The Vinegary Bliss of Balsamic Chicken

A Big Little Recipe has the smallest-possible ingredient list and big everything else: flavor, creativity, wow factor. That means five ingredients or fewer—not including water, salt, black pepper, and certain fats (like oil and butter), since we’re gue…

A Big Little Recipe has the smallest-possible ingredient list and big everything else: flavor, creativity, wow factor. That means five ingredients or fewer—not including water, salt, black pepper, and certain fats (like oil and butter), since we're guessing you have those covered. Psst, did you hear we’re coming out with a cookbook? We’re coming out with a cookbook!


Though balsamic vinegar has been around for centuries, it didn’t catch on in the United States until the late 1970s, when an entrepreneur named Chuck Williams started selling the little-known Modena specialty at his little-known San Francisco store, Williams-Sonoma.

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Easy Homemade Ketchup (Naturally Sweetened)

Could you tell by now that we’re sauce people? It’s a full-on obsession. And one of our most favorite sauces is ketchup, because fries exist and they can’t be eaten dry — that’s just a fact. That and burgers + ketchup = match made in heaven.
However, …

Easy Homemade Ketchup (Naturally Sweetened)

Could you tell by now that we’re sauce people? It’s a full-on obsession. And one of our most favorite sauces is ketchup, because fries exist and they can’t be eaten dry — that’s just a fact. That and burgers + ketchup = match made in heaven.

However, we hadn’t perfected a homemade ketchup yet, so we got to work. We tested so many variations: tomato purée vs. tomato paste, fresh onion vs.

Easy Homemade Ketchup (Naturally Sweetened) from Minimalist Baker →

Strawberry Brussels Sprouts Salad

My Shaved Brussels Sprouts Salad is one of my all-time favorite salads. If you’ve tried it, you know it’s amazing. Well, I decided to create a twist on the classic Brussels sprouts salad and make a version that is perfect for spring and sum…

My Shaved Brussels Sprouts Salad is one of my all-time favorite salads. If you’ve tried it, you know it’s amazing. Well, I decided to create a twist on the classic Brussels sprouts salad and make a version that is perfect for spring and summer. You are going to LOVE this Strawberry Brussels Sprouts Salad with…

The post Strawberry Brussels Sprouts Salad appeared first on Two Peas & Their Pod.

Chinese Cooking Wine Brings Tangy Depth to, Well…Everything

I love cooking with alcohol. The magnificent aromas, the satisfying glug of rich liquid pouring from the bottle, and, of course, the drinking. Sure, French cooking gets well-deserved attention for its liberal use of wine, and Japanese cooking wouldn’t …

I love cooking with alcohol. The magnificent aromas, the satisfying glug of rich liquid pouring from the bottle, and, of course, the drinking. Sure, French cooking gets well-deserved attention for its liberal use of wine, and Japanese cooking wouldn’t be nearly as delicious without mirin and sake, but there are few places where alcohol is used as effectively, or as liberally, as in Chinese cuisines. If your pantry (or liquor cabinet) is short a bottle of Chinese wine, for cooking and for drinking, it’s time to fix that. And we’re here to help.

What Is Chinese Cooking Wine?

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Quick Pickled Red Onions

Tart, tangy, and fantastically fuchsia, these pickled red onions are quick and easy and stored in the fridge, no canning required! Pickled red onions are the perfect garnish for just about anything, from tacos to burgers to grilled chicken and more. They add bright flavor and a kick of acid to any dish they embellish. […]

The post Quick Pickled Red Onions first appeared on Love and Olive Oil.

Tart, tangy, and fantastically fuchsia, these pickled red onions are quick and easy and stored in the fridge, no canning required!

Pickled red onions are the perfect garnish for just about anything, from tacos to burgers to grilled chicken and more. They add bright flavor and a kick of acid to any dish they embellish.

Two jars of pickled red onions in glass jars on a marble background

Technically, I’ve posted quick pickled red onion recipes before, but always as a part of another recipe (like these pulled pork tacos or these loaded nachos).

But the thing is, this recipe is so easy and so versatile, it really deserves a post of its own.

Two lidded glass mason jars filled with Quick Pickled Red Onions

This is a very basic recipe, with little more than salt, sugar, peppercorns and vinegar.

Consider this a foundation for flavor, if you will. It’s perfect as is, but if you’re feeling frisky can mix it up with some fresh garlic cloves, maybe a sliced red chili or pepper flakes for a bit of spice, mustard seeds or some fresh herbs, even. Or maybe add a spoonful of gochujang for a kimchi-like twist.

You can also mix and match vinegars here. I like to use half white vinegar and half cider vinegar, but red wine vinegar would be lovely as would a little bit of champagne, rice vinegar or even a small splash of balsamic (though you would muddy the gorgeous garnet hue of the onions with that last one.)

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Homemade Butter Biscuits

Big homemade weekend breakfasts are one of my favorite things ever and no weekend breakfast is complete without homemade biscuits. These butter biscuits are my “basic” biscuit recipe that I’ve been using for years. They’re quick, simple, and perfect alongside some fried eggs and bacon. Slather on some butter and honey, or maybe your favorite […]

The post Homemade Butter Biscuits appeared first on Budget Bytes.

