil over the surface of the dough, then sprinkle 1 Tbsp Italian seasoning over the surface (you can use a mix of basil, oregano, and red pepper if you don’t have Italian seasoning).

Fingers making indentations in unbaked focaccia

Let the dough rise for one hour (or a little more if your ambient room temperature is on the cool side). When you get close to the end of the rise time, begin preheating your oven to 425ºF. Use your fingers to make dimples all over the dough.

Baked focaccia on the baking sheet

Once the focaccia has risen and the oven is fully preheated, transfer the baking sheet to the oven and bake the focaccia for 20-25 minutes, or until it is nicely golden brown on top.

Focaccia on baking sheet, cut open

Look at those gorgeous bubbles!

No Knead Focaccia loaf cut into squares

Let the bread cool before slicing. You can slice it into 12 squares, or into strips, which are nice for dipping and dunking into soups and stews.

The post No-Knead Focaccia appeared first on Budget Bytes.

Irish Brown Bread

A couple of years ago I made my first loaf of Irish Soda Bread for St. Patrick’s Day, and instantly fell in love. I loved the thick, hearty texture and simple, yet complex, flavor. It’s perfect for toasting and slathering with butter and jam, to soak up extra broth from your favorite Irish stew or […]

The post Irish Brown Bread appeared first on Brown Eyed Baker.

A couple of years ago I made my first loaf of Irish Soda Bread for St. Patrick’s Day, and instantly fell in love. I loved the thick, hearty texture and simple, yet complex, flavor. It’s perfect for toasting and slathering with butter and jam, to soak up extra broth from your favorite Irish stew or to eat alongside corned beef hash. Any way you cut it, it’s a fabulous bread that I have enjoyed over and over since first trying it. This year, I started seeing mention of Irish brown bread and went about trying to find some authentic recipes. Well, I found tons. And they all seemed to contradict each other in terms of what makes Irish brown bread truly “authentic” – some had to contain oats, some said absolutely no eggs, some said only four ingredients, and the list goes on and on. In the end it seemed that there was no one set of rules for Irish brown bread and I decided on this version from David Lebovitz’ blog, which comes from the chef/owner of Longueville House in Ireland.

I loved this version because it included such a wide variety of flours and grains – all-purpose flour, whole wheat flour, and a combination of wheat bran and wheat germ. I used a stone-ground whole wheat flour and oat bran since I didn’t have any wheat bran or wheat germ on hand. It takes the hearty texture of the bread to a whole new level and is absolutely, utterly delicious. I cut the original recipe in half since the original calls for such a large amount of flour. David suggested dividing the recipe into two loaves, but I just halved it and made one. For the full recipe, be sure to check out David’s blog.

I think I am now officially converted to the brown bread version of Irish soda bread – it’s delish!

One year ago: Asiago Bagels
Two years ago: Baked Oatmeal
Three years ago: Royal Crown’s Tortano
Four years ago: Mexican Rice

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Irish Brown Bread

A classic bread recipe from Ireland
Course Bread
Cuisine Irish
Prep Time 10 minutes
Cook Time 35 minutes
Total Time 45 minutes
Servings 8 servings (1 loaf)
Calories 223kcal
Author Michelle

Ingredients

  • 1 cup + 1½ teaspoons whole wheat flour
  • ½ cup + 1½ teaspoons wheat bran oat bran or wheat germ, or a combination
  • 2 cups all-purpose flour
  • ¾ teaspoon baking soda
  • ½ teaspoon salt
  • 2 tablespoons unsalted butter cold and cut into small pieces
  • cups buttermilk
  • 1 teaspoon molasses

Instructions

  • 1. Preheat oven to 350 degrees F. Line a baking sheet with parchment paper or a silicone baking mat and put it on the center oven rack.
  • 2. Whisk together the whole wheat flour and wheat/oat bran or wheat germ in a large bowl.
  • 3. In a medium bowl, whisk together the all-purpose flour, baking soda and salt. Add to the wheat flour mixture and whisk to combine.
  • 4. Add the butter pieces and rub them into small pieces with the flour mixture using your fingers, until as small as possible.
  • 5. Stir in the buttermilk and molasses until the dough is uniformly damp. Turn out onto a lightly floured countertop and knead gently, until the dough forms a smooth ball.
  • 6. Use a sharp serrated knife (or a lame) to slice a cross deeply into the top of the bread, about 1-inch deep. Place the loaf on the hot baking sheet.
  • 7. Bake for about 30 to 35 minutes, or until the loaf is firm on top and when you tap the bottom, feels hollow.
  • 8. Remove from the oven and cool on a wire rack for about one hour before serving.

