Your Fave Food52 Shows Are Now Streaming on a TV Near You

We’ve teamed up with Planet Oat—makers of creamy, dreamy Oatmilk—to spread the word about our brand-new streaming channel. (Psst: You can download it right now!)

Whether you’re a longtime Genius fan (have you heard about Kristen’s podcast?) or new t…

We've teamed up with Planet Oat—makers of creamy, dreamy Oatmilk—to spread the word about our brand-new streaming channel. (Psst: You can download it right now!)


Whether you're a longtime Genius fan (have you heard about Kristen's podcast?) or new to the Food52 world (welcome!), we're excited to share some big news with you: We're launching a streaming channel.

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Padma Lakshmi’s Prized Family Recipe: Crispy Masala Dosas With Coconut Chutney

Padma Lakshmi poses a difficult question to her daughter, Krishna, in the third episode of her new Hulu docu-series, Taste the Nation: “Do you prefer American pancakes to dosas?” Dosa being the paper-thin, crispy-edged, savory South Indian crepes made …

Padma Lakshmi poses a difficult question to her daughter, Krishna, in the third episode of her new Hulu docu-series, Taste the Nation: “Do you prefer American pancakes to dosas?” Dosa being the paper-thin, crispy-edged, savory South Indian crepes made of ground lentils and rice flour that she grew up eating three of in one sitting, and American pancakes being the fluffy stacks topped with butter and syrup. After some deliberation, Krishna replies, “I like pancakes...but I think I prefer dosas to waffles.”

Lakshmi has dealt with the duality of her food identities as an Indian-American person since she moved to the States when she was four years old. The pitting of dosas—which are her most nostalgic, homey comfort food—against the diner staple isn’t something she does often. Instead, she makes room for both in her Sunday brunches at home with her daughter, and applies that mindset to the rest of her life too. She doesn’t have to choose to be Indian or American on any given day.

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Watch What Our Team Is Cooking Right Now

Now more than ever, home is where many of us are seeking refuge and solace in light of the novel coronavirus. This is a tough time, but we’re here for you—whether it’s a new pantry recipe or a useful tip for your kitchen, here are some ideas to make th…

Now more than ever, home is where many of us are seeking refuge and solace in light of the novel coronavirus. This is a tough time, but we’re here for you—whether it’s a new pantry recipe or a useful tip for your kitchen, here are some ideas to make things run a little more smoothly for you and your loved ones.


As we all hunker down at home, the Food52 community has been cooking up a storm—in between conference calls and (sometimes!) in our most comfortable T-shirts and sweatpants. Below are some videos to share what we’ve been making in our own kitchens during this time. And as always, share with us what you’re cooking on Instagram with the hashtag #f52community.

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Watching These Thai Cooking Videos Is the Only Way I Can Get to Sleep

Home is the place we feel the most like ourselves—where we kick off our shoes, share our meals, and make memories. We’re taking our love for all things home and bringing it to Instagram. Follow along at Home52 and make yourselves—well, you know.

Lik…

Home is the place we feel the most like ourselves—where we kick off our shoes, share our meals, and make memories. We’re taking our love for all things home and bringing it to Instagram. Follow along at Home52 and make yourselves—well, you know.


Like many people who’ve reached the threshold of quarter-age, I can no longer get a decent night’s sleep. Be it lying awake with my eyelids jammed shut until 2 a.m., or a case of 4 a.m. anxiety, it’s a genuine struggle to get a fulfilling 8 hours.

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The Viral Croissant-Making Video We Can’t Stop Watching

Get this: A croissant takes 30 hours to make. Not 4 hours (the running time of the 2018 Oscars ceremony), not 12 hours (a flight from London to Singapore), not even 24 hours (the duration of a day for Monica Aldama, the star of Netflix’s Cheer and the …

Get this: A croissant takes 30 hours to make. Not 4 hours (the running time of the 2018 Oscars ceremony), not 12 hours (a flight from London to Singapore), not even 24 hours (the duration of a day for Monica Aldama, the star of Netflix’s Cheer and the award-winning coach of the Navarro cheer team). No, no, it takes 6 hours more than the sun’s rotation around the earth for my favorite pastry to be made from start to finish.

How do I know this fact? Because this video made by the lovely crew at Le Marais Bakery in San Francisco, taught me this fact.

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The Best Simple Cauliflower Soup

This is the simplest of cauliflower soups. And it is so incredibly good. The ingredient list is shorter than short, and if you have a great yellow curry paste on hand (or even just a good one), it is worth making.

Continue reading The Best Simple Cauliflower Soup on 101 Cookbooks

This is the simplest cauliflower soup. And it is so incredibly good. The ingredient list is shorter than short, and if you have a great yellow curry paste on hand (or even just a good one), it is worth making.

The Best, Simple Cauliflower Soup Recipe
The way it works is the following. Cook some onions and a bit of garlic in some olive oil. Toss in a few chopped potatoes. Add a bunch of cauliflower, and then flare it our with a jolt of curry paste. Cover the ingredients with water and let it all simmer until tender. The last step is to use a blender to blitz it until smooth into a beautiful cauliflower soup. The Best, Simple Cauliflower Soup Recipe

Best Method for Blended Soups?

I love the super silky texture you get from blending this soup in a high-speed blender, but a hand-blender is B+ level good as well. So, don’t sweat the equipment side of things too much. Also, make sure your ingredients are tender. Not overcooked, but notably tender.

