Under-$30 Bathroom Upgrades That Are Sleek, Stylish & Functional

We’ve teamed up with Philips Sonicare to share functional (yet beautiful!) products that’ll make your bathroom feel like a brand-new space—without spending a fortune. We’re starting by upgrading our toothbrush to the new Philips One by Sonicare. It not…

We've teamed up with Philips Sonicare to share functional (yet beautiful!) products that'll make your bathroom feel like a brand-new space—without spending a fortune. We're starting by upgrading our toothbrush to the new Philips One by Sonicare. It not only comes in four very cute colors, but it's battery-operated and super portable, thanks to a sleek carrying case you can take just about anywhere.


For a space that gets used multiple times a day, my bathroom isn't a place I think about much, in terms of style and design. On the other hand, I dream about redecorating my living room on a weekly (if not hourly) basis.

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How I Turned My Hallway Into a Dining Room

I am utterly devoted to taking dinner in the living room. I turn the TV on, let my meal grow cold by the time I find the perfect show, and hunch over the coffee table to spoon pasta in my mouth, eyes glazed over. It’s not the most refined picture, no, …

I am utterly devoted to taking dinner in the living room. I turn the TV on, let my meal grow cold by the time I find the perfect show, and hunch over the coffee table to spoon pasta in my mouth, eyes glazed over. It’s not the most refined picture, no, but it’s worked quite well for me so far. I think the main reason I’ve never liked sitting at the table to eat by myself is because I’ve never had a kitchen or dining room I loved.

My current “dining room” is really the size of a breakfast nook, and is directly off of my galley kitchen. It’s approximately 5x7’, and since it’s the only way to get from the living room to the bathroom, it functions more as a natural hallway. Being that I’ve never been one to eat at the table unless I really had to, I also never gave this space much thought. A year after moving into this apartment, though, it was ready for my attention.

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The Piece of Decor Your Kitchen Is Calling For

It’s practically undeniable at this point that kitchens are the beating heart of our homes. They’re where we gather to make delicious food, deepen our relationships, and forge new memories (not to mention hold 3 p.m. corporate brainstorms and 11 a.m. a…

It’s practically undeniable at this point that kitchens are the beating heart of our homes. They’re where we gather to make delicious food, deepen our relationships, and forge new memories (not to mention hold 3 p.m. corporate brainstorms and 11 a.m. art class). The fluidity of these spaces is of paramount importance: You have to have enough room to seat the whole family, a table that doubles as an eat/work zone, enough gizmos and gadgets to help you take on all the additional home cooking... the list goes on. But for as functional—and beautiful—as many of our kitchens are, are they truly reflective of our homes, and our style? I’d venture a guess and say maybe not.

Ask any designer and they’ll tell you the biggest impact you can make in a space is often with art. Not only does it help tie a room together, but it’s a great way for homeowners to imbue their dwellings with their unique taste and point of view. Yet, oftentimes, the kitchen is the last place we add decor layers like artwork.

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How to DIY the Easiest Art From… Leftover Cardboard

The other day I finally mustered the energy to break down and tie up all the cardboard boxes I had acquired over the course of about two months (bear in mind this was also the holiday season!) and I kid you not, my back was aching by the end of it. I m…

The other day I finally mustered the energy to break down and tie up all the cardboard boxes I had acquired over the course of about two months (bear in mind this was also the holiday season!) and I kid you not, my back was aching by the end of it. I made several trips out to the recycling can, identity concealed by my hat, mask, and sunglasses—mortified by the consumption that clearly went on in my home. I scurried back and forth (probably making myself look more suspect) with my bundles of paper and twine, feeling guilty all the while.

Usually, I’ll reuse leftover boxes as floor or table protection while doing a DIY project, and that does help me sleep better at night. However, I recently came across an even better way to repurpose cardboard: art! Yes, art!

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12 Handy Organization Ideas for Small Kitchens

My first apartment in San Francisco was a well-lit 1920s studio on California Street that had a kitchen with capacity for roughly three-fourths of one person at a time. The storage space was virtually nonexistent: I had a single, tiny wall of cabinets …

My first apartment in San Francisco was a well-lit 1920s studio on California Street that had a kitchen with capacity for roughly three-fourths of one person at a time. The storage space was virtually nonexistent: I had a single, tiny wall of cabinets abutting the stove (rendering one section of shelf inaccessible), and just one cabinet next to the kitchen sink.

But a decade later, comprising a stint at Williams-Sonoma HQ, a wedding, and two increasingly larger apartments, I’d officially amassed enough kitchen gear to stock a boutique.

