Homemade Coconut Cream Pie

Homemade Coconut Cream Pie
This decadent Coconut Cream Pie is a classic! Made with a graham cracker crust, creamy coconut filling, and topped with rum-spiked whipped cream this made-from-scratch pie will be your go-to!
READ: Homemade Coconut Cream Pie

A square picture of fresh coconut pie in a glass pie plate showing the layers of graham cracker crust, coconut filling, and a whipped topping with toasted shredded coconut.

Homemade Coconut Cream Pie

This decadent Coconut Cream Pie is a classic! Made with a graham cracker crust, creamy coconut filling, and topped with rum-spiked whipped cream this made-from-scratch pie will be your go-to!

READ: Homemade Coconut Cream Pie

Hot Buttered Rum Sticky Buns

These oh-so-gooey and gloriously boozy sticky buns include all the delightful flavors of hot buttered rum baked up in a yeasty spiral of holiday cheer. Swirls of buttery soft dough, spiced sugar filling, and a gooey spiced and rum-spiked caramel glaze makes these hot buttered rum-inspired sticky buns perfect for your holiday brunch! This post […]

These oh-so-gooey and gloriously boozy sticky buns include all the delightful flavors of hot buttered rum baked up in a yeasty spiral of holiday cheer.

Swirls of buttery soft dough, spiced sugar filling, and a gooey spiced and rum-spiked caramel glaze makes these hot buttered rum-inspired sticky buns perfect for your holiday brunch!

Platter of gooey sticky buns with pecans, cups of hot buttered rum in the background

With a filling of brown sugar and festive spices, and a sweet and sticky caramel topping spiked with dark rum, not to mention ample chopped pecans for crunch and contrast, these hot buttered rum-inspired sticky buns are a feast for the senses.

You all know how I feel about boozy baking, and these gloriously gooey, sensually spiced, and ravishingly rum-soaked sticky buns are proof that adding booze to baked goods is always a good idea. It’s the kind of recipe you’ll find yourself coming back to again and again.

Hello new Christmas-morning tradition!

Gooey caramel dripping down the side of hot buttered rum sticky buns, with twinkle lights in the background

The flavor inspiration for these sticky buns comes from hot buttered rum, a popular fall and winter drink dating back to colonial times, when rum was believed to be a miraculous cure-all and ‘strengthener of the body’. In fact, a hot rum-based drink like this was probably enjoyed medicinally more often than recreationally.

A hot buttered rum is traditionally made by mixing hot water with rum, sugar, spices, and a pat of butter for added richness and a luxurious mouth feel.

It’s similar to a hot toddy, both sweetened and sometimes spiced drinks served hot, but a hot buttered rum contains the notable addition of butter and, obviously, uses rum instead of whiskey.

Platter of gooey sticky buns with pecans, cups of hot buttered rum, showing the Hot Buttered Rum packet from The Spice Hunter

Hot buttered rum recipes vary greatly in the mix and proportion of spices, but most include a mix of cinnamon, nutmeg, allspice, cardamom and cloves.

For this recipe, rather than raid the spice rack for a pinch of this and a pinch of that, we used a packet of Hot Buttered Rum drink mix from The Spice Hunter. One packet is split between the spiced sugar filling, while the rest is added to the gooey caramel topping along with a generous glug or two of dark rum.

The spice mix is already perfectly balanced, and also makes the filling part super easy (just mix with a bit of brown sugar and sprinkle away). No pinches (or measuring spoons) required!

Closeup overhead of sticky buns showing spirals and pecans

We baked a batch of these sticky buns last weekend, assuming that a somewhat complicated recipe like this would necessitate at least a second go-round to get it right (although surprisingly, other than a mishap involving a plate that was slightly too small and hot caramel everywhere, that first batch was pretty darn perfect which almost never happens). Knowing we were going to be making another batch the following weekend anyway, we made quick work of packing the still-warm buns in recycled takeout containers and delivering them to our neighbors, saving just two for ourselves.

The following day Taylor warmed one up for an afternoon snack, quickly realizing that a reheated sticky bun is indeed a fabulous afternoon stack, and immediately started lamenting the fact that we had given the rest away.

Needless to say when we made the final batch to photograph, we kept most of them for ourselves.

