3 Easy Dinner Recipes Featuring Eggs, Eggs, & More Eggs

Eggs are a one-minute, emergency dinner—fry an egg, plop on toast, squiggle with ketchup or hot sauce—but they can be so much more without a ton of effort on your part.

My new cookbook, I Dream of Dinner (So You Don’t Have To), has an entire chapter d…

Eggs are a one-minute, emergency dinner—fry an egg, plop on toast, squiggle with ketchup or hot sauce—but they can be so much more without a ton of effort on your part.

My new cookbook, I Dream of Dinner (So You Don't Have To), has an entire chapter devoted to dinners built on eggs. That’s how much I depend on, believe in, and love eggs. Each chapter in my book organizes the recipes further by the techniques used to turn the main ingredient into dinner. That way, you have the moves that’ll get you dinner, even when following a recipe is just not happening tonight.

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A Make-Ahead Menu for a Laid-Back Dinner Party

We’ve teamed up with our friends at Line 39 to share a step-by-step guide for weekend entertaining, featuring top-notch bottles. From citrusy Sauvignon Blanc to plum-forward Merlot, each Line 39 wine is crafted in California with care.

Some people’s…

We’ve teamed up with our friends at Line 39 to share a step-by-step guide for weekend entertaining, featuring top-notch bottles. From citrusy Sauvignon Blanc to plum-forward Merlot, each Line 39 wine is crafted in California with care.


Some people’s summer hobbies include surfing, fishing, tanning—I partake in none of these activities. My preferred summer hobby is sitting outside on a warm night with lots of food to graze on. Often these nights happen at the end of full days, when the sun has made me a little sleepy, friends are over, and bottles of wine (something light and refreshing, like Line 39 Sauvignon Blanc) crowd the table.

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The Easiest, Breeziest Dinner Menu for Summer Fridays

We’ve teamed up with our friends at Line 39 for a guide to stress-free entertaining any night of the week—just add wine. All of their wines are crafted in California with care, from bright, lightly earthy Pinot Noir to Rosé that’s bursting with strawbe…

We’ve teamed up with our friends at Line 39 for a guide to stress-free entertaining any night of the week—just add wine. All of their wines are crafted in California with care, from bright, lightly earthy Pinot Noir to Rosé that’s bursting with strawberry flavor, and beyond.


You know those hosts who seem like they just “threw everything together”? Who glide around the room, wine in hand, laughing with guests—and somehow also manage to get a feast on the table?

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How to DIY a Champagne Tower for Your Your Best New Year’s Yet

Let’s face it: even the most well-thought out and well-intentioned New Year’s Eve plans are probably going to have to scale back in some way this year. One day, we promise, you’ll be able to overpay for tickets to a NYE event, sipping watered-own cockt…

Let's face it: even the most well-thought out and well-intentioned New Year's Eve plans are probably going to have to scale back in some way this year. One day, we promise, you'll be able to overpay for tickets to a NYE event, sipping watered-own cocktail after watered-down cocktail to make the most of the open bar before midnight rolls around. We can also promise (with almost 100% certainty) that such a New Year's will make you yearn for the years you spent it cuddled up on the couch, eating frozen Trader Joe's apps, and drinking all the sparkling wine your little heart desired.

For now, though, your pared-down gathering can get a little gussied up. And by a little, we mean with minimal effort and maximum effect. What are we referring to? A champagne tower, of course. Is there anything more over-the-top New Year's than a champagne tower? No, no there is not. And good news all around: it's not very difficult to do.

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How to Chill Pie Dough at the Absolute Last Minute

Thanksgiving is just around the corner. Maybe you’re reading this a few days in advance, the night before, or gulp the morning of. You followed all the proper avenues to get ready for the Thanksgiving feast—you defrosted and brined the turkey; you cut …

Thanksgiving is just around the corner. Maybe you’re reading this a few days in advance, the night before, or gulp the morning of. You followed all the proper avenues to get ready for the Thanksgiving feast—you defrosted and brined the turkey; you cut a loaf of sourdough or cornbread into cubes for stuffing and left them out to dry; you even ironed the linens and bought flowers for a centerpiece. But the one thing you forgot? Chilling the pie dough for your pumpkin, pecan, and apple pie. For the best pie, it’s always best to work with very cold dough.

And now it’s the morning of Thanksgiving and you want to bake pies, but the dough is still too warm to roll out. Did you forget to put the pie or cookie dough in the fridge overnight? Did you pull out any hairs yet? Don't fret, don't pull your hair! Our beautiful community of smart, savvy home cooks has faced this very conundrum time and time again. And that’s where our hotline comes in. Food52 user and pie prowess CV posted a very simple, very cool (pun intended) trick over on the hotline to help us out:

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How to Make Queso, Any Which Way

Some of our favorite recipes are the kind that can be endlessly riffed on to suit your tastes, the occasion, or what’s in your fridge on a given night. We’ve partnered with Hidden Valley Ranch to highlight one such dish: addictive, melty queso blanco.

Some of our favorite recipes are the kind that can be endlessly riffed on to suit your tastes, the occasion, or what's in your fridge on a given night. We've partnered with Hidden Valley Ranch to highlight one such dish: addictive, melty queso blanco.

Some of our favorite recipes are the kind that can be endlessly riffed on to suit your tastes, the occasion, or what's in your fridge on a given night. One such dish is most definitely addictive, melty queso, and if you learn how to make queso with all our tried and true tips, you never have to go without it.

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Not All Alcohol Is Vegan—Here Are 45 Bottles That Are

When Guinness announced that, after 256 years, its stout is going vegan, a common reaction was: Wait, what? How can beer not be vegan?
But in fact, a number of alcohols use animal-derived products in their production (especially in the aging or fi…

When Guinness announced that, after 256 years, its stout is going vegan, a common reaction was: Wait, what? How can beer not be vegan?

But in fact, a number of alcohols use animal-derived products in their production (especially in the aging or filtration processes). There could be albumin from egg whites; casein (derived from milk); carmine, aka ground beetles; chitin from shellfish; gelatin from animal bones or tissue; or isinglass, a gelatin from fish (that’s what Guinness stout has had).

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The Difference Between Pepitas & Pumpkin Seeds

What are pepitas, really? And are they any different from regular ol’ pumpkin seeds? Food writer Ali Slagle finds out.
I had this (not brilliant at all) idea to try to shell the pumpkin seeds that were being excavated from our many, many carved pumpkin…

What are pepitas, really? And are they any different from regular ol' pumpkin seeds? Food writer Ali Slagle finds out.

I had this (not brilliant at all) idea to try to shell the pumpkin seeds that were being excavated from our many, many carved pumpkins around the office—the thinking being that hulling the seeds would produce something more workable and multipurpose, namely pepitas (“little seed of squash” in Spanish). Because pepitas are shelled pumpkin seeds, right?

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