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The French Pottery I’ve Spent 30 Years Collecting

An object is often worth more than its material form. It can bring with it cultural echoes, family history, and personal memory. In The Things We Treasure, writers tell us about their most priceless possessions—and the irreplaceable stories behind them…

An object is often worth more than its material form. It can bring with it cultural echoes, family history, and personal memory. In The Things We Treasure, writers tell us about their most priceless possessions—and the irreplaceable stories behind them.


I grew up in the Baby Boom years. As my parents ascended from working class to middle class, I noticed (even as a child) that there were things they acquired that were often meant to be used. They had “fancy” dishes that only saw the light of day at Thanksgiving, table linens too pristine to ever be served on, and rooms that were deemed suitable only when we had company (even though we rarely had any).

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7 Expert-Predicted Home Trends We’ll See in 2021

2020 saw its fair share of home trends, thanks to a surplus of time spent pondering our interiors—quite literally stuck staring at the design choices we might not have thought fully through. The good news is that it compelled people to take creativity …

2020 saw its fair share of home trends, thanks to a surplus of time spent pondering our interiors—quite literally stuck staring at the design choices we might not have thought fully through. The good news is that it compelled people to take creativity to new levels, and really think critically about what they want to get out of their homes.

As a result, we’ve seen the resurgence of 80s silhouettes, an increase in accent walls, a focus on the “CottageCore” aesthetic, and more. What will 2021 bring, you ask? Well, we checked in with Pinterest, home improvement site Houzz, and interior design service Modsy to see what the top design trend predictions will be in the coming year.

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The Home Trends That Got Us Through 2020

If you’ve been spending all this extra time in your house this year, and haven’t felt a startling urge to replace everything you own—I’m at once in awe and completely jealous of you. I’ve spent a ridiculous amount of time painting, rehanging shelves, r…

If you’ve been spending all this extra time in your house this year, and haven’t felt a startling urge to replace everything you own—I’m at once in awe and completely jealous of you. I’ve spent a ridiculous amount of time painting, rehanging shelves, replacing framed art, scouring Facebook marketplace for furniture to flip, and doing lots (and lots) of Tik Tok research.

One bright spot of pacing around our homes day in and day out? So many cool trends have bubbled to the surface this year, from the practical (regrowing veggies), to the superfluous (squiggly furniture), and more people than ever have taken an interest in making their homes feel… homey. Below, we’ve gathered some of our favorite decor and DIY trends from the past year, as well as some we’re still not sure about. Feel free to change our minds, though!

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A Peek Inside a Christmas-Ready 1918 Craftsman Home

Every year, blogger, shop owner, and interior stylist Jeran McConnel of Oleander and Palm and her husband Lonnie host a holiday bash at their Bakersfield, CA home. “Most people stay for hours, and our house gets loud and crowded. I bake and cook for da…

Every year, blogger, shop owner, and interior stylist Jeran McConnel of Oleander and Palm and her husband Lonnie host a holiday bash at their Bakersfield, CA home. “Most people stay for hours, and our house gets loud and crowded. I bake and cook for days leading up to it so that everything is homemade and fresh,” the multi-hyphenate Jeran tells us. This year, however, the couple has reworked not only that annual party but all of their holiday plans in order to keep their loved ones safe.

“I grew up in Papua New Guinea. When I was pregnant with my oldest child, we visited a very remote Island, and I bought an ebony-and-shell carved ornament from a local artisan. I used to hang it on the tree, but this year I got a little ornament stand at a thrift store for it. Now it has a special spot on the mantle,” McConnel tells us. Stockings by Target Photo by Oleander and Palm

A highly scaled-back guest list and a change of scenery will help keep their traditional gathering alive. The new socially-distanced setting? The front porch. “We will serve a few neighbors thermoses full of spiked citrus punch, hand out boxes of homemade treats, and give them blankets to keep them warm,” McConnel adds.

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The Best Things We Bought for Our Homes This Year

A few weeks into the lockdown in Spring—after the initial feeling of it being an involuntary staycation wore off—everything began to feel wrong about my home. That is to say, little felt right. Not the color of the walls, the material of the countertop…

A few weeks into the lockdown in Spring—after the initial feeling of it being an involuntary staycation wore off—everything began to feel wrong about my home. That is to say, little felt right. Not the color of the walls, the material of the countertops, the firmness of the mattress, or the style of the cabinet pulls. As our indoors became our entire worlds, these worlds (like the one on the outside) were showing cracks.

I rushed to buy new hallway ceiling lights (too small). I spent days torn between a cold-press and centrifugal juicer (bought a second blender, instead). Found five different pasta rollers I "most definitely needed" (I didn’t). Bought doormats and pillows and an antique mirror that fell and shattered a week later. I ended up with a drawer-full of cabinet pull samples and a paper folder exploding with wallpaper swatches.

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