Forkful of hot buttered rum sticky bun on a pink plate, showing the light and fluffy texture of the dough Lifting a sticky bun off of a white platter Single hot buttered rum sticky bun on a light pink plate, with the platter of buns, twinkle lights, and a cup of buttered rum in the background

What’s the difference between a sticky bun and a cinnamon roll anyway?

Well, they both start out with a soft and yeasty dough, rolled into a tight spiral with a cinnamon-sugar filling.

The main difference is sticky buns are baked on a bed of hot, gooey caramel and chopped pecans, and then inverted immediately after baking, not unlike an upside down cake. The bottom becomes the top, the gooey caramel oozing down the sides of the buns and your fingers.

Platter of gooey sticky buns with pecans, cups of hot buttered rum and twinkle lights Overhead Platter of gooey sticky buns with pecans, cups of hot buttered rum, and christmas twinkle lights

These sticky buns are made using a dough very similar to my favorite cinnamon roll dough recipe, which I used previously for these Matcha Black Sesame Cinnamon Rolls.

The dough begins with what’s called a tangzhong, an asian technique for soft and tender yeast breads. Pre-cooking a little bit of flour and liquid like this allows the dough to better absorb more liquid, resulting in a softer, more tender final product.

The dough is easily made in about 45 minutes, including a 20 minute rest and 10 minutes of kneading in a mixer to form a soft and silky smooth dough. While you can let the dough rise and then roll it out, I prefer to refrigerate the dough overnight and assemble the following day. Refrigerating the dough makes it a bit stiffer and easier to work with.

Rolling out the sticky bun dough Sprinkling the spiced sugar filling on the dough Rolling up the dough Pinching the seam to seal it Measuring out where to make the cuts Cut using thread or dental floss for super clean cuts

When cutting your rolls, use a piece of unflavored dental floss or sturdy thread to slice the dough as if it were clay. This results in far cleaner cuts than even the sharpest serrated knife, and no squishing either.

Pouring the spiced caramel topping into the pan Sprinkle pecans over caramel topping in pan Arrange rolls on top of caramel and pecans in pan

Once rolled and cut, the buns are arranged in the baking pan on a bed of gooey, rum-spiked caramel and chopped pecans. Much like an upside down cake, this gooey bottom layer will ultimately become the tops of the buns.

Split screen before/after the final rise

While I prefer to let the dough rise overnight and assemble the morning of, if you started your dough earlier the previous day, you can also roll and assemble the buns in the pan the night before. Cover tightly and refrigerate overnight. In the morning they should be noticeably puffy as pictured above. Let them sit at room temperature as you preheat the oven and then bake. If you’re aiming for a breakfast of sticky buns as opposed to a brunch, this might be a more feasible schedule.

Rolls after the final rise, they should be puffy and just touching each other

After baking, the buns are immediately inverted onto a platter, the caramel base becoming the gooey top of the bun.

You want to do this while the buns are still hot, which means that the caramel is still dangerously hot, so please be careful when inverting your buns. I like to use a set of silicone-gripped grill gloves, which allow me to grip onto the pan much easier than a normal oven mit.

You can use a large rimmed plate, baking sheet, or a cutting board with a groove in it (the groove will catch any overflow). Invert the platter on top of the baking pan, put a hand firmly on top of the platter and on the bottom of the pan, and quickly flip the whole arrangement upside down. Then gently lift up the pan, the buns should release easily (if the caramel cools too much it could get sticky).

Platter of gooey sticky buns with dish of pecans and a cup of hot buttered rum in the background

This recipe is for a small batch, yielding 9 buns that’ll perfectly fit in a 9-inch square baking pan. You can use a 9 or 10-inch round baking pan, although you may only have space for 8 buns in that case (you could always bake the straggler in its own ramekin with a spoonful or two of caramel sauce in the bottom if you like!)

This recipe can also be doubled and baked in a 13-by-9-inch baking pan as well.

Single hot buttered rum sticky bun on a light pink plate, with the platter of buns and a cup of buttered rum in the background

Any leftover buns should be covered and refrigerated. Reheat for a few seconds in the microwave or pop it in a warm oven for a few minutes until warmed through, and enjoy!

Hot Buttered Rum Sticky Buns

Hot Buttered Rum Sticky Buns

Your favorite warm holiday cocktail is transformed into deliciously gooey sticky buns spiked with rum and fragrant holiday spices.