Have Fun with Toppings

I get a little crazy with soup toppings, but you don’t have to. This one is good simple and straight too. Here cauliflower soup is topped with toasted pine nuts, fried shallots, and hemp seeds, and more of the yellow curry paste whisked with a bit of shallot oil. You could also season this with a favorite Indian spice blend, for another take. Or a simple showering of fresh herbs. Play around!

The Best, Simple Cauliflower Soup Recipe

Variations

A number of you have left comments with tweaks you’ve made to the recipe, and I love this! For example, Anna said, “I had a head of cauliflower to use. I didn’t have white or yellow potatoes so I used a sweet potato and left the skins on. Used a couple tablespoons of spicy Vindaloo curry powder. The soup turned out SO GOOD! And it’s a beautiful color from the sweet potato.” Nisa noted, “To make it a little heartier, we added moong dal (hulled yellow mung beans).” 

More blended soups

Don’t stop at cauliflower soup. You can make other blended soups using a very similar approach. This post is just the latest in a long-running series of love letter recipes to simple pureed soups, including (get ready 😉 carrot soup, asparagus soup, green soup, tomato soup, also this broccoli soup. What I’m saying is, blender soups forever. Or, if you want to browse all my favorite soups in one spot, all the soup recipes live here.

Continue reading The Best Simple Cauliflower Soup on 101 Cookbooks

Here’s 36 Blissful Seconds of Bread Rising in the Oven

So there are, of course, a million things to do. T-minus 24 hours to Turkey Day—and for some it might feel like the pressure of a dozen family members and twice as many side dishes are coming down upon them. This week should be fun … right?

The trut…

So there are, of course, a million things to do. T-minus 24 hours to Turkey Day—and for some it might feel like the pressure of a dozen family members and twice as many side dishes are coming down upon them. This week should be fun ... right?

The truth is, as we all know, hosting can be stressful and cooking a bird the size of your oven to perfection can be even more so. But that’s OK! Heck, that’s expected even. Stressing out right around now (or tomorrow or the next day) is par for the course. That’s why we’re here. At Food52 we like to think we can help ease things along—have you checked out the hotline? Otherwise, why not pause for a moment, take a deep breath. Remember what Thanksgiving is all about. Or better yet, watch this blissful video of bread rising in the oven:

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Wait—*That’s* How Cookie Cutters Are Made?

I’m like a straight up Luddite.

I steer clear of technological advances with the firmness of an iron rudder. I tend, rather, to find wonder—and often beauty—in the sheer dexterity of the human hand. You’ve probably seen me wax ad nauseum on this very …

I’m like a straight up Luddite.

I steer clear of technological advances with the firmness of an iron rudder. I tend, rather, to find wonder—and often beauty—in the sheer dexterity of the human hand. You’ve probably seen me wax ad nauseum on this very site about the various reaches of human culinary capacity.

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The Mango Cutting Video We Can’t Stop Watching

Are there any foods you love but find yourself avoiding in your own kitchen due to hassle, mess, or unreliability? Granted, getting your hands dirty is par for the course in the kitchen. But some people would rather avoid the mischief, the mistakes tha…

Are there any foods you love but find yourself avoiding in your own kitchen due to hassle, mess, or unreliability? Granted, getting your hands dirty is par for the course in the kitchen. But some people would rather avoid the mischief, the mistakes that certain ingredients beget.

For me, that food is mangoes. Don’t get me wrong (not even for a second!), I love them. They’re sumptuous and velvety and sweet in a way that makes me feel like a kid again, but I sometimes—sometimes!—find them a bit messy. I have to be prepared when I eat a mango, you know? It's not an apple, for crying out loud. If I'm going to eat a mango, I have to lay down a cloth towel and roll up my sleeves and carve out 10 minutes for the sucker. Mangos require my attention.

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Sriracha Rainbow Noodle Salad

This is a noodle salad you’ll crave every day. A radiant, color-flecked tangle of noodles, cabbage, shredded carrots, pickled sushi ginger, and an abundance of cilantro, basil, and scallions. It has tofu and peanuts, coconut, ginger, avocado, and hemp seeds. The dressing(!) – it’s simple but strong, and steps in with an assertive spicy sriracha-lime punch.

Continue reading Sriracha Rainbow Noodle Salad on 101 Cookbooks

This is a noodle salad you’ll crave every day. A radiant, color-flecked tangle of noodles, cabbage, shredded carrots, pickled sushi ginger, and an abundance of cilantro, basil, and scallions. It has tofu and peanuts, coconut, ginger, avocado, and hemp seeds. The dressing(!) – it’s simple but strong, and steps in with an assertive spicy sriracha-lime punch. This is one of those near-perfect one dish meals. You might not want to prep this many ingredients every day, but you’ll forget about that detail the minute you take a bite. And you can see exactly how it comes together in the video below. xx! -h

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Noodle Salad: Make Ahead Components

A couple of tips – you can make the dressing a few days in advance. You can also do much of the chopping and grating a day or two in advance. Cook the noodles to order, though.

Sriracha Rainbow Noodle Salad

Let me know if you try it, and please report back if you land on any seasonal adaptations that you are particularly excited about.

Continue reading Sriracha Rainbow Noodle Salad on 101 Cookbooks