Upcoming Events – Live and Online!

Leaning into the world of live, online presentations, chats, and interviews, I’ve got several lined up in the next few weeks. Some are free and others are ticketed. Please check the time zones where you live and confirm with the websites or venues to confirm times (because it’s a challenge for me to keep track of multiple time zones), and you’re welcome to contact the…

Leaning into the world of live, online presentations, chats, and interviews, I’ve got several lined up in the next few weeks. Some are free and others are ticketed. Please check the time zones where you live and confirm with the websites or venues to confirm times (because it’s a challenge for me to keep track of multiple time zones), and you’re welcome to contact the venues for additional information or registration assistance. Looking forward to seeing you!

April

April 17 (tomorrow!): I’ll be in conversation with my friend Reem Kassis about her new book, The Arabesque Table from 2-3pm ET. I made the Halvah from Reem’s new book (which was amazing) and I’m looking forward to delving deeper into the subject of the book with her. To register for this free chat, click here.

April 19: One of my favorite guests from Instagram Live Apéro Hour is back! Join us as she makes one of my very favorite cocktails from her bar in Paris at 6pm CET/Paris time (Noon ET, 9am PT)

April 20: I’m back with the San Francisco Baker’s Dozen, from my old stomping ground, with an online baking demo taking place 9:45am PT. It’s free for members. Register here.

April 26: Join me for a live seminar on French Apéritifs: History, Context, and Culture online with Context Conversations, 5pm ET. Register Slope Cellars talking about French apéritifs and spirits. He’ll also share one of his favorite cocktail recipes. 4pm ET.

[Context is offering a special link that will give first-time customers Upcoming Events – Live and Online!...

Halvah

A few years ago, tahini took its place in the spotlight. People discovered the sesame paste, usually used in hummus, could be used in cookies, cakes, salad dressings, sauces as well as in other places. Soon halvah also had its day, becoming a star ingredient in tart doughs and rugelach. But halvah is a wonderful treat on its own. During my childhood, I’d only been…

A few years ago, tahini took its place in the spotlight. People discovered the sesame paste, usually used in hummus, could be used in cookies, cakes, salad dressings, sauces as well as in other places. Soon halvah also had its day, becoming a star ingredient in tart doughs and rugelach. But halvah is a wonderful treat on its own.

During my childhood, I’d only been exposed to halvah sold in bars by the cash register in delis, but when I went to Jerusalem, I was wowed at the market to see towering rounds of halvah at places like Halvah Kingdom, which were topped (and studded or swirled) with various ingredients like dried fruit, nuts, rose petals, cocoa, coffee beans, and chocolate amongst the reported one hundred varieties that they make. The halvah was like nothing I’d ever put in my mouth; you could taste the quality of the sesame seeds used in every crumbly bite. (If you want a taste of outstanding halvah in the U.S., check out Seed & Mill.)

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Buttermilk Fattoush

One of my very favorite salads is Fattoush. There are various versions of the salad, whose name comes from fatta, which refers to the crumbled or torn pieces of flatbread in the salad. But I’ve never had Fattoush with buttermilk dressing, so was intrigued when I saw a recipe for it in Falastin: A Cookbook by Sami Tamimi and Tara Wigley, a book which eloquently…

One of my very favorite salads is Fattoush. There are various versions of the salad, whose name comes from fatta, which refers to the crumbled or torn pieces of flatbread in the salad. But I’ve never had Fattoush with buttermilk dressing, so was intrigued when I saw a recipe for it in Falastin: A Cookbook by Sami Tamimi and Tara Wigley, a book which eloquently presents and reflects on Palestinean cuisine, its history, its people, and its culture. As soon as I got the book, the first thing I said to myself was, “This is one of the best books of the year.” It’s a great book.

A few years back, Sami told me that he was going to do a cookbook that updated the dishes and recipes of his homeland, making them relevant to today, just as he and Yotam Ottolenghi did for the diaspora of Middle Eastern foods in their previous books. Sami admits that this is a non-traditional Fattoush, one that his mother made, but likes it so much that he wanted to share it.

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