Ingredients:

Thangzhong:

  • 3 tablespoons (42mL) filtered water
  • 3 tablespoons (42mL) whole milk
  • 2 tablespoons (16g) all-purpose flour

Dough:

  • ¼ cup (½ stick, 56g) unsalted butter, cut into cubes
  • ½ cup (120mL) whole milk
  • 2 large egg yolks, at room temperature
  • 2 ¼ cups (281g) all-purpose flour
  • 1 tablespoon (8g) dry whole milk powder
  • 1 ½ teaspoons (6g) instant yeast
  • 1 tablespoon (25g) granulated sugar
  • 1 ½ teaspoons kosher salt

Topping:

  • 5 tablespoons (70g) unsalted butter
  • 2/3 cup (147g) packed light brown sugar
  • 1/2 packet (31g) The Spice Hunter Hot Buttered Rum drink mix
  • 1/4 teaspoon kosher salt
  • 2 tablespoons (40g) golden syrup, light corn syrup, or honey
  • 3 tablespoons (42mL) heavy cream
  • 3 tablespoons dark rum or 1 teaspoon rum extract
  • 3/4 cup (85g) chopped pecans

Filling:

Directions:

For dough:

  1. Start by preparing  your flour paste or tangzhong: combine water, milk and flour in a small saucepan set over medium heat. Whisk gently until no clumps remain. Continue to whisk until the mixture thickens to the consistency of thick paste, about 2 to 3 minutes. Remove from heat.
  2. Add cubes of butter to still-warm saucepan with flour paste and gently whisk until melted and smooth, then whisk in milk. Add in the egg yolks and whisk until fully incorporated. At this point the mixture should feel lukewarm to the touch.
  3. In the bowl of a stand mixer fitted with the dough hook, whisk together the flour, powdered milk, and yeast to combine. Pour in the lukewarm flour paste, and mix on low speed until mixture forms a shaggy dough, about 1 to 2 minutes. Cover bowl with plastic wrap and let rest for 20 minutes (this rest gives the flour a chance to absorb the liquid, making it easier to knead later).
  4. Remove plastic wrap and add the sugar and salt. Mix on medium-low speed until dough is smooth and elastic, but still somewhat sticky, about 10 minutes. Add more flour only if absolutely necessary (a softer initial dough will result in a softer final product).
  5. Shape the dough into a ball (lightly oil your hands if necessary) and place in a lightly greased bowl. Cover with plastic wrap or a kitchen towel and allow to rise in a warm place until doubled in volume, about 1 to 1 1/2 hours. Alternatively, if you want to bake your rolls the next day, tightly cover the bowl with plastic wrap and pop it in the refrigerator to rise slowly overnight (my preference, as cold dough is so much easier to work roll out and shape).

For Topping:

  1. Melt butter in a small saucepan over medium heat. Add brown sugar, salt, and spice mix and stir until smooth and paste-like (it may appear slightly separated, that’s ok).
  2. Remove from heat. Whisk in syrup and heavy cream until smooth, followed by rum. Set aside and let cool to lukewarm (topping can also be made the day ahead of time, cover and refrigerate until ready to use, and return to room temperature before using).

To Assemble:

