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Lionfish Are Harming Our Oceans—Here’s One (Delicious) Way to Fight Them

Lionfish first appeared in the United States in 1985, off Florida’s Atlantic coast. Native to the coral reefs around the South Pacific and Indian Oceans, they were originally brought to the States as exotic pets. It’s believed that some of these pet ow…

Lionfish first appeared in the United States in 1985, off Florida’s Atlantic coast. Native to the coral reefs around the South Pacific and Indian Oceans, they were originally brought to the States as exotic pets. It’s believed that some of these pet owners eventually released their fish into local waterways—and unknowingly introduced an invasive species to the Gulf of Mexico.

Lionfish have no natural predators in the Gulf, can lay between 27,000 to 100,000 eggs every 2.5 days, and decimate the ecology of local fish by consuming about 20 smaller fish every 30 minutes. After their initial appearance in Florida, they quickly spread to other states, but Florida continues to suffer from some of the most extreme consequences. In our southernmost state, lionfish wreak havoc on the food supply of native fish like grouper and snapper, and their overconsumption of herbivorous fish results in damage to the reefs that line the Florida coast. It’s a dangerous combination that could result in lionfish causing grave damage to the delicate balance of life in and around Florida, and all the states bordering the Gulf of Mexico. That’s where marine biologist Alex Fogg comes in.

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How the Turkish Hospitality Industry Rallied to Aid Earthquake Victims

The first time I really understood the gravity of damage that comes with a life-altering earthquake was in 2010, when a 7.0-magnitude earthquake hit my paternal homeland of Haiti. Shortly after getting the news, my aunt, Marie France Conde, moved hell …

The first time I really understood the gravity of damage that comes with a life-altering earthquake was in 2010, when a 7.0-magnitude earthquake hit my paternal homeland of Haiti. Shortly after getting the news, my aunt, Marie France Conde, moved hell and high water to be one of the first doctors on the scene. It took her two days to arrive in Port-Au-Prince (no commercial flights were allowed into the country) and when she arrived, she said that the airport landing strip looked like “a warzone.” A pediatrician, my aunt jumped into action: building and running makeshift infirmaries for children, and trying to create some form of order in the face of insurmountable—and ongoing—need. “Even now, over 10 years later, there are still people who have not been able to rebuild their homes,” she said.

As I think about the recent earthquake that devastated Turkey and Syria, I see parallels between what happened in Haiti and what’s happening thousands of miles across the world. While the tragedy of that natural disaster was plastered all over our screens for days, the news cycle has focused less on the people and the amazing professionals who are aiding at the epicenter—like those in the hospitality industry who have jumped in to help their fellow citizens.

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How the Black Community Finds Beauty in the Messiness of Gardening

You can Grow Your Own Way. All spring and summer, we’re playing in the vegetable garden; join us for step-by-step guides, highly recommended tools, backyard tours, juicy-ripe recipes, and then some. Let’s get our hands dirty.
When I think about garden…

You can Grow Your Own Way. All spring and summer, we’re playing in the vegetable garden; join us for step-by-step guides, highly recommended tools, backyard tours, juicy-ripe recipes, and then some. Let’s get our hands dirty.

When I think about gardening and farming, I think about the innate messiness that comes with agricultural work. There’s dirt and mud everywhere and, no matter how much effort you put in or how much you “play by the book”, you cannot control when, or if, your plants thrive. Perfectionism is one of the many byproducts of generations of Black people trying to survive in the Western world. My mom always used to say “you have to be twice as good to get half as much” and I know she’s just one of many Black parents to teach their children this hard truth. This creates an unreachable goal of perfectionism that many Black people feel confined by. But where can creativity grow within these societal rules for survival? Can the joyful messiness that is gardening, or just being in nature, help to ease these ancestral tensions that we hold and create space for new passions?

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How the Weed and Wine Worlds are Merging

In The Green Scene, there’s no such thing as a silly question about cannabis. What’s the difference between THC and CBD? How the heck do I make edibles at home? What home design advice can dispensaries teach me? Kick back—we have the answers.

One of…

In The Green Scene, there's no such thing as a silly question about cannabis. What's the difference between THC and CBD? How the heck do I make edibles at home? What home design advice can dispensaries teach me? Kick back—we have the answers.


One of the first things that I was told about weed and wine is that the two do not mix. In my college year, the term “twisted” was used when someone got really drunk and high at the same time, and it was the definition of unintentionally killing the vibe of a good theater-kid party. It wasn’t until I spoke to Karli Warner, the co-founder and CMO of The Garden Society, that I was introduced to the possibilities of how these two worlds can coexist deliciously.

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