Nutrition

Calories: 223kcal | Carbohydrates: 39g | Protein: 7g | Fat: 4g | Saturated Fat: 2g | Cholesterol: 11mg | Sodium: 289mg | Potassium: 194mg | Fiber: 4g | Sugar: 2g | Vitamin A: 150IU | Calcium: 57mg | Iron: 2.4mg

The post Irish Brown Bread appeared first on Brown Eyed Baker.

Easy Homemade Bread

Want to make amazing bread? This homemade bread is easy to make and very versatile: it works for sandwiches, toast, and more! Want a go-to easy homemade bread recipe? Here’s ours! This recipe works for just about anything. It’s perfect for sandwiches, making toast, or serving with soup. Even better, it really is easy compared to other breads you’ll bake. (It’s loads simpler than sourdough bread.) You don’t need specialized equipment, and it bakes right in a 9-inch loaf pan. It’s got a little whole wheat flour, oats, and seeds on the top for added nutrients and flavor. You’ll never need to buy bread again! We think you’re going to love it…because our family is obsessed. How to make homemade bread: an overview Here’s an overview of how to make homemade bread! Here’s the basic outline of what you’re getting yourself into. What’s the total time? Baking this homemade bread takes 2 1/2 to 3 hours total, then 1.5 hours to cool it. It’s a project you’ll want to save for days off of work like weekends. (Or if you’re feeling ambitious, start early on a weeknight.) Here are the basic steps: Mix & knead the dough 15 minutes active […]

A Couple Cooks – Healthy, Whole Food, & Vegetarian Recipes

Want to make amazing bread? This homemade bread is easy to make and very versatile: it works for sandwiches, toast, and more!

Homemade bread

Want a go-to easy homemade bread recipe? Here’s ours! This recipe works for just about anything. It’s perfect for sandwiches, making toast, or serving with soup. Even better, it really is easy compared to other breads you’ll bake. (It’s loads simpler than sourdough bread.) You don’t need specialized equipment, and it bakes right in a 9-inch loaf pan. It’s got a little whole wheat flour, oats, and seeds on the top for added nutrients and flavor. You’ll never need to buy bread again! We think you’re going to love it…because our family is obsessed.

How to make homemade bread: an overview

Here’s an overview of how to make homemade bread! Here’s the basic outline of what you’re getting yourself into. What’s the total time? Baking this homemade bread takes 2 1/2 to 3 hours total, then 1.5 hours to cool it. It’s a project you’ll want to save for days off of work like weekends. (Or if you’re feeling ambitious, start early on a weeknight.) Here are the basic steps:

Mix & knead the dough15 minutes active time
Proof 145 to 60 minutes, hands off
Shape10 minutes active time
Proof 240 to 50 minutes, hands off
Bake30 minutes, hands off
Cool90 minutes, hands off
Homemade bread in pan

Equipment list: what you need!

One of the great things about this homemade bread is that you need minimal equipment! Sourdough bread requires lots of specialized equipment, and our favorite artisan bread recipe requires a Dutch oven. But this one? You only really need a loaf pan! There are 2 items that are optional:

Required tools for homemade bread (really, only one thing!)

  1. 8 or 9-inch loaf pan
  2. Kitchen scale (optional) for measuring the ingredients by weight
  3. Instant read thermometer (optional) for measuring the internal temperature

Why use a kitchen scale when baking homemade bread? Weighing out ingredients is the most accurate way to measure flour. Its volume varies based on the environment! But for this homemade bread recipe, exact precision is not as important as something like sourdough. So you can get away with cup measures!

Why use an instant read thermometer? Reading the bread’s internal temperature is the best way to determine whether the bread is fully baked. But you can get away with baking without it! Just judge whether the top is nicely golden brown.

Easy homemade bread recipe

What’s in this this homemade bread?

This homemade bread recipe is technically a white bread, but Alex and I wanted to infuse it with more nutrients and flavor. So it’s also got whole wheat flour and oats in the bread dough! This adds great flavor and helps to make it more filling. You can also add optional seeds to the top to get a nice contrasting texture.

  • Whole wheat flour and all purpose flour
  • Oats
  • Butter
  • Milk
  • Maple syrup
  • Yeast
  • Optional seed topping: poppy seeds, sunflower seeds
Homemade bread

What is proofing bread?

This homemade bread recipe calls for two proofs. If you don’t watch the Great British Baking Show like we do, you might wonder: What is proofing? Proofing is letting the bread dough rest so that it rises. This creates the desired fluffy texture of the bread (also called the crumbe).

What temperature should bread be proofed at?

  • Warm place: For best results, the proofing temperature should be between 80°F and 90°F. Many ovens have a proofing setting you can use for this step. (Just don’t forget about your proofing bread and accidentally turn on the oven to make something else!)
  • Room temperature: With this homemade bread, you can also proof at room temperature. The proofing temperature for sourdough bread is much more important since it’s a little more touchy. The bread can be proofed at either temperature.