  1. Lightly butter a 9-inch square cake pan.
  2. In a small bowl, whisk together brown sugar and remaining half packet of spice drink mix and set aside.
  3. Turn dough out onto a lightly floured work surface. Pat into a rectangle, then roll out evenly into a rectangle approximately 10 inches tall by 13 ½ inches wide. You want this piece to have an even overall thickness, with as square edges as possible.
  4. Soften butter until it is nearly melted; it should be the consistency of warm peanut butter. Using a pastry brush, spread a thick layer of butter evenly over the entire piece of dough.
  5. Sprinkle an even layer of filling over butter, leaving a 1-inch space empty along the top long edge. Pat down filling to adhere it. You can also gently run a rolling pin over the surface to compress the filling into the dough, making it easier to roll up.
  6. Working with the long edge nearest you, start to roll up the dough fairly tightly, taking care not to stretch out the ends too much. Pinch along the edge of the dough to seal the seam, then roll the seam so it is face down.
  7. Using a ruler, measure out where you will cut your rolls, using a small knife to mark the cuts. I cut my log into 9 rolls each 1 ½ inches wide.
  8. To cut the rolls, you can use a sharp serrated knife (try to cut cleanly through in one movement front to back, rather than sawing it back and forth). You can also wrap a piece of unflavored dental floss or sturdy thread around the dough, which will create perfect, clean cuts.
  9. Pour cooled topping mixture into prepared cake pan. Sprinkle evenly with chopped pecans.
  10. Place rolls into pan, leaving an even amount of space between rolls and between the edges of the pan. Lightly cover and set pan in a warm spot (I like to use my oven with the light on) until rolls are noticeably puffed and just touching one another, about 30 to 60 minutes.
  11. While rolls are rising, preheat oven to 350 degrees F.
  12. Once rolls are nearly doubled in size, bake for 30 to 35 minutes, or until tops are lightly golden brown and filling is bubbly (to be precise, the center of the center roll should read about 190 degrees F on an instant-read thermometer). If your rolls are browning too quickly, you can tent them with foil and return to the oven to continue baking.
  13. Remove rolls from oven, and immediately (and carefully!) invert onto a rimmed platter or baking sheet, or a cutting board with a groove to catch the excess caramel. Be very careful doing this as the caramel is extremely hot; I find using some silicone-grip oven mits to be very helpful.
  14. Let rolls cool slightly before serving. Rolls also reheat beautifully; keep covered in the refrigerator then rewarm for a few minutes in the oven or a few seconds in the microwave before serving.
All images and text © Lindsay Landis /

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A Wintry Rum Cocktail to Sip Beside the Fire

We’ve partnered with Santa Teresa 1796—a dry, refined rum crafted in Caracas, Venezuela—to share a winter-ready sipper you’ll want to stir up all season long: a rum-forward riff on the classic Martinez cocktail from Maine-based bartender Harper Fendler…

We’ve partnered with Santa Teresa 1796—a dry, refined rum crafted in Caracas, Venezuela—to share a winter-ready sipper you’ll want to stir up all season long: a rum-forward riff on the classic Martinez cocktail from Maine-based bartender Harper Fendler.


With the temperature dropping here in Maine, I’m beginning to layer up. The boots and heavier jacket are a given, but come winter, I like to have something to warm the soul, too.

Read More >>

Classic Mojito

Finally! I’ve figured out how to make the perfect homemade mojito. Mojitos are bubbly rum cocktails that taste minty-fresh, citrusy and a little sweet. Club soda stretches…

The post Classic Mojito appeared first on Cookie and Kate.

best mojito recipe

Finally! I’ve figured out how to make the perfect homemade mojito. Mojitos are bubbly rum cocktails that taste minty-fresh, citrusy and a little sweet. Club soda stretches out the flavors to create an afternoon-worthy sipper. Mojitos are ultra refreshing on warm days, and I feel like I’m on vacation every time I get my hands on one.

Mojitos originated in Cuba and I hope to taste a real one someday. We enjoyed Cuban-style mojitos in Miami over a long Valentine’s weekend earlier this year. Mojitos happen to be the only cocktail my husband will drink (he’s usually more of a beer and wine guy). I studied the bartenders’ methods while we were there so I could learn how to make them at home.

At Old’s Havana, they lined up highball glasses all the way down the bar, added a generous spoonful of sugar to each, followed by several sprigs of fresh mint (or yerba buena, as they call it). They mixed the mojitos in the glasses by the order, garnishing them with real sugar cane. I swizzled my drink and swayed to the beat of lively Latin string music playing just a few feet away. I honestly don’t know if it was an authentic or manufactured Miami experience, but it was magical nonetheless.

mojito ingredients

Outside of Miami, great mojitos can be hard to come by. Many bars don’t keep fresh mint on hand so they’ll turn down the request, and my own homemade attempts over the years have been lackluster. Now that I’ve studied and practiced my mojito technique, I’m excited to share my mojito recipe with you today!

Turns out, you just need five basic ingredients (mint, lime, sugar, rum and club soda) and a few simple tips to make the best mojito you’ve ever had. You won’t even need a shaker or simple syrup for this classic mojito recipe. Cheers to a long weekend!

Continue to the recipe...

The post Classic Mojito appeared first on Cookie and Kate.