Big homemade weekend breakfasts are one of my favorite things ever and no weekend breakfast is complete without homemade biscuits. These butter biscuits are my “basic” biscuit recipe that I’ve been using for years. They’re quick, simple, and perfect alongside some fried eggs and bacon. Slather on some butter and honey, or maybe your favorite jam, and enjoy your morning. That’s breakfast heaven. 

Originally posted 7-27-2010, updated 3-31-2021.

Side view of baked butter biscuits on a baking sheet close up

What are Butter Biscuits?

Butter biscuits are a tender, flakey quick bread that is often served with breakfast, or sometimes as a side dish with other meals (similar to what is known as a scone in the rest of the world). I’m calling them “butter” biscuits because this recipe uses butter in the dough, unlike my Freezer Biscuits, which use heavy cream. Both recipes make great biscuits, but the method and texture of the final biscuit are different. These butter biscuits are a bit more sturdy than the cream biscuits and will hold up better to something heavy like sausage and gravy. 

The Biscuit Method

This recipe uses a cooking technique called The Biscuit Method. This technique involves working butter or another solid fat into flour. When fat is combined with flour in this way the fat prevents the flour from forming a gluten matrix (like you have with kneaded bread), which leaves the dough quite soft and tender. To keep your biscuits as soft and tender as possible, you’ll want to avoid kneading the dough and work with it as little as possible as you shape and cut your biscuits. You can read more about the mechanics of the biscuit method here

Use Buttermilk for More Flavor

The recipe below uses a buttermilk substitute (milk + vinegar or lemon juice) because I don’t often have buttermilk on hand. But if by rare chance you do have buttermilk use that in place of the milk and vinegar and you’ll have the most delicious biscuits ever. While buttermilk substitutes provide the same acidity as buttermilk, they don’t quite have as much flavor.

Butter Biscuits are Freezer Friendly

If you have a smaller household don’t skip this recipe just because it makes 8 biscuits! You can either freeze the baked biscuits or freeze the unbaked biscuits to cook later. To freeze the unbaked biscuits, simply freeze them on a lined baking sheet until solid, then transfer to a freezer bag. Label, date, and freeze up to three months. to Bake from frozen, simply add a few minutes to the baking time. 

To freeze the baked biscuits, allow them to cool completely to room temperature. Place them in a freezer bag and freeze up to three months. Thaw at room temperature or microwave for 15-30 seconds.

Two butter biscuits on a plate, one sliced open and topped with butter and honey

 

Side view of baked biscuits on a baking sheet

Homemade Butter Biscuits

These classic homemade butter biscuits are simple and delicious. Perfect for slathering with butter, honey, or your favorite jam! 
Total Cost $1.80 recipe / $0.23 serving
Prep Time 30 minutes
Cook Time 15 minutes
Total Time 45 minutes
Servings 8
Calories 237.85kcal
Author Beth - Budget Bytes

Ingredients

  • 6 Tbsp butter (salted) $0.84
  • 2.5 cups all-purpose flour $0.39
  • 1 Tbsp baking powder $0.06
  • 1/2 tsp baking soda $0.02
  • 3/4 tsp salt $0.05
  • 1 cup whole milk $0.38
  • 1 Tbsp vinegar* $0.06

Instructions

  • Freeze the butter for 30-60 minutes before you begin the recipe to make it extra cold and more solid for grating.
  • Preheat the oven to 425ºF. In a large bow, combine the flour, baking powder, baking soda, and salt. Stir until well combined.
  • Use a cheese grater to grate the butter into the bowl with the flour. Once grated, use your hands to work the butter into the flour until it resembles cornmeal.
  • Stir the vinegar into the milk. Pour the milk into the bowl with the butter and flour mixture, then stir until a dough forms.
  • Place the dough on a lightly floured surface, then press it into a large rectangle. Fold the dough in on itself in thirds, like folding a letter. Then press it into a rectangle once again, about ½ to ¾-inch thick.
  • Use a biscuit cutter or a drinking glass (about 3-inches in diameter) to cut biscuits out of the dough. Gather up the scraps, press them down again, and cut a few more biscuits until all of the dough is used up.
  • Place the biscuits on a parchment lined baking sheet. For extra brown tops, brush a little milk on top.
  • Bake the biscuits in the fully preheated 425ºF oven for 15-17 minutes, or until golden brown on top. Enjoy warm.

Notes

*Use any light vinegar, like apple cider, rice, or white vinegar. Lemon juice can also be used in place of vinegar.

Nutrition

Serving: 1biscuit | Calories: 237.85kcal | Carbohydrates: 31.73g | Protein: 5.13g | Fat: 9.99g | Sodium: 563.73mg | Fiber: 1.06g

Side view of a plate full of butter biscuits

How to Make Homemade Butter Biscuits – Step By Step Photos

biscuit dry ingredients in a bowl

Before you begin, freeze 6 Tbsp butter for 30-60 minutes to make it extra cold and solid. This makes it easier to grate into the batter. When you’re ready to start making the biscuits, begin to preheat the oven to 425ºF. In a large bowl, combine 2.5 cups of all-purpose flour, 1 Tbsp baking powder, ½ tsp baking soda, and ¾ tsp salt. Stir until they are well combined.

