Our Tips for the Crispiest, Crunchiest, Charred-est Pizza Ever

We love ordering pizza from our favorite local slice joint or Neapolitan-style spot, but the taste of homemade pizza—especially our favorite grilled pizza recipes—is something truly special. A lightly charred crust drizzled with olive oil, a sprinkle o…

We love ordering pizza from our favorite local slice joint or Neapolitan-style spot, but the taste of homemade pizza—especially our favorite grilled pizza recipes—is something truly special. A lightly charred crust drizzled with olive oil, a sprinkle of basil leaves, a swirl of marinara sauce, and a generous amount of ooey-gooey mozzarella cheese is as simple and delicious as can be. Of course you can go all out with truffle-flavored ingredients or meat-lover toppings galore. If you’re looking for an upgrade to your summer dinner (after all, who doesn’t want a new and improved menu for entertaining family or friends?), make homemade pizza on the grill. Ahead, we’ll tell you how to do just that like a pro.

How to Grill Pizza

Any great pizza—whether wood-fried, brick-oven baked, or grilled—starts with the perfect pizza dough. You can make your own with your favorite recipe or buy store-bought from a local pizzeria. Even if you love a deep-dish or Sicilian-style pizza, now’s not the time to make an extra-large pie. Instead, Paula Disbrowe, author of Food52’s Any Night Grilling: 60 Ways to Fire Up Dinner (and More), recommends stretching the pizza dough out to ½ inch thick or less. “Place the stretched crust on a pizza peel dusted with cornmeal or semolina flour, then add your toppings right before you slide the pizza onto the hot grates,” says Disbrowe. For an extra-crispy crust, grill one side of the pizza dough first, add toppings like pizza sauce, pepperoni, meatballs, clams, or an assortment of different cheeses to the charred pizza crust, and then slide the pie (uncooked side down) back onto the grill for an additional few minutes.

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14 Flavor-Packed Recipes for the Best Korean Barbecue

There’s no barbecue quite like Korean barbecue. The glorious feast, often reserved for restaurants that specialize in the technique, is defined by air saturated with smoke and tables that quite literally sizzle, due to the grills installed smack-dab in…

There’s no barbecue quite like Korean barbecue. The glorious feast, often reserved for restaurants that specialize in the technique, is defined by air saturated with smoke and tables that quite literally sizzle, due to the grills installed smack-dab in the middle. It’s a meal that seems to never end—in addition to the food you order, such as kalbi and kimchi tofu stew, there’s a smorgasbord of complimentary banchan, or side dishes, that get constantly (and generously) refilled.

While Korean barbecue makes for an extraordinary dining out experience, it shouldn’t strictly be considered restaurant cuisine. Though it’s a multicourse meal, it’s not tough to successfully execute at home if you think beyond the humble backyard franks and patties. Korean barbecue is so customizable, fun, and easy to assemble that you can actually whip it up in your own kitchen—hybrid grilling tables not required.

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The Absolute Easiest Trick to Cleaning Your Grill

Why is it important to clean a grill? And how come leaving charred bits and leftover cooking oil doesn’t season the grates similar to a cast iron skillet? Well, first and foremost, it’s better for your health. Grilling meats at high tempera…

Why is it important to clean a grill? And how come leaving charred bits and leftover cooking oil doesn’t season the grates similar to a cast iron skillet? Well, first and foremost, it’s better for your health. Grilling meats at high temperatures can actually produce carcinogens, then left behind on the grill, so it’s important to keep the grates maintained. Beyond the health factor, regularly cleaning your grill will lengthen its life, prevent dangerous flare-ups, and simply make your food taste better.

We know that summer is officially in full swing, but here's a tip that will carry you well beyond the Fourth of July: how to clean your grill, using things you already have lying around. All you'll need for this quick hack is a piece of aluminum foil and a pair of tongs. Oh, plus your dirty grill grate and a little bit of elbow grease. 

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Is a Hot Dog a Sandwich? The Food52 Editorial Team Weighs In.

“Are hot dogs sandwiches?”

It’s the kind of question that can make your blood boil, raise your voice a few octaves higher than you knew possible, and summon strong opinions from even the shyest snacker in your friend group. Ahead of the July 4th weeke…

“Are hot dogs sandwiches?”

It’s the kind of question that can make your blood boil, raise your voice a few octaves higher than you knew possible, and summon strong opinions from even the shyest snacker in your friend group. Ahead of the July 4th weekend and the infamous Nathan’s Hot Dog Eating Contest held each year on New York’s Coney Island (I’m rooting for you, as always, Joey Chestnut), outdoor furniture retailer RTAOutdoorLiving.com surveyed 1,000 individuals in an attempt to settle the debate with no end. Reader: the results may be disturbing, so proceed at your own risk.

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Your Most Flavorful Grilled Oysters Ever, Guaranteed

Oysters on the half shell over ice is always quite nice. But oysters, hot off the grill can also be an interesting thrill, especially in summertime when your beer will seem colder because your oyster is cooked. All you have to do is choose a method for…

Oysters on the half shell over ice is always quite nice. But oysters, hot off the grill can also be an interesting thrill, especially in summertime when your beer will seem colder because your oyster is cooked. All you have to do is choose a method for grilling oysters, select the right kind of oysters (are you team east coast or west coast?), mix up a few sauces, and you're ready to host an oyster-laden cocktail hour. Whether you top grilled oysters with just a garlic butter sauce and a drizzle of fresh lemon juice, a sprinkle of kosher salt, or a sharp and tangy mignonette sauce, our guide will teach you exactly how to grill oysters and serve them with finesse.

