Our 19 Favorite Ground Beef Recipes

When it comes to dinnertime, a pound of ground beef can be the start of something great. I’m thinking meatballs floating in tomato-butter sauce or minestrone soup (or even grape jelly—don’t knock it till you’ve tried it!). Or maybe smash burgers slathe…

When it comes to dinnertime, a pound of ground beef can be the start of something great. I’m thinking meatballs floating in tomato-butter sauce or minestrone soup (or even grape jelly—don’t knock it till you’ve tried it!). Or maybe smash burgers slathered with ketchup and mustard, shatteringly crisp lumpia, spicy kebabs wrapped tightly in chapati, a steaming bowl of chili with a skillet of cornbread on the side. Whichever direction your taste buds are sending you, these ground beef recipes will feed a crowd.

Some of these recipes are takes on classic dishes that swap in grains or vegetarian protein for some of the beef. And even if you’re not a meat eater at all (but have somehow found yourself reading this, a roundup of ground beef recipes), there are still options. Swap in a ground faux meat like Impossible or Beyond, which both make vegan ground “beef” offerings that would work relatively seamlessly in any of these 19 ground beef recipes.

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7 Best Rosé Wine Brands—for All Kinds of Wine-Lovers

In preparation for those summer days when it’s too hot to move, much less walk to the wine shop, I like to keep at least a couple bottles of vino in the fridge at all times (and maybe a few more on the bar cart, just in case). The rest of the Food52 te…

In preparation for those summer days when it’s too hot to move, much less walk to the wine shop, I like to keep at least a couple bottles of vino in the fridge at all times (and maybe a few more on the bar cart, just in case). The rest of the Food52 team clearly thinks so, too. While I tend to be more of a light red fan, when the weather gets so warm you’re sweating at breakfast, a glass of rosé can be just the thing. And before you say “I don’t like rosé—it’s too sweet,” hold on a sec. Just because many rosé wine brands fall on the sweeter side doesn’t mean all rosés taste like melted watermelon Jolly Ranchers. Some are sweet, yes (and if wine that tastes like cotton candy is your thing, I wouldn’t dream of yucking your yum!), but other rosé wines have floral notes of ripe, red summer fruit yet stay dry and crisp on the palate; or they’re bubbly and tart; some are quite savory, even herbal in flavor. There’s a great rosé for any kind of wine-lover, I promise.

Of course, for some folks, the answer to “what’s the best rosé wine brand?” is “any one that’s made into frosé,” but other people have more specific bottles in mind. Here are the seven best rosé wine brands, according to team Food52.

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Betcha Didn’t Know All of These Were Stone Fruits

Whether you’re wandering around in a farmers market or passing through a section of the grocery store, odds are you’ve seen the term “stone fruit” tossed around near the peaches and plums. You put your keen mind to the task and gather that the term is …

Whether you’re wandering around in a farmers market or passing through a section of the grocery store, odds are you’ve seen the term “stone fruit” tossed around near the peaches and plums. You put your keen mind to the task and gather that the term is referencing a fruit (great start) with a, well, stone-like pit. Nailed it! But is there more to the concept? What is a stone fruit, exactly?

What is a stone fruit?

We’ve already gone over the obvious: Stone fruits are those with pits in the center. Officially, they’re fruits with a fleshy exterior known as the mesocarp (covered with a skin, or exocarp) that encases a stone or pit (the shell of which is a hardened endocarp with a seed inside). Also known as drupes, this category includes peaches, plums, cherries, nectarines, apricots, and pluots.

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12 Fruit Desserts to Make With Your Farmers Market Haul

When it comes to fruit desserts, there really are no rules. Toss peaches into pie, blend blueberries into ice cream. Arrange cherries in cobbler, layer plums in a crumble. (Should I stop? You get it.)

Jason Schreiber definitely gets it. His cookbook, …

When it comes to fruit desserts, there really are no rules. Toss peaches into pie, blend blueberries into ice cream. Arrange cherries in cobbler, layer plums in a crumble. (Should I stop? You get it.)

Jason Schreiber definitely gets it. His cookbook, Fruit Cake, is a celebration of (you guessed it!) cakes that feature fruit. From tea and snack cakes that are just as welcome at 11 a.m. as they are at 10 p.m, to multilayered, custard-filled, and cream-topped showstoppers, the book is filled with fruit desserts. There are plenty of formal cakes, like Coconut Pound Cake and Hazelnut Plum Snacking Cake, but also fun variations on a theme, like Cranberry Pecan Muffins and Strawberry Tamales de Dulce. We’re talking fruit desserts so dang vibrant, you'll find yourself seized with the urge to run to the nearest farmers market and buy a bushel of whatever’s in season—because there’s probably a recipe in here for a treat featuring whichever fruit you come back with.

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Nigella’s Brilliant Secret for Better Bread

Starchy water. We know by now to always save at least a ladleful of that cloudy, well-salted liquid after boiling a pot of pasta, an ingredient necessary for transforming a skillet of melted fat and beaten eggs into silky carbonara, or for seamlessly m…

Starchy water. We know by now to always save at least a ladleful of that cloudy, well-salted liquid after boiling a pot of pasta, an ingredient necessary for transforming a skillet of melted fat and beaten eggs into silky carbonara, or for seamlessly melting grated Parmesan into creamy vodka sauce so the mixture becomes a proper emulsion, nary a cheese clump in sight. And what about the water used for boiling potatoes? I’ll never forget a line in Laura Ingalls Wilder’s The Long Winter: “There was no milk but Ma said, ‘leave a very little of the boiling water in, and after you mash them beat them extra hard with a big spoon.’ The potatoes turned out white and fluffy.” I haven’t made mashed potatoes with milk since—just butter and starchy water.

