The Best Shelf-Stable Emergency Foods, Tasted & Explained

Floods in Kentucky. Fires out west. Hurricane season in the South. And with winter right around the corner, it’s time to consider how prepared you are for natural disasters. The CDC recommends Americans have, at any given time, at least a three-day sup…

Floods in Kentucky. Fires out west. Hurricane season in the South. And with winter right around the corner, it’s time to consider how prepared you are for natural disasters. The CDC recommends Americans have, at any given time, at least a three-day supply of water and food that doesn't require refrigeration or cooking. That kind of cushion, said FEMA experts in an interview, can give you enough time to figure out your next move in the event of an emergency.

"If you're buying a case of soup or a big container of Jif peanut butter from Costco, you're prepping," said Eric Christianson of Nutrient Survival, whose company entered the so-called “emergency food market” in 2020. "A lot of people think it's about fear or panic, but it's about being prepared and being smart about it, especially if you have family, elderly, kids, [or] pets. You need to be ready."

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Skip the Hurricane—Frozen Irish Coffee Is a New Orleans Staple Worth Sipping

If you ever find yourself in New Orleans’ French Quarter, perched on a stool inside Molly’s at the Market, a frozen Irish Coffee sloshing in your gut and feeling that kind of inner glow that translates to “Man, I wish I could stay here forever,” you wo…

If you ever find yourself in New Orleans’ French Quarter, perched on a stool inside Molly's at the Market, a frozen Irish Coffee sloshing in your gut and feeling that kind of inner glow that translates to "Man, I wish I could stay here forever," you would not be the first.

In fact, you'd be next in a long line of bar patrons, many of whom have had that exact wish granted while seated inside. As its name implies, Molly’s sits on Decatur Street near the French Market, and on busy days, customers can either head inside the doors or be served sidewalk-side from a window facing the street. But inside, behind the bar, urns contain the remains of longtime customers (yes, you read that right); they’re interspersed between top-shelf liquors, dangling patches, and baseball caps from first responders, years-old photos of patrons and bartenders, drawings, and satirical bumper stickers.

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New Orleans’ Cult Favorite Sandwich Shop Finally Has A Cookbook

One of the first photos you’ll find inside Mason Hereford’s debut cookbook, Turkey and the Wolf, is a portrait where he’s surrounded not by his own dishes, but by a box of Cheez-Its, a crumbled bag of Doritos and a scattering of mixed Hershey’s miniatu…

One of the first photos you'll find inside Mason Hereford's debut cookbook, Turkey and the Wolf, is a portrait where he's surrounded not by his own dishes, but by a box of Cheez-Its, a crumbled bag of Doritos and a scattering of mixed Hershey's miniatures.

What follows is a dive into what Hereford's brother calls his "psychedelically objective imagination," a guidebook to creating the whimsical stoner food you’ll find inside his New Orleans restaurants, Molly’s Rise and Shine and Turkey and the Wolf.

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Yakamein Is the Best Way to Recover From Mardi Gras

There are many things Chef Linda Green can make for you—shrimp and crabmeat dressing, crawfish macaroni and cheese, gumbo, bread pudding—but there’s only one dish so consistently attributed to her that it earned her her own epithet: Yakamein.

It’s a s…

There are many things Chef Linda Green can make for you—shrimp and crabmeat dressing, crawfish macaroni and cheese, gumbo, bread pudding—but there's only one dish so consistently attributed to her that it earned her her own epithet: Yakamein.

It's a salty, umami-rich soup filled with noodles, hard-boiled egg, a choice of meat and dusted with chopped green onions, is a hybrid of Black American and Asian-American cooking. When you finish a cup, the list sips are often filled with the broth's seasonings that settle in the bottom. And it's fair to say that culinary experience, while available in various places across the United States, has been perfected by New Orleans' own Linda Green, the Yakamein Lady.

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How to Celebrate Mardi Gras, Wherever You Are

We’ve teamed up with Zatarain’s® Smoked Sausage to bring the flavors of a New Orleans Mardi Gras to your kitchen, no matter where you’re celebrating. On the menu: flavor-packed, crowd-friendly dishes starring Zatarain’s Andouille Smoked Sausage, classi…

We’ve teamed up with Zatarain’s® Smoked Sausage to bring the flavors of a New Orleans Mardi Gras to your kitchen, no matter where you’re celebrating. On the menu: flavor-packed, crowd-friendly dishes starring Zatarain’s Andouille Smoked Sausage, classic cocktails, and plenty of good tunes to get the party started.


It's been two years since New Orleans has been able to truly celebrate Mardi Gras: filling the city’s streets with parades, dancing, and merry-making like it has for over a hundred years. But now, Carnival is officially back, and the party has already started, so it's time to revel in all the season has to offer.

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The Delightful Tradition of Mardi Gras Food Throws

Like most people who grew up in south Louisiana, Norby Chabert has a vivid memory when it comes to his favorite things he’s caught at Mardi Gras parades. One of those, from when he was just a young boy, has nothing to do with the glittering plastic bea…

Like most people who grew up in south Louisiana, Norby Chabert has a vivid memory when it comes to his favorite things he's caught at Mardi Gras parades. One of those, from when he was just a young boy, has nothing to do with the glittering plastic beads, small toys or other trinkets most often tossed off the side of Carnival floats. Instead, it's Choc-O-Jels.

The small, chocolate-covered sandwich cakes with a fruit jam in the center are now called Jelly Creme Pies, but back then, Chabert just knew them as the Little Debbie cakes his grandmother would keep in the refrigerator for a cold snack. He remembers the moment on a parade route when a float-rider lifted a whole case of the tiny cakes into view.

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The Traveling Bartenders That Sustain New Orleans’ Parade Goers

Shannon Paxton is standing in the middle of a New Orleans street, her T-shirt declaring her a “Hood Celebrity,” the smile across her face an invitation to the crowd growing around her.

“How you doing, queen?” she calls through the mix of locals, touri…

Shannon Paxton is standing in the middle of a New Orleans street, her T-shirt declaring her a “Hood Celebrity,” the smile across her face an invitation to the crowd growing around her.

“How you doing, queen?” she calls through the mix of locals, tourists, and curious passersby to a trio of friends, who immediately ask for “something with Hennessy.” Paxton says of course, and her hand disappears among the rainbow of pouches in the ice-filled wagon at her feet. She finds what she’s looking for and completes the transaction, handing off the pouch of Hennessy lemonade from the small cart filled with blood orange margaritas, Crown Apple concoctions, and Paxton’s own special, a bright-blue tropical drink she calls the Pussy Fairy.

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