2-Ingredient Piña Colada Smoothie

Nothing tastes like summer or a day at the beach like a piña colada. Our simple version requires just 2 ingredients: frozen ripe pineapple and coconut milk.
Let us show you how it’s done, plus easy ways to add protein if enjoying as a smoothie, or boo…

2-Ingredient Piña Colada Smoothie

Nothing tastes like summer or a day at the beach like a piña colada. Our simple version requires just 2 ingredients: frozen ripe pineapple and coconut milk.

Let us show you how it’s done, plus easy ways to add protein if enjoying as a smoothie, or booze if enjoying as a cocktail. 

What Is a Piña Colada?

The piña colada is a frozen blended drink that originated in Puerto Rico.

2-Ingredient Piña Colada Smoothie from Minimalist Baker →

Jungle Bird

The Jungle Bird is a tropical rum cocktail with a twist! Bitter Campari offsets sweet pineapple juice to make a balanced, refreshing mixed drink. Love fruity drinks but want something more complex? Here’s the drink for you: the Jungle Bird! It’s one of the few rum cocktails to pair tropical flavors with an Italian bitter: Campari. You might know Campari from the ubiquitous Negroni: an ultra dry and bitter drink. But add it to a tropical drink and the effect is surprising. Campari perfectly balances the drink and gives the finish an intriguing complexity. In fact, it’s become a favorite around here…and that’s saying something, given our extensive library of cocktails. It hits all the right notes: sweet, tart, fruity, and bitter. What’s a Jungle Bird cocktail? The Jungle Bird is a tropical cocktail made with rum, pineapple juice, and Campari. The story goes that it was invented in 1978 at the Aviary bar of the Kuala Lumpur Hilton. The telltale sign it’s that it’s modern: it fuses the Italian bitter Campari with the tropical flavors. This drink recently surged in popularity, fueled by the Negroni craze. The drink is often garnished with pineapple leaves to mimic the feathers of […]

A Couple Cooks – Healthy, Whole Food, & Vegetarian Recipes

The Jungle Bird is a tropical rum cocktail with a twist! Bitter Campari offsets sweet pineapple juice to make a balanced, refreshing mixed drink.

Jungle bird

Love fruity drinks but want something more complex? Here’s the drink for you: the Jungle Bird! It’s one of the few rum cocktails to pair tropical flavors with an Italian bitter: Campari. You might know Campari from the ubiquitous Negroni: an ultra dry and bitter drink. But add it to a tropical drink and the effect is surprising. Campari perfectly balances the drink and gives the finish an intriguing complexity. In fact, it’s become a favorite around here…and that’s saying something, given our extensive library of cocktails. It hits all the right notes: sweet, tart, fruity, and bitter.

What’s a Jungle Bird cocktail?

The Jungle Bird is a tropical cocktail made with rum, pineapple juice, and Campari. The story goes that it was invented in 1978 at the Aviary bar of the Kuala Lumpur Hilton. The telltale sign it’s that it’s modern: it fuses the Italian bitter Campari with the tropical flavors. This drink recently surged in popularity, fueled by the Negroni craze. The drink is often garnished with pineapple leaves to mimic the feathers of a bird. The ingredients in a Jungle Bird cocktail are:

  • Dark rum
  • Pineapple juice
  • Campari
  • Lime juice
  • Simple syrup
Jungle bird cocktail

Dark rum vs light rum: what’s the difference?

The Jungle Bird uses dark rum: something altogether different than the light rum you’ve got for daiquiris and piña coladas. Here’s a breakdown of the differences:

  • Dark rum is aged longer than white rum. It has a dark color and a developed flavor with caramel notes.
  • Light rum or white rum is clear and has a smoother, sweeter flavor than dark rum.

Can you use light rum in a Jungle Bird? Sure. It won’t taste quite the same, but it’s similar. Of course if you’re a purist: go grab a bottle of dark rum!

All about Campari

Campari is an Italian bitter with a bright red color! It’s easy to find, most famously used in the Negroni and other classic cocktails like the Americano and Boulevardier.

What does Campari taste like? It’s tastes bitter, fruity, and spicy all at once. It’s infused with different herbs and fruits, part of a secret recipe. Fun fact: Campari was originally colored so brightly red due to a dye made of crushed insects! That’s no longer in the modern recipe, so it shouldn’t deter you from grabbing a bottle.