Grated butter added to the flour mixture in the bowl

Use a cheese grater to grate the semi-frozen butter into the flour mixture. Once grated, use your hands to work the butter into the flour until it kind of resembles cornmeal. 

Milk being poured into the batter

Combine 1 cup whole milk and 1 Tbsp vinegar (or lemon juice). Alternately, you can use 1 cup of buttermilk. Pour the milk into the butter and flour mixture.

Biscuit dough in the bowl

Stir until it forms a cohesive dough. Be careful not to overstir. Don’t worry if there is a little flour left on the bottom of the bowl. If the dough is too sticky, you can add a little flour in the next step. 

Folded biscuit dough

Place the dough onto a floured surface and press it down into a large rectangle. Fold the dough in on itself into thirds, like folding a letter. This helps create a few layers in the biscuits. Finally, press it down into a rectangle once again, this time about ½ to ¾-inch thick.

Biscuits being cut out of the dough with a drinking glass

Use a biscuit cutter or a drinking glass to cut the biscuits out of the dough. The glass I’m using is 3-inches in diameter. When you’ve cut all you can from the one piece of dough, gather up the scraps, press it down into a rectangle again, and cut a couple more. I got 8 biscuits out of my dough.

Unbaked biscuits on a lined baking sheet

Place the biscuits on a baking sheet lined with parchment paper. If you want the tops to get extra browned, you can brush a little milk on top.

Baked biscuits on the baking sheet

Bake the biscuits in the fully preheated 425ºF oven for 15-17 minutes, or until golden brown. 

Overhead view of a plate full of butter biscuits with honey and butter on the sides

Enjoy warm, slathered with butter and drizzled with honey or a dollop of your favorite jam!

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Deviled Eggs

Deviled Eggs are a classic, iconic appetizer for springtime and Easter. It’s the perfect recipe for using up hard-boiled Easter eggs. But deviled eggs go way beyond Easter, they are a great appetizer or side dish for any and every day of the year…

Deviled Eggs are a classic, iconic appetizer for springtime and Easter. It’s the perfect recipe for using up hard-boiled Easter eggs. But deviled eggs go way beyond Easter, they are a great appetizer or side dish for any and every day of the year. I think every party, potluck, and special occasion should start with…

The post Deviled Eggs appeared first on Two Peas & Their Pod.

The Case for Cooking With Vinegar

By an unfortunate set of circumstances, characterizing a person or thing as “sour as vinegar” implies negative traits. It may stem from the French origins of the word vinegar, vin aigre, meaning “sour wine”—an unfair assumption that all vinegar is made…

By an unfortunate set of circumstances, characterizing a person or thing as "sour as vinegar" implies negative traits. It may stem from the French origins of the word vinegar, vin aigre, meaning “sour wine”—an unfair assumption that all vinegar is made of bad juice. I can tell you for a fact, the best vinegars in the world are made of superlative ingredients, and fermented with intention. The outcome: a bright pantry staple that accentuates any food it touches.

Having worked in many restaurant kitchens, I couldn’t count if I tried the number of times I’ve heard a chef say, "If a dish is missing something, it probably needs acid." With this in mind, I wrote a book called Acid Trip, in which I traversed the globe learning how to make myriad vinegars, as well as cook with them. I’d be lying if I said I found one steadfast rule for how to use vinegar, aside from the belittling option to use it to clean.

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5 Tangy-Sweet Rice Vinegar Substitutes

Oh, the versatility of rice. Cooked simply, it can slant savory or sweet. Try as they may, vegetables repurposed as rice, like cauliflower, can only dream of imitating its likeness. And while we all know (and love) rice in its granular form, this shape…

Oh, the versatility of rice. Cooked simply, it can slant savory or sweet. Try as they may, vegetables repurposed as rice, like cauliflower, can only dream of imitating its likeness. And while we all know (and love) rice in its granular form, this shape-shifter pantry staple can be ground or soaked into the main ingredient for noodles, bread, milk—you name it. Rice can even be fermented and processed into the main ingredient in a boozy beverage (hello, sake!)

Speaking of fermented rice: Rice vinegar, or rice wine vinegar, is a seasoning agent derived from similar ingredients, albeit produced with a different technique. Commonly used in East Asian and some Southeast Asian cuisines, it's delicately tangy and slightly sweet, making it more mild in flavor and less acidic than its Western counterparts in the vinegar section. Rice vinegar comes in a range of colors, from white to yellow to red to black—each with varying flavor nuances and acidity strengths.

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Citrus Salad

One of the best things about winter? It’s citrus season. I love having fresh oranges, grapefruit, lemons, and limes to bring a bright spot to the short, dark winter days. I tend to go a little citrus crazy at the grocery store–it all smells…

One of the best things about winter? It’s citrus season. I love having fresh oranges, grapefruit, lemons, and limes to bring a bright spot to the short, dark winter days. I tend to go a little citrus crazy at the grocery store–it all smells so good!–and then come home and think, “Wait, what was I…

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