The point is clear: Be it science or magic, that cloudy water left over from boiling pasta or potatoes holds the key to a lot of deliciousness. And where there is deliciousness, there is usually also the work of Nigella Lawson.

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How to Cook Pork Tenderloin to Perfection

Reasonably priced and bearing enough meat to feed the whole family, pork tenderloin is the obvious choice for many households when planning a meaty main dish. Still, if not prepared thoughtfully, pork tenderloin can go dry and dull—not what you want af…

Reasonably priced and bearing enough meat to feed the whole family, pork tenderloin is the obvious choice for many households when planning a meaty main dish. Still, if not prepared thoughtfully, pork tenderloin can go dry and dull—not what you want after spending all that energy in the kitchen. When it comes to pork tenderloin, there are a couple tricks to achieving a moist, tender roast.

What Is Pork Tenderloin? Is that Different from Pork Loin?

Pork tenderloin and pork loin are not the same thing. The former (also known as pork fillet or pork tender) is long and thin, cut from the muscle running along the spine; the latter (also known as a pork center rib roast or a center-cut pork loin roast) is a heftier slab of meat with a fat cap, cut from back by the ribs (you may know it better sliced, as a pork chop). Perfect for those “I need dinner in an hour” nights, pork tenderloin cooks up tender and quickly when properly prepped.

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OK, I’ll Bite: What Are Ramps?

If you see a crowd gathering around a stall at your local farmers market any time between mid-April and early June, odds are you’ve stumbled across someone selling ramps. Let me tell you, nothing gets people who know and love ramps more excited than se…

If you see a crowd gathering around a stall at your local farmers market any time between mid-April and early June, odds are you’ve stumbled across someone selling ramps. Let me tell you, nothing gets people who know and love ramps more excited than seeing those first green leaves on a warm spring morning. Of course, by appearance alone, they’re simply yet another plant in a sea of green at the market. So, what’s all the fuss about? What are ramps?

What Are Ramps, Anyway?

Ramps (allium tricoccum), sometimes referred to as wild leeks or wild garlic, are technically a wild onion that grow most abundantly in the eastern and central U.S. and Canada (though you can find them showing their verdant heads in a couple other southern and western American states). Ramp patches typically begin to sprout in wooded areas around early April, and last until May or early June.

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This Bookshelf Turned My Dusty Pile of Cookbooks into a Tidy Collection

Welcome to Your No-Sweat Guide to Spring Cleaning, a monthlong series that puts the fun (yep, for real!) back into cleaning. We’re talking spruce-ups that take less than 5 minutes, why-didn’t-I-think-of-that hacks, and hands-off cleaning tasks that bas…

Welcome to Your No-Sweat Guide to Spring Cleaning, a monthlong series that puts the fun (yep, for real!) back into cleaning. We’re talking spruce-ups that take less than 5 minutes, why-didn’t-I-think-of-that hacks, and hands-off cleaning tasks that basically…do themselves—plus our trustiest tools and helpers. The goal: Clean less, go outside more.


I own too many cookbooks, probably (definitely). Between decades of gifts, working as a food editor, and, well, simply loving cookbooks, I’ve amassed quite a collection of the thick hardcovers. Every so often I comb through for some I rarely use that could stand to be donated; for the most part, I can’t bear to part with these heavyweights. Storing them all in one place in one-bedroom apartments has been, shall we say, an adventure.

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How Much Ham Per Person Is Just Right?

When it comes to planning the ham for Easter dinner (or any meal where a large-format pork will be the hero), a number of questions present themselves almost immediately: Where should I buy the ham? What type of ham should I buy? Bone-in or boneless? H…

When it comes to planning the ham for Easter dinner (or any meal where a large-format pork will be the hero), a number of questions present themselves almost immediately: Where should I buy the ham? What type of ham should I buy? Bone-in or boneless? How much ham per person? and so on. Odds are your holiday meal will be a bit smaller this year than it has been in years past, but these questions remain just as important when serving your household of three as they were when you were hosting 20. So, let’s break it down.

How much ham per person?

The best rule of thumb for ham is to plan about 1/2 pound per person when picking a bone-in ham (it’s heavier) and 1/3 pound if boneless. Look, at the end of the day, some people will eat more than expected, some will eat less—it’ll even out. If you’re making a lot of side dishes, err on the smaller side; if you texted your roommates "ham party at 3 p.m. on Sunday," consider buying more.

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Preserved Lemons Belong in Dessert (Yes, Dessert!)—Here’s Why

Preserved lemon is one of those ingredients that, once it becomes a regular part of your cooking routine, it’s nearly impossible to do without. Savory dishes like crunchy salad, oil-slicked pasta, and tender roast chicken all beg for a hit of tangy, sa…

Preserved lemon is one of those ingredients that, once it becomes a regular part of your cooking routine, it’s nearly impossible to do without. Savory dishes like crunchy salad, oil-slicked pasta, and tender roast chicken all beg for a hit of tangy, salty preserved lemon. But what happens when, instead of stirring chopped preserved lemon into salad dressing or couscous, you fold it into cake batter? Magic, that’s what.

To back up: Preserved lemon, or salted whole lemons fermented until soft, is typically used as a seasoning or condiment in Tunisian, Moroccan, Israeli, Iranian, Turkish, and other North African and Middle Eastern cuisines, as well in dishes around the Indian subcontinent, where it’s known as lemon pickle, and is also seasoned with additional flavors like turmeric, chili powder, and cumin, among others, depending on the region. Chopped whole (yes, pith and peel, too) and seeded, preserved lemon can be stirred into nearly any dish that calls for fresh lemon, adding all the brightness of tart citrus with a bit more complexity. The brine, a deeply seasoned, lightly lemony syrup, should also be used in cooking, even after the lemons are gone.

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