Campari

How to make a Jungle Bird

It’s quick and easy to make a Jungle Bird once you’ve got all the ingredients on hand! It’s a typical shaken cocktail that you’ll shake in a

  • Shake in a cocktail shaker. Place all ingredients in a cocktail shaker, add ice, and shake (Don’t have one? Use a mason jar!)
  • Strain into a glass and garnish. Strain the drink into a lowball glass. Garnish with a pineapple wedge. If you happen to have the pineapple leaves on hand, they make a great garnish evocative of bird feathers.

More Campari cocktails

Love Campari? There are so many interesting drinks with this Italian liqueur to try outside of the Negroni. Here are some great Campari cocktails to test out:

  • Negroni Sbagliato A spin on the classic cocktail using sparkling wine instead of gin. It’s bitter, sweet, and bubbly all at once.
  • Old Pal Cocktail A three ingredient cocktail that’s sleek and sippable, balancing bitter and sweet with fiery whiskey.
  • Mezcal Negroni The way the smoke of mezcal balances the bitter Campari makes an even better drink.
  • Campari Spritz Bitter and bubbly, this cocktail mixes the popular aperativo with sparkling wine and soda water.
Jungle bird

When to serve a Jungle Bird

The Jungle Bird is a festive and fun cocktail, great for parties or a laid back evening! It’s great as a:

  • Summer drink
  • Signature drink
  • Cocktail hour drink
  • Party drink
  • Happy hour drink
  • Dinner party drink
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Jungle bird

Jungle Bird Cocktail (with Campari!)


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  • Author: Sonja Overhiser
  • Prep Time: 5 minutes
  • Cook Time: 0 minutes
  • Total Time: 5 minutes
  • Yield: 1 drink
  • Diet: Vegan

Description

The Jungle Bird is a tropical rum cocktail with a twist! Bitter Campari offsets sweet pineapple juice to make a balanced, refreshing mixed drink.


Ingredients

  • 1 1/2 ounces (3 tablespoons) dark rum
  • 1 1/2 ounces (3 tablespoons) pineapple juice
  • 3/4 to 1 ounce (2 tablespoons) Campari (to taste)
  • 1/2 ounce (1 tablespoon) lime juice
  • 1/2 ounce (1 tablespoon) simple syrup or maple syrup
  • For the garnish: Pineapple wedge, pineapple leaves (optional)

Instructions

  1. Add the dark rum, pineapple juice, Campari, lime juice, and simple syrup to a cocktail shaker and fill it with ice. Shake vigorously until cold.
  2. Strain into cocktail glass. Garnish with a pineapple wedge, pineapple leaves, or fresh mint.

  • Category: Drink
  • Method: Cocktails
  • Cuisine: American

Keywords: Jungle Bird, Rum cocktail

More rum drinks

Love mixed drinks with rum? Here are a few more to add to your repertoire:

A Couple Cooks - Healthy, Whole Food, & Vegetarian Recipes

Salted Mojito Watermelon Wedges.

The hottest days of the year are here and so are mojito watermelon wedges! Just in time!  I’m back with one more embarrassingly easy recipe for you before the 4th! I know we already discussed sheet pan s’mores, but if you haven’t soaked your watermelon wedges in mojito syrup yet, are you really living? No. […]

The post Salted Mojito Watermelon Wedges. appeared first on How Sweet Eats.

The hottest days of the year are here and so are mojito watermelon wedges!

salted mojito watermelon wedges

Just in time! 

pouring mojito syrup on watermelon

I’m back with one more embarrassingly easy recipe for you before the 4th! I know we already discussed sheet pan s’mores, but if you haven’t soaked your watermelon wedges in mojito syrup yet, are you really living?

No. I think not.

And wait! Just and FYI that you don’t really NEED the rum for this recipe to be so refreshing and incredible. Leave it out if you don’t drink or want to make this for the kids. It’s still just as good because it’s loaded with fresh mint and lime! 

watermelon soaking in mojito syrup

Here’s how it goes down.

Slice your watermelon into triangles. Well, honestly? Slice the watermelon however you want! However is easiest for you. You could do cubes or even melon balls. I’m doing wedges because right now at this moment in my life I find them the cutest.

