Mastering My Family’s Filipino Spring Rolls Was a Rite of Passage

Good food is worth a thousand words—sometimes more. In My Family Recipe, a writer shares the story of a single dish that’s meaningful to them and their loved ones. This week, in honor of Asian Pacific American Heritage Month, food stylist and recipe de…

Good food is worth a thousand words—sometimes more. In My Family Recipe, a writer shares the story of a single dish that's meaningful to them and their loved ones. This week, in honor of Asian Pacific American Heritage Month, food stylist and recipe developer Amelia Rampe remembers her favorite Filipino dish, lumpia.

Growing up, an important skill for me was learning how to make lumpia (Filipino spring rolls). But what is lumpia, anyway? They’re a Filipino version of spring rolls made with lumpia wrappers and typically filled with ground pork, carrots and onions, cabbage, ginger, garlic, and soy sauce. The mixture is either sautéed in a skillet for a pre-cook or simply scooped into neat balls of uncooked meat. A few tablespoons of the mixture are added to each wrapper before each one is tucked and rolled neatly. Once all the rolls are formed, they’re pan-fried until crispy and hot. Learning how to make the filling, filling the wrappers just so, and folding them without causing them to break is no easy task. I had to get through the most basic tasks before I could graduate to the assembly stage. 

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Meet the Chef Who’s Celebrating Indigenous Mayan Food

It’s 80 degrees Fahrenheit and pouring rain on the beach in the Sian Ka’an Biosphere Nature Reserve, located in Quintana Roo, Mexico. Despite the intermittent torrential downpours, the Caribbean Sea is bright turquoise beneath the dark rain clouds in t…

It’s 80 degrees Fahrenheit and pouring rain on the beach in the Sian Ka’an Biosphere Nature Reserve, located in Quintana Roo, Mexico. Despite the intermittent torrential downpours, the Caribbean Sea is bright turquoise beneath the dark rain clouds in the distance.

Under a large hut made of bamboo and palms, a chef is quietly running his kitchen. This kitchen is unlike any other restaurant kitchen I’ve been in.

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I Ate My Way Through Bangkok, but This Is the Dish I Can’t Stop Thinking About

It was my first day in Bangkok. I woke up in a jet-lagged haze, but I also had a rumbling tummy, and a voice in my head telling me not to waste any time. I rolled over to pick up my phone and read the many restaurant suggestions my friend and former co…

It was my first day in Bangkok. I woke up in a jet-lagged haze, but I also had a rumbling tummy, and a voice in my head telling me not to waste any time. I rolled over to pick up my phone and read the many restaurant suggestions my friend and former colleague—also a former contestant on “Top Chef Thailand” and now a chef in Bangkok—Steve Doucakis had texted me. One of them was the name Jeh-O Chula, accompanied by an address and a note saying, “You gotta go here.”

Outside, it was pouring rain—a hot and steamy July evening. I ordered a Grab (Thailand’s version of Uber), and headed out for an early dinner by myself. It was just before 6 p.m. when I pulled up to Jeh-O Chula. “How many?” asked a man with a clipboard at the entrance. “Just one,” I replied. I was seated almost immediately.

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She Invented Banana Ketchup & Saved Thousands of Lives. Why Have We Never Heard of Her?

I’ve seen the look on my friends’ faces when the words banana ketchup are uttered. Confusion, maybe even disgust. How can two things with such different flavor profiles exist in one product? Despite its seeming incongruity, banana ketchup is a pantry s…

I’ve seen the look on my friends’ faces when the words banana ketchup are uttered. Confusion, maybe even disgust. How can two things with such different flavor profiles exist in one product? Despite its seeming incongruity, banana ketchup is a pantry staple that rings nostalgic to many Filipinos all over the world.

Magdalo V. Francisco, Sr. is credited with mass-producing banana ketchup in 1942, thus making it a fixture in the Filipino household. To this day it’s used as a condiment that accompanies many popular dishes such as tortang talong (an eggplant omelet), fried chicken, hamburgers, and Filipino spaghetti (pasta with banana ketchup and sliced hot dogs).

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The Filipino-Style Flan That Takes Me Back to My Childhood

There are a million ways to cook with eggs and we’ve partnered with Pete and Gerry’s Organic Eggs—whose family-run, free-range farms produce delicious, all-organic eggs—to share a few of our favorites. Here, Food Stylist and Recipe Developer Amelia Ram…

There are a million ways to cook with eggs and we've partnered with Pete and Gerry's Organic Eggs—whose family-run, free-range farms produce delicious, all-organic eggs—to share a few of our favorites. Here, Food Stylist and Recipe Developer Amelia Rampe shares a few creative riffs on the Filipino-style flan she grew up loving (think: spicy horchata, ginger-turmeric, and more!).


Before I moved to Brooklyn, I lived in Seattle for 12 years. I had a wonderful community of women there, and every month or so I would invite them over for wine and cheese parties.

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