How to store homemade bread

Another important thing about homemade bread is storage instructions! Because it doesn’t have preservatives like store-bought bread, the storage will be different than you might expect. Alex and I were thrilled when we tested this bread and it held up very well with both methods.

  • Room temperature: Store the bread at room temperature wrapped in plastic for 2 to 3 days
  • Refrigerator: Store refrigerated wrapped in plastic for up to 1 week (this bread stores refrigerated much better than an artisan loaf)
  • Freeze: Slice the bread into pieces, wrap in plastic, and it can freeze for 3 months
Toast with nut butter
This homemade bread is perfect with a slather of nut butter and drizzle of honey

Serving this bread!

This bread works wonderfully for so many things! Here’s what we like to use it for:

Make sure to check out our other Homemade Bread Recipes and top Baking Recipes You Should Know.

Homemade bread

This homemade bread recipe is…

Vegetarian. Vegan bread coming soon!

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Homemade bread

Easy Homemade Bread


1 Star2 Stars3 Stars4 Stars5 Stars (1 votes, average: 5.00 out of 5)

  • Author: Sonja Overhiser
  • Prep Time: 2 hours
  • Cook Time: 30 minutes
  • Total Time: 2 hours 30 minutes
  • Yield: 1 loaf (12 to 14 slices)

Description

Want to make amazing bread? This homemade bread is easy to make and very versatile: it works for sandwiches, toast, and more!


Ingredients

  • 2 tablespoons unsalted butter, melted (20 grams)
  • 1/2 cup milk (118 grams)
  • 2 tablespoons pure maple syrup (15 grams)
  • 3/4 cups warm water (177 grams)
  • 2 teaspoons instant or active dry yeast (8 grams)
  • 1 cup whole wheat flour (125 grams)
  • 2 1/4 cups all purpose flour (280 grams)
  • 1/2 cup rolled oats (45 grams)
  • 1 1/2 teaspoons kosher salt (8 grams)
  • 2 tablespoons seeds: sesame seeds, poppy seeds, sunflower seeds, etc (optional)

Instructions

  1. Make the dough: In a small saucepan, melt the butter over low heat. Once melted, remove from the heat and stir in the milk so it is just warm.
  2. In a large bowl, combine the melted butter and milk with the maple syrup, warm water, and yeast and mix with a wooden spoon or dough whisk until just combined. In a separate bowl, stir together whole wheat flour, all purpose flour, oats and kosher salt. Add the flours and oats to the bowl and stir with the spoon until just combined. Turn the dough out onto a clean, lightly floured countertop and form the dough into a ball.
  3. Knead the dough: Knead the dough by pushing with the base of your palm, then reforming it into a ball. Continue kneading for 8 minutes until the dough feels pillowy and has a smooth, stretchy exterior. If the dough is very sticky, add a small amount of flour while kneading. Alternatively: attach the dough hook to a stand mixer and start the mixer on medium-low speed, then allow the mixer to knead for 8 minutes.
  4. Proof 1: Place the dough ball in a clean bowl and cover with a clean dish towel. Allow the dough to stand in a warm place (proof) until it rises to double in size, about 45 minutes to an 1 hour.
  5. Shape the dough: Once proofed, grease an 8 to 9-inch loaf pan. Turn the dough onto a counter and gently press the dough into a large rectangle about 1/2-inch thick. The short side of the rectangle should be about the width of the long edge of the loaf pan. Roll the dough into a log (the width of the loaf pan). Pinch the seams on the sides and bottom of the roll and then place it into the greased pan seam-side down. Gently press the dough to fill the bottom of the pan.
  6. Proof 2: Cover with a clean dish towel and allow to proof for 40 to 50 minutes until the dough rises about 1 inch above the rim.
  7. Meanwhile, preheat the oven to 350°F.
  8. Bake the bread: Once proofed, brush with the top of the loaf with water. If desired, sprinkle the seeds on the top. Bake 30 to 35 minutes. The bread is done when the top is golden brown and the inside of the bread reaches 190°F on an instant read thermometer. Remove the bread to a cooling on a rack and cool completely, at least 90 minutes. (However tempting, cutting the bread while warm will ruin its texture!)
  9. Serve (+ storage info): Slice the bread and serve. Store the bread at room temperature for 2 to 3 days wrapped in plastic, or refrigerator for up to a week. The bread can also be frozen, sliced into pieces and wrapped in plastic, for 3 months.

  • Category: Bread
  • Method: Baked
  • Cuisine: Bread

Keywords: Homemade Bread, Homemade Bread Recipe

A Couple Cooks - Healthy, Whole Food, & Vegetarian Recipes