That is what 2020 has turned into… me deciding that watermelon wedges are cute. 

salted mojito watermelon wedges

You’re also going to make a quick mojito syrup. This is just water, lime juice, maybe rum, sugar, lime zest and fresh mint. All simmered together and then poured over the watermelon.

YES.

We’re going to soak the watermelon in the mojito syrup. Throw a sheet pan in the fridge and let the watermelon hang out in the syrup.

Honestly can’t even tell you right now how much I’d like to be a wedge of watermelon just relaxing on a platter of mojito syrup.

Sounds heavenly. 

I’ve seen people soak watermelon wedges in tequila before (I mean, OMG, yes please) so I figured the mojito flavor would be a huge winner. And it totally is!

These are SO good on a hot summer day. They are cold and fresh with hints of lime and mint. And easy! And cute. Of course. 

salted mojito watermelon wedges

Watermelon Mojito Wedges

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Watermelon Mojito Wedges

These mojito watermelon wedges are soaked in a fresh mint and lime syrup then sprinkled with flaked sea salt. They are so refreshing!
Course Snack
Cuisine American
Prep Time 25 minutes
Cook Time 5 minutes
Resting Time 30 minutes
Total Time 1 hour
Servings 12 to 16 wedges
Author How Sweet Eats

Ingredients

  • 1 small seedless watermelon, cut into wedges (12 to 16 wedges)
  • 1 cup sugar
  • 3/4 cup water
  • ¼ cup white rum, optional, leave out/replace with water to make kid friendly
  • 2 tablespoons fresh lime juice
  • 1 big handful of fresh mint
  • 2 limes, zest freshly grated
  • flaked sea salt, for sprinkling

Instructions

  • Cut the watermelon into wedges and place it on two baking sheets in a single layer.
  • Place the water, sugar, lime juice, rum, mint and the zest of 1 lime in a saucepan. Heat over medium heat, whisking so the sugar dissolves. Cook until just simmering then remove it from the heat and let it cool to room temperature. Pour the mixture evenly over the watermelon in the baking sheet. Move the watermelon wedges around so they are submerged in the syrup, then flip them.
  • Refrigerate for 30 to 60 minutes. I like to flip the watermelon once while it’s in the fridge.
  • Remove the watermelon from the syrup and place it on a platter. Sprinkle on the remaining lime zest. Sprinkle on a bit of flaked salt and serve!
  • As a note, you can do this on an as-needed basis. Just use a few slices of watermelon and pour some of the syrup over top, storing the rest in the fridge until ready to use.

salted mojito watermelon wedges

Tastes like summmmmer.

The post Salted Mojito Watermelon Wedges. appeared first on How Sweet Eats.

El Presidente cocktail

Note: I’ll be making this cocktail today at 6pm CET (Noon ET, 9am PT) on my IG Live Apéro Hour on Instagram. To watch, head to my profile on my IG profile page at that time, and when the circle around my profile pic says “Live” – click on it to tune in. And on Tuesday, May 26th, my guest will be Pierre-Olivier Rousseaux, owner…

Note: I’ll be making this cocktail today at 6pm CET (Noon ET, 9am PT) on my IG Live Apéro Hour on Instagram. To watch, head to my profile on my IG profile page at that time, and when the circle around my profile pic says “Live” – click on it to tune in. And on Tuesday, May 26th, my guest will be Pierre-Olivier Rousseaux, owner of Dolin vermouth, who will explain how vermouth is made, how to use and store it, and answer your other questions. More info, as well as how to watch it in replay in my IGTV channel archives, is here.

People sometimes pick up vermouth blanc, called bianco vermouth in Italian, and don’t realize until the open the bottle that the vermouth is sweet, when they thought they were buying dry vermouth. Don’t worry if it happened to you; it happened to a friend one mine too, who happens to be a notable spirits writer. On the upside, you’ve now got one of the principal ingredients for one of my new favorite cocktails, the El Presidente.

Continue Reading El Presidente cocktail...

Bananas Foster Banana Bread

Banana bread meets classic Bananas Foster in this mouth-watering mashup. Made with caramelized sugar and bananas and a splash of dark rum, it’s a tantalizing twist you’ll simply adore. While it might look like a normal loaf of banana bread, this loaf features something extra special: a rich caramelized banana base and a glug or […]

Banana bread meets classic Bananas Foster in this mouth-watering mashup. Made with caramelized sugar and bananas and a splash of dark rum, it’s a tantalizing twist you’ll simply adore.