Photo by Mark Weinburg, Graphic by Tim McSweeney

Choose A Grilling Method

There are two ways to grill an oyster in its own shell, over a hot flame. No matter which method you choose, oysters should be placed on the very hot grill grates flat shell up. Transfer the shells on and off the grill very gently using tongs.

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Grilled Portobellos Get a Glow-Up

A Big Little Recipe has the smallest-possible ingredient list and big everything else: flavor, creativity, wow factor. That means five ingredients or fewer—not including water, salt, black pepper, and certain fats (like oil and butter), since we’re gue…

A Big Little Recipe has the smallest-possible ingredient list and big everything else: flavor, creativity, wow factor. That means five ingredients or fewer—not including water, salt, black pepper, and certain fats (like oil and butter), since we're guessing you have those covered. Psst, did you hear we’re coming out with a cookbook? We’re coming out with a cookbook!


Not long after Madonna released her fourth studio album, Like a Prayer, portobellos got a glow-up.

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A Brief History of the American Cookout

There’s something almost spiritual about watching someone cook with fire: the glowing red charcoal pulsing with energy; the slow, controlled breaths sending ash fluttering into the air. Perhaps we tend to huddle around the flames to watch—whether we kn…

There’s something almost spiritual about watching someone cook with fire: the glowing red charcoal pulsing with energy; the slow, controlled breaths sending ash fluttering into the air. Perhaps we tend to huddle around the flames to watch—whether we know it or not, it’s an experience that tugs at our shared history. From a backyard hot dog in New Jersey, to razor-thin bulgogi in Seoul, to Jamaican jerk chicken, cooking with fire draws crowds among myriad cultures.

Jim Auchmutey, author of Smokelore, notes that grilling dates back to the Paleolithic era, when humans first cooked meat over open fire. There were no fancy rubs or sauces, no direct or indirect heat. Nonetheless, Dr. Richard Wrangham, a professor of biological anthropology at Harvard University, claims that the discovery of heating food altered the course of human development. In Catching Fire: How Cooking Made Us Human, Wrangham writes that “cooking was a great discovery not merely because it gave us better food, or even because it made us physically human. It did something even more important: it helped make our brains uniquely large, providing a dull human body with a brilliant human mind.” Before humans discovered cooking, our ancestors spent most of their time and energy chewing raw fibrous plants and vegetables. But their jaws and teeth were no match for raw meat. To make chewing easier, they used stone tools as “second teeth” to break down animal flesh. This was still a lot of work. According to Wrangham, once humans began cooking with fire, they were able to consume more calories with less time and effort, which supported the development of larger brains.

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Our 21 Best Side Dishes for Ribs—Because Your BBQ Deserves It

Whether they’re dry rubbed or tossed in a sticky-sweet Kansas City-style sauce that leaves stains in unexpected places, baby back ribs instantly turn up the volume on your summer gathering. Pounds of ribs laid side by side is a sight to behold—and the …

Whether they're dry rubbed or tossed in a sticky-sweet Kansas City-style sauce that leaves stains in unexpected places, baby back ribs instantly turn up the volume on your summer gathering. Pounds of ribs laid side by side is a sight to behold—and the smell of them coming right off the grill or being pulled out of the oven guarantees that neighbors will walk over uninvited to say, "what's cooking?" But hey, the more the merrier, especially when it comes to such a crowd-friendly main course like ribs.

And while the meat is plenty filling on its own, a true barbecue feast will also feature an all-star lineup of side dishes like potato salad, coleslaw, grilled summer vegetables, baked beans, sautéed greens, and a whole lot more. Here are 21 of the best side dishes to serve with ribs all summer long.

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12 Best Grilling Tools to Stock Up for the Summer

If there was a noise that marked the start of summer, what would it be? Kids splashing in a pool, or maybe the crack of a bat at a baseball stadium? Personally, I think it would be the sizzle of meat on a grill—I can’t help but associate warm weather w…

If there was a noise that marked the start of summer, what would it be? Kids splashing in a pool, or maybe the crack of a bat at a baseball stadium? Personally, I think it would be the sizzle of meat on a grill—I can’t help but associate warm weather with endless evening cookouts, surrounded by my friends and family (aka my happy place).

To prepare for the beginning of grilling season and ensure you have all the necessary supplies to pull off an amazing backyard barbecue, you’ll want to stock up on the essentials: tools, accessories, and ingredients that’ll help you step up your grilling game. Here are some of my hands-down favorite grilling items that you’ll want to snag before the season gets into full swing (they start to sell out quickly once summer is here).

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Here’s How to Properly Shut Down a Grill After a Barbecue

Inspired by conversations on the Food52 Hotline, we’re sharing tips and tricks that make navigating all of our kitchens easier and more fun.
Today: Shutting down a grill is just as important as starting it up. Read More >>

Inspired by conversations on the Food52 Hotline, we're sharing tips and tricks that make navigating all of our kitchens easier and more fun.

Today: Shutting down a grill is just as important as starting it up.

Read More >>