While it might look like a normal loaf of banana bread, this loaf features something extra special: a rich caramelized banana base and a glug or two of dark rum.

Sliced Bananas Foster Banana Bread with knife and pecans and a glass of milk

I am, apparently, in a breakfast-baked-goods sort of mood. I’m not craving cookies or cakes or brownies; no, all I’ve wanted to bake these last few weeks are muffins, coffee cakes, and, obviously banana bread.

Clearly I’m not alone in this last craving… as evidenced by the fact that Instagram is basically 32% banana bread these days.

I can’t quite explain it. Maybe it’s the fact that none of us can get to the store as often to replenish our fresh bananas, so when we do get out, we buy two bunches instead of one, without quite realizing that, no matter how green they were when we bought them, we can’t feasibly eat two bunches before they start to get spotty.

That’s actually good news, though, because, when it comes to banana bread, the spottier the bananas, the better. In fact, I’d argue that yellow bananas with black spots aren’t quite ripe enough—rather, the bananas should be the opposite: black with yellow spots—that’s when you know they’re perfect for banana bread.

Pro tip: if you find yourself with more than 2 or 3 spotty bananas at once, they freeze beautifully. Just peel, place in a labeled zip-top bag, and freeze for up to 6 months. And next time the banana bread (or banana muffins or banana cake) craving hits, all you need to do is let them defrost for about an hour or so, until they are soft (but not runny; drain of any excess liquid if there is any), and then mash them into your favorite banana bread recipe (which, if I have anything to do with it, will be this one).

Slice of Bananas Foster Banana Bread on a plate with a bowl of chopped pecans and a glass of milk.

So what makes this banana bread different from every other recipe out there?

Caramelizing together the brown sugar, butter, and banana beforehand gives this banana bread and extra special depth of flavor, and superb moistness that lasts for days. While you might not notice a difference just tasting it, I’m sure if you compared it to a loaf made in the standard way, you’d definitely notice a difference.

The process does take a bit longer than your standard banana bread, since the caramel mixture needs time to cool otherwise it’d scramble the eggs on contact (I don’t think I need to tell you that that would be no bueno). It’s not any harder than basic banana bread as any extra time involved is entirely inactive (is it a coincidence that 45 minutes is the exact length of an episode of Outlander? I think not.)

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Daiquiri Cocktail

[Note: Today’s guest on my Apéro Hour on IG Live will be distiller and founder of Pierre Ferrand cognac, Citadelle gin and Plantation rum, Alexandre Gabriel. Tune in April 22 at 6pm CET, Noon ET and 9am PT. Visit here for instructions on how to watch live. Because this will be a split-screen video, you can only watch it in replay in my Instagram Stories…

[Note: Today’s guest on my Apéro Hour on IG Live will be distiller and founder of Pierre Ferrand cognac, Citadelle gin and Plantation rum, Alexandre Gabriel. Tune in April 22 at 6pm CET, Noon ET and 9am PT. Visit here for instructions on how to watch live. Because this will be a split-screen video, you can only watch it in replay in my Instagram Stories within 24hrs after it’s originally aired.]

Since the confinement started, I’ve been doing a daily Apéro Hour on Instagram Live, archiving some of the episodes on my IGTV channel. Since I’ve never been able to get a tv show of my own, I decided just to do my own. (What could go wrong? And even so, what happens during confinement, stays in confinement. Right?) And when you’re the boss…and the producer, talent booker, presenter, cameraman, mixologist, and dishwasher…you get to call the shots. So I did, and invited some of my favorite bartenders, cocktail writers, and spirit-makers to come and talk about what they do.

Due to quirk in the platform, split-screen interviews can’t be archived (so I don’t get to call all the shots…) but it’s been really fun having people on that you might not normally get to meet, like my friend Mat who distills brandy and gin in Burgundy, Margot who owns Combat, a great cocktail bar in Paris, David from Belleville Brûlerie who showed us how to make the perfect café crème with a moka pot, and Alexandre Gabriel, who not only distills cognac and Citadelle gin, but also owns Plantation rum.

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